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. V ' NT Y -SiXTH 

ktmUAL REPORT 

;;i mm ;j? i\mmu 

OF MARYLAND 

. Hi 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



STATE OF MARYLAND 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Seventy-sixth Annual Report 



OF THE 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
OF THE 

Public Schools of Maryland 

FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING JULY 31, 1942 




BALTIMORE, MD. 



STATE OF MARYLAND 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— OCTOBER, 1942 

Name Address Name Address 

TASKER G. LOWNDES, Pres Cumberland HARRY Y. GEORGE Baltimore 

*DR. J. M. T. FINNEY, Vice-Pres. Baltimore HORACE M. MORGAN Queen Anne 

WENDELL D. ALLEN Baltimore MRS. ALVIN THALHEIMER Baltimore 

•Deceased HENRY C. WHITEFORD Whiteford 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 

OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

1111 Lexington Building, Baltimore - 1, Md. 

Name Office 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. State Superintendent of Schools 

GRACE ALDER .-. Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

E. CLARKE FONTAINE ( Chesterto wn ) Supervisor of High Schools 

JAMES E. SPITZNAS (Cumberland) Supervisor of High Schools 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Supervisor of High Schools 

WILBER DEVILBISS Supervisor of High Schools 

J. WALTER HUFFINGTON Supervisor of Colored Schools 

JOHN J. SEIDEL Assistant Superintendent in Vocational Education and 

Director of Vocational Training for War Production Workers 

ELISABETH AMERY Supervisor of Home Economics Education 

H. F. COTTERMAN (College Park) Supervisor of Agriculture 

R. FLOYD CROMWELL Supervisor of Educational and Vocational Guidance 

GLEN BROWN Acting State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education 

DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN Supervisor of Special Education and Attendance 

R. C. THOMPSON (1112 Lexington Bldg.) Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation 

and Special Education 

THOMAS D. BRAUN (1112 Lexington Bldg.) Rehabilitation Assistant 

ROGER E. MARTZ (Hagerstown) Rehabilitation Assistant 

DONALD I. MINNEGAN Acting Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

ETHEL E. SAMMIS Asst. Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

ADELINE J. PRATT (400 Cathedral St.) State Director of Public Libraries 

BESSIE C. STERN (1114 Lexington Bldg.) ... Director, Bureau of Educational Measurements 

MERLE S. BATEMAN Director, Teacher Certification 

GRACE STEELE TRAVERS Financial Secretary 

E. SUE WALTER Clerk 

RUTH E. HOBBS Stenographer-Secretary 

ELIZABETH McGINNITY Stenographer-Secretary 

HELEN BUCHER BANDIERE Stenographer-Secretary 

EMMA E. LEUCKERT (1112 Lexington Bldg.) Stenographer-Secretary 

BETTY YARRISON (1112 Lexington Bldg.) Stenographer 

DRUSILLA CHAIRS Stenographer 

C. ELIZABETH OWINGS Stenographer 

MARY ELEANOR RICE (1114 Lexington Bldg.) Statistical Assistant 

ELSIE F. FORMAN Stenographer 

BEATRICE L. LEVI (1114 Lexington Bldg.) Statistical Assistant 

DOROTHY S. RICE (1114 Lexington Bldg.) Senior Clerk 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

M. THERESA WIEDEFELD State Teachers College, Towson 

JOHN L. DUNKLE State Teachers College, Frostburg 

J. D. BLACKWELL State Teachers College, Salisbury 

WILLIAM E. HENRY, JR. State Teachers College (For Colored Youth), Bowie 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

911 Lexington Building, Baltimore - 1, Md. 

HOOPER S. MILES State Treasurer and Chairman 

J. MILLARD TAWES State Comptroller 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR. State Superintendent of Schools 

EDWIN W. BROOME Superintendent of Montgomery County Schools, Vice-Chairman 

ALTHEA FULLER Principal, Allegany County 

MILDRED MEDINGER Secretary 

MINNIE M. HAMILTON Stenographer 

HELEN KIRKMAN Clerk 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS AND SUPERVISORS 

1942-43 



County Address 

ALLEGANY— Cumberland 
Charles L. Kopp, Supt. 
Lillian Compton, Asst. Supt. 
Jane Botsford 
Winifred Greene 
Mildred Willison 
Helen Sandfort (Art) 
Richard T. Rizer (High School) 
Harold McNally (Special Education) 

ANNE ARUNDEL— Annapolis 
Geo. Fox, Supt. 
Ruth Parker Eason 
Margaret Laws 

Howard A. Kinhart (High School) 

BALTIMORE— Towson 
C. G. Cooper, Supt. 
Edward G. Stapleton, Asst. Supt. 
M. Lucetta Sisk (Curriculum) 1 
Viola K. Almony 1 
Myrtle Eckhardt 1 
Jennie E. Jessop 1 
C. James Velie (Music) 1 
Olive Jobes (Art) 1 
* Herbert R. Steiner (Physical Ed.) 

CALVERT— Prince Frederick 
Harry R. Hughes, Supt. 
Mattie V. Hardesty 

CAROLINE— Denton 

W. Stewart Fitzgerald, Supt. 
A. May Thompson 

CARROLL— Westminster 

Raymond S. Hyson, Supt. 
Ruth DeVore 
Charles E. Reck 

Samuel M. Jenness (High School) 

CECIL— Elkton 

H. E. McBride, Supt. 
Olive L. Reynolds 

CHARLES— La Plata 

F. Bernard Gwynn, Supt. 
Jane Bowie 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 
W. Theodore Boston, Supt. 
Evelyn E. Johnson 

FREDERICK— Frederick 
E. W. Pruitt, Supt. 
L. Louise Freeman 
A. Drucilla Worthington 

GARRETT— Oakland 

Franklin E. Rathbun, Supt. 
Kate Bannatyne 2 
Caroline Wilson 



County Address 

HARFORD— Bel Air 

C. Milton Wright, Supt. 
Hazel L. Fisher 
Mary L. Grau 3 

HOWARD— Ellicott City 
H. C. Brown, Supt. 
Gail W. Chadwick 

KENT— Chestertown 

Louis C. Robinson, Supt. 
Esta V. Harrison 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 
E. W. Broome, Supt. 
Elizabeth Meany 
Eloise Cason 
Lucille Johnson (Music) 
Marjorie Billows (Art) ) 
Fern D. Schneider (High School) 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 
Nicholas Orem, Supt. 
Maude Gibbs Hyle 
Mary Kemp 4 
Catherine R. Greene* 
Derr Swisher (Physical Ed.) 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centreville 
Franklin D. Day, Supt. 
Tempe H. Dameron 

ST. MARY'S — Leonardtown 
Lettie M. Dent, Supt. 
E. Violette Young 

SOMERSET— Princess Anne 
C. Allen Carlson, Supt. 
Alice Mae Coulbourn 

TALBOT— Easton 

J. Willard Davis, Supt. 
William R. Phipps 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 
B. C. Willis, Supt. 
Pauline Blackford 
Katherine L. Healy 
Anne Richardson 
Maty Helen Chrissinger (Art) 
Miriam L. Hoffman (Music) 

WICOMICO— Salisbury 

James M. Bennett, Supt. 
Leah H. Phillips 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 

Arthur C. Humphreys, Supt. 
Elizabeth Mundy 



* Part time 

^00 W. Saratoga St., Balto. 
2 Grantsville 



3 Havre de Grace 
« Hyattsville 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 5 

Size of Maryland's School Program 7 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools and Length of Session 8 

Enrollment in Public and Non-Public Schools, Birth Rates, Ratio of 

High School to Total Enrollment. 9 

Percent and Index of Attendance 14 

Grade Enrollment, Elementary School Graduates and Non-Promotions 18 

Age-Grade Distribution Boys and Girls, Overage Elementary Pupils 30 

Education for Handicapped Children in Counties and City 34 

High School Graduates: Number, Persistence and Occupations 36 

High School Enrollment by Year and Subject 44 

Participation of White High School Pupils in Music Activities... 53 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 54 

Teachers by Subject, Clerks, Certification, Resignations, Turnover, 

Summer School Attendance 57 

Number Belonging and Average Salary per Teacher 71 

Number and Size of Schools 83 

Summer Schools, Evening Schools, Adult Education, Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, Defense Training 89 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Percent from State, Distribution of School Tax Dollar 97 

Cost per Pupil 103 

Financing the Vocational Education Program 114 

The Adult Education Program 117 

Transportation of Pupils 119 

Capital Outlay, Bonds Outstanding, Value of School Property 124 

1942-43 County Levies; Percent of Levies Used for Schools; Assess- 
ments; Tax Rates 128 

Parent-Teacher Associations 133 

State and County School Administration and Supervision 134 - 

The Maryland State Teachers Colleges — Towson, Frostburg, 

Salisbury, Bowie 164 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 172 

The Maryland Public Library Commission Aid to School Libraries. 173 

The State and County Health Program for School Children 176 

List of Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 179 

Index 222 



4 



Baltimore, Md., October 1, 1943 



Honorable Herbert R. 0' Conor, 
Governor of Maryland, 
Annapolis, Maryland. 

Dear Governor O'Conor : 

In accordance with Section 24 of Article 77, of the Laws 
of Maryland, the seventy-sixth "annual report, covering all opera- 
tions of the State Department of Education and the support, 
condition, progress, and needs of education throughout the State" 
for the school year ending in June, 1942, is herewith presented 
to you. 

In accordance with the policy during the emergency created 
by war conditions of eliminating or limiting State Reports to 
the most important and essential data, an abbreviated report 
similar to the one last year omitting the verbal analysis of in- 
formation included in tables or charts has been prepared. 

The aftermath of Pearl Harbor brought the schools into 
the program for civilian defense protection against air raids, 
victory gardens, better nutrition, physical fitness, acceleration 
of programs of high school pupils, rationing, registration of 
young men for selective service. The response of the teachers 
and school officials was immediate and whole-hearted and won 
the well merited appreciation of the public. 

The law equalizing salaries of colored and white teachers 
took effect as of January 1, 1942. It should eventually raise 
the standard of the teaching staff in the schools for colored 
children. 

It is with keen regret that the death of Dr. John M. T. 
Finney, on May 30, 1942, ended his long and valuable service as 
a member and vice-president of the State Board of Education 
from 1920. He attended almost every meeting of the State 
Board during more than two decades and lent his support to 
every effort to enrich the contribution of the public schools to 
education in a democracy. 

The school year 1941-42 marks the retirement of Albert 
S. Cook as State Superintendent of Schools after giving devoted 
and distinguished service to the cause of education of the children 
of Maryland since the beginning of the century as high school 
teacher and principal in Harford and Baltimore Counties, as 



5 



examiner and superintendent of Baltimore County, and as State 
Superintendent. Testimony to what his leadership has meant 
to the county superintendents and State Department staff is 
given on pages 140-142. The close of the school year also marked 
the retirement of Miss I. Jewell Simpson as assistant superin- 
tendent in charge of elementary instruction. Miss Simpson has 
been one of the ablest members of the staff of the Department 
since January 1921. To both of these leaders go good wishes 
for many years of well merited leisure, and opportunities for 
contributing their ability and experience in community service 
on a volunteer basis. 

The excellent law which governs the Maryland school 
program, its simple and efficient plan of organization for adminis- 
tration, supervision and financing, as well as the enthusiastic 
cooperation received from all county teachers, clerks, attendance 
workers, supervisors, and superintendents, who have been given 
the whole-hearted moral and financial support of their patrons, 
county boards of education and county commissioners have made 
possible the conditions shown in this report. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

Se cretary- Treasurer 



State Board of Education. 
Tasker G. Lowndes, President 
Wendell D. Allen, Vice-President 
Harry Y. George 
Horace M. Morgan 
Nicholas Orem 
Fannie Thalheimer 
Henry C. Whiteford 



6 



TABLE 1 



White and Colored Enrollment, Teaching Staff in, and Number of Public and Non- 
Public Schools in the Counties and Baltimore City for Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Type of School 


Elementary 


Secondary 


Grand Total 


















White 


Colored | Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored J Total 



Enrollment 



Public 

County 

City 

Elementary 

Junior High 

Senior High 

Vocational 

State. 

Non-Public 

City 

State 

Public and Non-Public 

County 

City 

State 


111,763 

54,574 
°12,074 


23,115 

25,935 
°3,488 


134,878 

80,509 
°15,562 


40,155 

°5!558 
12,745 
1,842 


5,112 

O l',205 
2,174 
454 


45,267 

°6 j 763 
14,919 
2,296 


♦151,918 

♦53,249 
♦17,207 
12,745 
1,842 


♦28,227 

♦25,802 
♦4,617 
2,174 
454 


♦180,145 

♦79,051 
♦21,824 
14,919 
2,296 


♦176,886 

12,679 
29,315 


♦52,362 

609 
1,299 


♦229,248 

13,288 
30,614 


♦60,075 

4,451 
5,297 


♦8,912 

iii 


♦68,987 

4,451 
5,438 


♦236,961 

17,130 
34,612 


♦61,274 

609 
1,440 


♦298,235 

17,739 
36,052 


41,994 

124,442 
95,963 


1,908 

23,724 
30,722 


43,902 

148,166 
126,1685 


9,748 

44,606 
25,217 


141 

5,112 
3,941 


9,889 

49,718 
29,158 


51,742 

♦169,048 
♦121,180 


2,049 

♦28,836 
♦34,663 


53,791 

♦197,884 
♦155,843 


*218,880 


♦54,270 


♦273,150 


♦69,823 


♦9,053 


♦78,876 


♦290,228 


♦63,499 


♦353,727 


Teaching Staff 


Public 

County 

City 

Elementary 

Junior High 

Senior High 

State 

Non-Public 

City 

State 

Public and Non-Public 

County 

City 

State 


2,933 

1,420 
648 


611 

652 
157 


3,544 

2,072 
805 


1,597 

'507 
110 


185 

" *85 
26 


1,782 

'592 
136 


4,530 

1,420 
648 
507 
110 


796 

652 
157 
85 
26 


5,326 

2,072 
805 
592 
136 


5,001 


1,420 


6,421 


2,214 


296 


2,510 


7,215 

912 
1,238 


1,716 

17 

63 


8,931 

929 
1,301 














2,150 

5,442 
3,923 


80 

813 
983 


2,230 

6,255 
4,906 














9,365 


1,796 


11,161 


Number of Schools 


Public 

County 

City 

Elementary 

Junior High 

Senior High 

Vocational 

State 

Non-Public 

County 

City 

State 

Public and Non-Public 

County 

City 

State 


585 

92 
tl6 


310 

38 
t4 


895 

130 
tt20 


148 

"f7 
7 


33 

" T 2 
1 


181 

tt9 

8 


♦634 

92 
U6 
t7 
7 


♦314 

38 
t4 
t2 
1 


♦948 

130 
tt20 

n l 


693 

104 
101 


352 

7 
9 


1,045 

111 
110 


162 

27 
21 


36 

"3 


198 

27 
24 


♦754 

♦118 
♦103 


♦357 
♦9 


♦1,111 

♦125 
*112 


205 

689 
209 


16 

317 
51 


221 

1,006 
260 


48 

175 

35 


3 

33 
6 


51 

208 
41 


♦221 

♦752 
♦223 


♦16 

♦321 
♦52 


♦237 

♦1,073 
♦275 


898 


368 


1,266 


210 


39 


249 


♦975 


♦373 


♦1,348 



* Excludes duplicates in counties and Baltimore City in elementary and secondary public schools, 
f Includes junior and senior parts of two combined junior-senior high schools. 

Enrollment in junior high schools is divided between grades 7-8 shown for elementary schools and 
grade 9 shown for high schools. Teaching staff in and number of junior high schools are reported 
under elementary schools. 



7 



8 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 2 



Dates of Opening and Closing Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1942 



County 


Date of 
Opening 

School in 
S a n t a m n u r 
1941 


Date of Closing Schools in 1942 


r or 
Elementary 
Schools 


r or 
High Schools 
(Except Seniors) 


r or 
riign scnoois 
Seniors 


Allegany 


4 


June 12 


T .n 

June 1£ 


iviay cm 


Anne Arundel 


8 


Tune 1? 




June 5 




8 


Tiino 1Q 
«l 111 1 c J. J7 


T„ n n 1Q 

June i.a 


June 5 




8 




June 5 


June 5 


Caroline 


3 




tMou 1Q 

4-iviay 1*7 


+Moir 1Q 




3 






iviay u i 




3 


Mov 9Q 
ivx ay i/ 


Mov 9Q 
L\lcLy LtX) 


A/fw 9Q 


Charles 


2 


tMay 18 


tMay 18 


tMay 18 




3 


**May 18 


**May 18 


**May 18 




3 


tMay 29 


tMay 29 


tMay 29 




2 


June 12 


June 12 


June 12 


Harford 


8 


June 12 


June 12 


June 5 


Howard 


3 


June 5 


June 5 


May 30 


Kent 


*3 


tMay 20 


tMay 20 


tMay 20 




o 
o 


June 9 


June 9 


°June 9 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


8 


June 9 


June 9 


June 9 


3 


tMay 16 


tMay 16 


tMay 16 


St. Mary's 


3 


tMay 29 


tMay 29 


tMay 29 


Somerset 


2 


May 27 


May 27 


May 22 


Talbot 


t4 


tMay 29 


tMay 29 


tMay 29 




3 


June 12 


June 12 


May 29 


Wicomico 


2 


May 29 


May 29 


May 29 


Worcester 


2 


tMay 11 


tMay 11 


tMay 11 


Baltimore City 


8 


June 19 


June 19 


June 19 



* Schools for colored pupils, September 2. f Schools for colored pupils, September ( J. 
t Sufficient sessions on Saturday to bring the total to 180 days. 
** Saturday classes, except for Lakes, Straights and Hoopers Island which closed June 2. 
° Except for Damascus where seniors completed the year on May 28th and Poolesville 
where seniors completed the year on May 21st. 



TABLE 3— Number of County Schools in Session Fewer than 180 Days, 
Year Ending June 30, 1942 





For All Counties by Year — 
Schools 




For 1942 by County— Schools 


Year 


Total 
No. 


Having 

One 
Teacher 


Having 
More 
Than One 
Teacher 


County 


Total 
No. 


Having 

One 
Teacher 


Having 
More 
Than One 
Teacher 



Schools for White Pupils 



1926 


124 


109 


15 


1930 


28 


22 


6 


1935 


33 


18 


15 


1941 


3 


2 


1 


1942 


12 


6 


6 



Anne Arundel 
Frederick .... 

Garrett 

Harford 

Montgomery . 
Pr. George's. 
Somerset 
Talbot 



al 
ab2 
a2 
cf2 
al 
a2 
al 
al 



Schools tor Colored PuriLs 



1941 


12 






Anne Arundel . . 


e4 


e4 












Charles 


dl 


dl 




1942 


6 






Montgomery . . . 


al 




al 



a 179.0-179.9 b 178 days c 173 days d 177.7 days. 

e Four schools open 179.9, 179.5, 178.3 and 175 days, respectively. 

f One school for children of defense workers, in session 143 days, opened late. 



Days in Session; Enrollment 1930 to 1942 



9 



TABLE 4 — Comparison of Enrollment in Counties and Baltimore City 
in Public and Non-Public Schools, 1930 to 1912 



Year 


Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Non-Public Schools 


! 

i Baltimore 
"Counties City 


°Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



"White Elementary School Enrollment 



1930 


118,717 


109.159 


108,737 


78,133 


8 , 722 


29,002 


1 258 


o 


024 


1931 


119,763 


108.736 


! 109,406 


77,304 


9,079 


29,462 


1,278 


1 


970 


1932 


121,923 


108,720 


111,370 


76,949 


9.321 


29.954 


1,232 


1 


817 


1933 


123,224 


108,420 


112,509 


76,426 


9,626 


30,399 


1,079 


1 


595 


1934 


122,881 


107,883 


111,907 


75,311 


9,876 


31,020 


1,098 


1 


552 


1935 


122,559 


107,192 


111,696 


74,818 


9,622 


30,735 


1,241 


1, 


639 


1936 


121,857 


107,230 


110,938 


75,316 


9,698 


30,171 


1,221 


1 


743 


1937 


122,247 


105,173 


110,955 


73.452 


9,785 


29,817 


1,507 


1 


904 


1938 


121,422 


103,094 


109,636 


71,392 


9,933 


29,384 


1,853 


2, 


318 




121,137 


100,250 


109,579 


68,863 


9,823 


29,090 


1,735 


2, 


297 


1940 


120,719 


96,947 


109,154 


66,896 


9,828 


27,947 


1,737 


2, 


104 


1941 


121,932 


95,401 


110.021 


65,732 


10,082 


27,371 


1,830 


2, 


298 


1942 


124,973 


94,438 


*112,294 


*65,123 


U0, 643 


26,703 


t2,036 


f2, 


612 



White High and Vocational School Enrollment 



1930 


27,893 


18,167 


24,760 


14,139 


1.480 


3,150 


1,653 


878 


1931 


30.193 


19,516 


! 26.998 


15,447 


1,509 


3,215 


1,686 


854 


1932 


31,775 


21,560 


28,547 


17,173 


1,574 


3,553 


1,654 


834 


1933 


33,678 


23.399 


30,778 


18,920 


1,542 


3,755 


1,358 


724 


1934 


33.760 


23,439 


31,036 


19,056 


1,389 


3,699 


1,335 


684 


1935 


34,823 


24,679 


31,786 


19,897 


1,592 


4,023 


1,445 


759 


1936 


36,249 


25,438 


33,111 


20,416 


1,587 


4,211 


1,551 


811 


1937 


37,313 


25,365 


33,959 


20,012 


1,707 


4,435 


1,647 


918 


1938 


38,007 


25,111 


34.415 


19,712 


1,787 


4,562 


1,805 


837 


1939 


40,496 


26,410 


36.637 


20,997 


2,022 


4,610 


1,837 


803 


1940 


42,273 


27,093 


38,492 


21,421 


2,083 


4,841 


1,698 


831 


1941 


44,125 


26,784 


39,948 


21,559 


2,496 


4,382 


1,681 


843 


1942 


44,606 

* 


25,217 


*40,155 


*19,920 


t2,676 


t4,419 


tl,775 


t878 



°Colored Elementary School Enrollment 



1930 


27,367 


22,068 


26,759 


20,643 


582 


1,347 


1931 


27,307 


22,154 


26,680 


20,851 


591 


1,234 


1932 


27,169 


23,560 


26,558 


22,289 


583 


1,211 


1933 


27,312 


24,412 


26,708 


22,914 


604 


1,425 


1934 


26,954 


25,717 


26,347 


24,160 


607 


1,432 


1935 


26,451 


26,702 


25,908 


25,189 


543 


1,392 


1936 


25,828 


27,860 


25,328 


26,328 


497 


1,424 


1937 


25,221 


28,519 


24,698 


27,038 


523 


1,382 


1938 


24,693 


28,131 


24,133 


26,686 


537 


1,360 


1939 


24,604 


29,830 


24,052 


28,374 


529 


1,367 


1940 


24,328 


29,877 


23,809 


28,408 


519 


1,393 


1941 


24,104 


30,515 


23,552 


29,112 


562 


1,335 


1942 


23,853 


30,546 


*23,244 


*29,247 


t609 


1,249 



Colored High and Vocational School Enrollment 



2,099 


2,351 


1,953 


2,335 


2,360 


2.622 


2,230 


2,601 


2 , 589 


2,812 


2,489 


2,794 


2,808 


3,134 


2,750 


3,114 


2,827 


3,071 


2,819 


3,042 


3,053 


3,199 


3,019 


3,164 


3,547 


3,211 


3,544 


3,176 


4,030 


3,322 


4,030 


3,246 


4,338 


3,480 


4,334 


3,378 


4,567 


3,838 


4,567 


3,714 


4,818 


4,149 


4,818 


4,033 


5,168 


4,188 


5,168 


4,057 


5,112 


3,941 


*5,112 


*3,800 



15 
20 
18 
14 
16 
11 
14 
58 
84 

106 
97 

112 
T128 



13 
24 
21 
18 
18 
18 
19 
19 
tl3 



° Includes for county public schools enrollment in elementary schools of State normal 
schools or teachers colleges. 

* For public school enrollment in detail by counties and Baltimore City see Table II, 
pages 184 and 185. 

t For non-public school enrollment in detail by school, county and Baltimore Citv. see 
Tables III-V, pages 186 to 190. 



10 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



ssszss. 



TABLE 5 

Total Enrollment in Maryland Elementary Schools, White and Colored, 
for Years Ending in June, 1923, 1941, and 1942 



Eh 
<J 

O 

Q 
W 

o 
w 



§5 

Eh 



□ H 
O g 
3 



County 



Total Counties . 

Baltimore 

Prince George's 
Montgomery . . . 

Allegany 

Washington 

Anne Arundel . . 

Frederick 

Harford 

Carroll 

Garrett. 

Wicomico 

Cecil 

Howard 

Dorchester. . . . 

Worcester 

Caroline 

Somerset 

Charles 

Talbot 

Queen Anne's . . 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Baltimore City 

Total State 



White Elementary Schools 



Number Enrolled 



1923 



*°105,772 

°13,154 
6,421 
4,524 

°10,985 
10,859 
4,947 
8,505 
4,290 
5,902 
5,373 
3,986 
3,405 
2,241 
3,432 
2,298 
3,025 
3,059 
1,803 
2,105 
2,101 
1,748 
2,117 
1,060 

*t79,709 

*1185,481 



1941 



*°109,481 

°17,603 
11,363 
10,717 
°11,571 
10,697 
6,488 
6,694 
4,348 
4.671 
3,726 
°3,272 
3,080 
2,242 
2,475 
1,881 
1,828 
1,840 
1,520 
1 , 598 
1,420 
1,245 
832 
802 

*f65,732 

*U75,213 



1942 



*°111,763 

°18,617 
12,534 
11,597 
°11,409 
10,477] 
7,050 
6,509 
4,686 
4,578 
3,573 
°3,131 
3,127 
2,442 
2,334 
1,753 
1,745 
1,726 
1,627 
1,469 
1,354 
1,147 
823 
804 

*t65,123 

*U76,886 



County 



Total Counties. 

Prince George's 
Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Montgomery . . . 

Charles 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Dorchester . . . . 

Calvert 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Harford 

Frederick 

Kent 

Caroline 

Howard 

Queen Anne's. . 

Cecil 

Carroll 

Washington 

Allegany 

Baltimore City 
Total State 



Colored Elementary Schools 



Number Enrolled 



1923 



*31,070 

2,781 
2,853 
1,942 
1,898 
1,803 
2,255 
1.675 
2,088 
1,947 
1,343 
1,404 
1,373 
916 
1,150 
1,188 
1,188 
848 
1,093 
548 
440 
377 
267 



*U5,675 
*t46,745 



1941 



*°23,430 

°2,962 
°2,860 
1,846 
1,734 
1,374 
1,326 
1,256 
1,219 
1,142 
1,090 
809 
855 
757 
765 
653 
631 
608 
636 
372 
322 
239 
205 



*f29,112 
*t52,542 



1942 



*°23,115 

°3,000 
°2,938 
1,863 
1,710 
1,384 
1,267 
1,206 
1,187 
1,116 
1,063 
803 
802 
753 
742 
641 
617 
617 
590 
353 
298 
247 
208 



*f29,247 
*f52,362 



* Totals exclude duplica'es. 

f Includes estimate of enrollment of grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools in Baltimore 
City. 

° Excludes enrollment in elementary schools of State teachers colleges : 

College 1923 1941 1942 College 1941 1942 

Towson 179 237 237 Bowie 122 129 

Frostburg 122 179 179 

Salisbury 124 124 Anne Arundel 27 27 

Prince George's .... 95 102 

For enrollment by counties arranged alphabetically and by type of organization see Table 

II, pages 184 to 185. 



Enrollment in Public Elementary and High Schools 



11 



TABLE 6 

Total Enrollment in Last Four Years of Maryland High Schools for 
Years Ending in June 1923, 1941 and 1942 



County 



Total Counties 

Baltimore 

Allegany 

Prince George s . . . . 

Montgomery 

A.nne Arundel 

Washington 

Frederick 

Carroll 

Harford 

Cecil 

Wicomico 

Garrett 

Dorchester 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Howard 

Talbot 

Somerset 

Charles 

Kent 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Baltimore City 

Total State 



White Enrollment 
in High Schools 



1923 



*14,888 

1,512 
1,665 
824 
609 
454 
1,281 
1,421 
775 
651 
514 
901 
449 
558 
597 
649 
284 
437 
462 
99 
282 
403 
23 
143 

*tll,465 

*f26,353 



1941 



*39,948 

6,227 
4,347 
3,584 
3,249 
2,658 
2,715 
2,507 
1,899 
1,573 
1,334 
1,326 
1,224 
1,033 
883 
804 
782 
702 
733 
619 
542 
543 
439 
220 

*f21,559 

*f61,507 



1942 



*40,155 

6,451 
.4,240 
3,975 
3,298 
2,736 
2,657 
2,449 
1,861 
1,631 
1,340 
1,297 
1,296 
1,021 
8561 
835 
762 
685 
680 
652 
541 
520 
430 
2471 

*tl9,916 
*t60,07ll 



Cot'NTY 



Total Counties. 

Anne Arundel . . 
Prince George's 

Wicomico 

Montgomery . . . 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Baltimore 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Frederick 

Harford 

Caroline 

Kent 

Queen Anne's . . 

Cecil 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Howard 

Allegany 

Washington 

Baltimore City. 
Total State 



Colored Enrollment 
in High Schools 



1923 



*447 
58 

m 

"l8 
78 



*U,331 
*tl,778 



1941 



*5,168 

451 
507 
416 
363 
376 
336 
305 
276 
202 
224 
210 
203 
180 
179 
188 
148 
123 
165 
110 

59 
103 

56 



*t4,057 
*t9,225 



1942 



*5,112 

507 
434 
402 
372 
367 
326 
320 
300 
276 
213 
212 
195 
188 
172 
167 
130 
124 
120 
108 
85 
68 
45 

*t3,800 
*t8,912 



* Excludes duplicates. 

flncludes estimated ninth grade enrollment in junior high schools, and enrollment in 
vocational schools. 

For enrollment by counties arranged alphabetically and by type of organization see Table 
II, pages 184 to 185. 



12 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 7 

Recorded and Resident Birth Rates Per 1,000 White and Colored Population 

Reported by Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 


Recorded Birth Rates 


Resident Birth Rates* 




















1920 


1930 | 1935 


1940 


1941 


1935 


1939 


1940 


1941 



White 





CO . 


17 A 
1 / .4 


1 A Q 
14. d 


1 Q A 
La . 4 


1 A K 
14 . O 


1 1 . u 


18 4 
18 . 4 


i a n 
lo . / 


01 o 


Allegany 


27.1 


22.2 


20.4 


22.7 


23.9 


19.5 


19.0 


20.0 


21.0 




20.2 


14.4 


13.8 


11.3 


13.6 


16.9 


17.6 


16.9 


21.2 




21.5 


13.9 


8.1 


6.4 


6.8 


14.5 


14.7 


18.8 


22.5 


Calvert 


26.6 


22.2 


19.8 


21.2 


18.8 


20.6 


21.4 


21.2 


19.7 




23.1 


16.5 


16.6 


15.4 


17.5 


19.5 


16.6 


17.4 


19.4 


Carroll 


22.1 


15.1 


13.0 


10.6 


10.2 


16.5 


17.1 


17.4 


17.7 


Cecil 


22.4 


19.9 


15.7 


16.1 


19.0 


17.7 


16.7 


18.4 


22.9 




23.6 


20.1 


17.2 


17.1 


19.8 


23.2 


25.2 


20.1 


25.5 




26.9 


19.2 


15.5 


14.6 


14.9 


15.3 


15.6 


15.2 


15.3 


Frederick 


25.0 


20.2 


17.6 


17.3 


19.1 


17.2 


16.4 


16.9 


18.3 


Garrett 


28.4 


24.2 


24.3 


21.1 


20.7 


25.8 


25.8 


24.1 


23.9 


Harford 


18.6 


17.8 


14.0 


13.1 


15.2 


16.7 


17.6 


18.3 


21.0 




22.8 


14.9 


13.9 


11.5 


12.5 


19.1 


18.8 


21.2 


22.3 


Kent 


21.5 


12.6 


11.8 


16.1 


16.3 


12.6 


14.7 


17.7 


16.6 




20.9 


13.6 


14.9 


11.5 


13.3 


18.7 


26.3 


20.7 


25.0 


Prince George's ....... 


20.9 


11.4 


7.5 


4.5 


4.8 


19.2 


23.9 


19.3 


24.2 


Queen Anne's 


21.1 


18.1 


13.1 


11.3 


10.7 


14.6 


17.6 


15.3 


16.4 




26.8 


26.7 


25.8 


24.2 


22.3 


25.5 


25.8 


24.6 


22.7 




24.7 


17.9 


14.6 


13.9 


11.7 


14.2 


13.4 


16.5 


15.7 




22.0 


19.4 


16.9 


20.5 


22.7 


13.4 


14.5 


16.5 


15.8 


Washington 


26.9 


20.4 


17.5 


18.3 


20.6 


17.7 


18.6 


18.4 


20.6 




22.3 


18.4 


14.0 


21.8 


22.8 


12.3 


14.9 


17.0 


16.5 




20.0 


15.7 


9.3 


10.7 


12.1 


11.9 


16.2 


14.5 


16.5 


Baltimore City 


25.3 


17.6 


15.4 


18.1 


21.5 


13.7 


13.2 


14.6 


17.1 


Entire State 


24.5 


17.5 


14.9 


15.6 


17.7 


15.5 


15.9 


16.7 


19.2 


Colored 


County Average 


28.6 


23.5 


26.7 


19.8 


20.2 


22.9 


24.2 


24.9 


26.2 


Allegany 


29.3 


18.7 


15.0 


25.0 


23.7 


15.0 


21.4 


24.3 


24.5 


Anne Arundel 


29.1 


25.6 


20.2 


19.4 


18.6 


25.3 


28.7 


27.3 


27.9 


Baltimore 


25.2 


15.1 


9.3 


8.9 


8.7 


16.8 


13.4 


22.1 


22.6 


Calvert 


31.8 


32.7 


29.0 


27.6 


26.6 


29.0 


37.6 


28.0 


27.6 




26.1 


24.5 


20.7 


25.9 


27.2 


21.7 


22.8 


26.4 


26.6 


Carroll 


30.5 


22.1 


17.4 


17.2 


13.7 


19.7 


26.8 


21.5 


18.9 


Cecil 


26.3 


20.4 


25.7 


19.6 


24.9 


25.3 


20.5 


20.9 


24.8 


Charles 


35.5 


30.8 


29.4 


30.1 


34.3 


31.0 


33.6 


35.2 


38.6 


Dorchester 


31.0 


22.2 


19.7 


22.9 


21.2 


19.5 


20.2 


22.7 


21.1 


Frederick 


29.6 


26.1 


19.8 


24.2 


29.1 


20.2 


21.0 


24.4 


29.1 


Harford 


19.2 


29.1 


20.1 


19.3 


20.1 


22.0 


20.8 


22.1 


21.6 




30.3 


20.2 


21.3 


18.3 


20.0 


24.4 


26.1 


26.5 


29.5 




29.0 


23.4 


19.4 


21.9 


19.9 


20.1 


18.9 


23.1 


21.4 




28.3 


22.7 


19.2 


17.3 


19.5 


21.5 


22.7 


22.6 


26.3 




27.0 


21.7 


17.9 


10.3 


8.5 


26.2 


26.0 


26.7 


29.4 




22.3 


19.4 


18.7 


19.3 


17.7 


18.9 


17.8 


20.2 


20.2 




33.3 


27.4 


24.5 


30.1 


29.6 


25.0 


25.0 


31.5 


31.9 


Somerset 


31.2 


22.2 


22.2 


21.5 


22.5 


23.4 


19.2 


23.9 


25.9 


Talbot 


28.1 


19.8 


22.1 


23.6 


23.3 


21.4 


18.2 


22.0 


21.9 


Washington 


19.7 


13.4 


12.6 


20.7 


17.6 


13.0 


16.8 


23.5 


19.9 


Wicomico 


30.9 


25.9 


23.9 


22.6 


28.2 


21.5 


22.9 


20.1 


24.1 


Worcester 


26.8 


28.3 


23.4 


22.2 


21.9 


24.0 


25.6 


24.1 


23.5 


Baltimore City 


26.1 


22.6 


19.5 


23.3 


26.1 


18.5 


19.1 


21.6 


24.3 


Entire State 


27.5 


23.1 


20.0 


21.7 


23.4 


20.5 


21.1 


22.8 


24.9 



* Prior to 1935, birth rates were calculated on births occurring in the indicated areas and 
are shown under the heading "Recorded Birth Rates." For 1935, 1939, 1940 and 1941, birth 
rates are shown by residence of mother, as well as for 1935, 1940 and 1941 according to loca- 
tion of birth. 



Birth Rates; Ratio of High School to Total Enrollment 



13 



TABLE 8 

Ratio of "Number Belonging" in High Schools to "Number Belonging" in 
Elementary and High Schools Combined, for School Year Ending in 
June 1924, 1940, 1941 and 1942 



County 



Schools for White Pupils 



1924 1940 1941 al942 



County 



Schools for Colored Pupils 



1924 



1940 



County Average . . 

St. Mary's 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Kent 

Cecil 

Dorchester 

Carroll 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundel .... 

Charles 

Somerset 

Queen Anne's .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Allegany x 

Harford 

Baltimore 

Howard 

Prince George's. . 

Calvert 

Montgomery 

Washington x . . . . 

Baltimore City xj 

Total State 



13.3 

3.0 
18.8 
18.9 
18.7 
15.2 
14.3 
16.7 
13.7 
19.9 
xl0.2 

5.5 
15.2 
18.3 
14.9 

8.4 
13.5 
14.8 
11.0 
12.7 
11.6 
15.5 
13.9 
11.1 

12.1 

13.2 



§25.9 

34.4 
30.3 
29.7 
29.5 
29.1 
30.8 
27.7 
28.1 

§28.6 
28.6 
30.1 
29.5 
27.1 
26.8 
24.3 

§25.6 
27.6 

§25.5 
25.6 
25.3 
20.9 

x23.5 
20.0 

25.0 

§25.2 



§26.3 

35.6 
32.2 
30.3 
30.7 
30.6 
30.4 
29.2 
29.0 

§29.1 
29.2 
29.2 
28.2 
27.7 
27.1 
24.5 

§26 
27 

§26 
26 
25 
21 

x23 



20.0 
25.2 
§26.0 



§26.0 

35.3 
32.4 
32.4 
31.7 
31.5 
30.1 
30.0 
29.4 
§28.8 
28.4 



28.1 
28.0 
27.9 
27.2 
26.4 

§26.3 
25.9 

§25.7 
24.7 
24.2 
23.6 

x22.5 
19.7 

24.1 

§25.4 



County Average 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Wicomico 

Allegany 

Dorchester 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Charles 

Frederick 

Kent 

Harford 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Montgomery 

Washington x . . . 

Baltimore 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Prince George's. 

Howard 

Calvert 



Baltimore City x*% 
Total State 



2.0 

4.0 

6.6 
11.9 
4.7 
2.3 

3.6 
1.8 
6.7 
3.0 

i.6 

2.6 



2.5 
1.5 
7.8 



9.2 
4.8 



§16.8 



25 
22 
24 
29 
20 
21 
18 

19.8 
18.6 
20.9 
21.8 
15.8 
16.0 
20.8 
18.6 
14.8 
19.3 
tl2.2 
§14.2 
§13.1 
9.4 
11.8 



*12.4 
§14.5 



§ Includes pupils enrolled in elementary school (s) of State teachers college (s). 

x County has 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization in all or part of schools as against 7-4 or 
6-5 plan in remaining counties, and Montgomery and Baltimore City have a number 
of kindergartens. 

* Excludes Baltimore County pupils who attended high schools in Baltimore City at 
the expense of Baltimore County. 

t Vocational and ninth year of junior high schools are included with senior high schools, 
a For number belonging by types of schools, see Table VI, page 191. 

f Includes Baltimore County pupils who attended school in Baltimore City at the expense 
of Baltimore County. 



14 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 9 

Percent of Attendance in White and Colored Elementary Schools for School 
Years Ending in June 1923, 1940, 1941 and 1942 



County 



White Schools 



1923 1940 1941 1942 



County 



Colored Schools 



1923 1940 1941 1942 



County Average 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Wicomico 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Allegany 

Dorchester 

Prince George's . 

Frederick 

Somerset 

Carroll 

Queen Anne's. . . 

Washington 

Worcester 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Garrett 

Cecil 

Montgomery 

Howard 

Charles 

Harford 

Baltimore City . . 

Total State 



°84.2 



3 92.2 



3 91.7 



|92. 
°92. 

93. 

91. 
*°93. 

92. 

93. 

93. 

92. 
t93. 

92. 
*92. 

91. 

92. 
t°91. 

91. 

92. 

91. 
*91. 

90. 

90. 

89. 



t90. 
t90. 
°91. 

92. 

91. 
*°93. 

90. 

92. 

92. 

91. 
|92. 

92. 
*92. 
t89. 

91. 
t°91. 

91. 

91. 

89. 
*90. 

90. 

89. 
t89. 



89.6 
86.4 



*90.3 
91.5 



*90.3 
91.2 



°91.4 

t93.4 
f93.2 
°92.8 
92.6 
92.5 
*°92.4 
92.3 
92.3 
92.3 
92.2 
t92.1 
91.7 
*91.3 
f91.3 
91.3 
t°91.1 
90.7 
90.3 
90.1 
*89.9 
89.3 
89.3 
t88.7 

*90.3 

91.0 



County Average 

Allegany 

Queen Anne's. . . 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Talbot 

Somerset 

Caroline 

Prince George's . 

Frederick 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Kent 

Cecil 

Baltimore 

Dorchester 

Montgomery 

Harford 

Howard 

St. Mary's 

Carroll 

Worcester 

Charles 

Calvert 

Baltimore City. 

Total State 



76.2 

87.4 
73.1 
81.7 
84.8 
84.3 
80.5 
76.4 
76.4 
84.6 
71.2 
73.4 
74.4 
75.4 
74.2 
80.8 
79.9 
71.0 
62.9 
72.0 
80.1 
66.8 
65.3 

87.0 

79.9 



°87.2 

94.3 
93.0 
92.6 
90.5 
90.1 
89.6 
89.3 

°88.7 
90.5 

°87.8 
89.3 
90.9 

t88.9 
84.4 
87.3 
87.6 
86.2 
82.5 
86.8 
81.2 
79.4 
80.3 

*88.8 

88.0 



°87.6 

*92.6 
93.2 

*93.4 
90.2 
90.6 
89.8 
87.8 

°90.7 
90.8 



89.7 
89.3 

t88.3 
84.7 
87.2 
82.8 
85.6 
83.8 

t82.8 
82.7 
81.0 
81.8 

*87.7 

87.7 



*93.5 
93.5 

*92.8 
92.6 
91.4 
91.3 
91.2 

°91.1 
90.8 

°90.6 
90.2 
88.9 

t88.6 
88.5 
87.9 
86.4 
86.4 
85.4 

t84.9 
84.5 
82.6 
82.3 

*88.3 

88.5 



* Includes junior high schools, grades 7-8. 
t Includes junior high school, grade 7. 
For attendance in 1942 arranged alphabetically and by type of organization see Table 
IX, page 194. 

° Excludes percent of attendance in elementary schools of State teachers colleges : 



State Teachers College 



Salisbury . 
Bowie 



1923 


1940 


1941 


1942 


92.2 


95.8 


94.8 


93.4 


87.4 


91.6 


91.1 


92.5 




94.0 


93.0 


95.3 




94.2 


95.0 


93.6 



Anne Arundel . . . 
Prince George's . 



Percent of Elementary School Attendance 



15 



• CO CO X OS 



c S 2-5 oi}« 3 at £ »-3 o 8 5-1 S 



M 
u 
O 

o 



. s 

-w O 
t. tsfl 



3S 



ox: es 
2v3 




5-° 

B U 

a b 

J2H 



^eoweo^eo^e^NNNNOOOOsosod • • • • • 

^oic-t-^HNoioant-nNONfao • • 

HoaxoecfOHHOMooooooit-to • • -O 
as as oo as as os cs cs as so cs as as oo as cs oc oc oo • • -as 

os©ect~ooas«eow«ase-]<oe-c-<-<oji£>toeoe-jeorH 

Mt>KMMXt-KXt-Xt-t-XXt-XXt-Xt-»» 



> • on «- O • C • 

>> SS*jM • C B « «, S =5*C 

1 | U IS |S| ii H|: 



O (4 C m2 



16 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 11 



An Index of School Attendance in County Elementary Schools,* White and 
Colored, for School Year Ending June 30, 1942 





Percent of 


Rank in Percent of 


County 


tAttend- 
ance 


JLate 
Entrants 


With- 
drawals 


tAttend- 
ance 


JLate 
Entrants 


With- 
drawals 



White Schools 



County Average 


91.4 


•6 


1.6 










92.3 


.2 


1.0 


8 


3 


4 




91.7 


.2 


.1 


12 


4 


1 


Somerset. 


92.2 


.2 


1.1 


10 


5 


5 


Caroline 


93.2 


1.0 


.6 


2 


17 


2 


Wicomico 


92.8 


.1 


2.3 


3 


1 


22 


Frederick 


92.3 


.7 


1.4 


9 


12 


11 


Anne Arundel 


91.3 


.5 


1.2 


15 


10 


7 


Calvert 


90.7 


.4 


1.2 


17 


8 


8 


Carroll 


92.1 


1.0 


1.2 


11 


16 


6 


Allegany 


92.4 


.4 


2.0 


6 


9 


20 


Dorchester 


92.3 


1.0 


1.2 


7 


19 


9 


Talbot 


93.4 


1.8 


1.4 


1 


21 


13 


Cecil 


90.1 


.8 


1.0 


19 


14 


3 


Garrett 


90.3 


.1 


1.6 


18 


2 


16 


Kent 


92.6 


1.0 


1.4 


4 


18 


14 


Worcester 


91.3 


.3 


1.9 


14 


6 


18 


Baltimore. 


91.1 


.3 


1.7 


16 


7 


17 


St. Mary's 


92.5 


2.3 


1.4 


5 


23 


12 


Howard 


89.3 


.7 


1.3 


21 


13 


10 


Washington 


91.3 


1.0 


2.2 


13 


15 


21 


Montgomery 


89.9 


.7 


2.0 


20 


11 


19 


Harford 


88.7 


1.9 


1.6 


23 


22 


15 


Charles 


89.3 


1.2 


2.5 


22 


20 


23 



Colored Schools 



- t 

County Average 


88.8 


3.2 


2.1 








Queen Anne's 


93.5 


.3 




2 


2 




Washington 


92.8 


.8 


'i'.t 


3 


4 


9 




92.6 


.6 


1.7 


4 


3 


10 


Frederick 


90.8 


1.2 


1.1 


9 


6 


6 


Allegany 


93.5 




3.8 




1 


21 


Somerset 


91.3 


iis 


2.0 


6 


8 


11 


Prince George's 


91.1 


1.0 


2.4 


8 


5 


13 


Kent 


90.2 


2.9 


1.4 


11 


13 


7 


Talbot 


91.4 


7.4 


.8 


5 


22 


4 


Anne Arundel 


90.6 


4.9 


1.5 


10 


18 


8 


Howard 


86.4 


1.4 


2.1 


17 


7 


12 


Dorchester 


88.5 


6.4 


.9 


14 


19 


5 




91.2 


4.8 


2.6 


7 


17 


15 


Cecil 


88.9 


1.6 


2.7 


12 


9 


18 


Calvert 


82.3 


4.3 . 


.8 


22 


16 


3 


St. Mary s 


85.4 


7.3 


.6 


18 


21 


2 


Montgomery 


87.9 


2.0 


2.6 


15 


11 


16 


Baltimore 


88.6 


1.7 


3.9 


13 


10 


22 


Carroll 


84.9 


2.3 


2.6 


19 


12 


17 


Worcester 


84.5 


3.4 


2.5 


20 


15 


14 


Harford 


86.4 


3.0 


3.5 


16 


14 


20 




82.6 


6.8 


3.4 


21 


20 


19 



* Excludes elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 

t For percent of attendance by counties arranged alphabetically see Table IX, page 194. 

X Late entrance for employment, indifference, or neglect. The county having the smallest 
percentage of late entrants is ranked first. 

° Withdrawals for causes other than removal, transfer, commitment to institutions, or 
death. The county having the smallest percentage of withdrawals is ranked first. 



Index of Attendance; High School Attendance 



17 



TABLE 12 

Percent of Attendance in Maryland High Schools for School Year Ending 
June 1923, 1938, 1941 and 1942 



White High Schools 



County 



County Average . 



Wicomico 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Somerset 

Washington .... 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Baltimore 

Prince George's 

Howard 

Queen Anne s . . 

St. Mary's 

Dorchester. . . . 

Charles 

Kent 

Talbot 

Anne Arundel . . 
Montgomery . . . 

Worcester 

Harford 

Garrett 

Cecil 

Caroline 

"Baltimore City 

Total State 



1923 1938 1941 I 1942 



91.9 



94.7 



93.4 



93.4 



92.3 


96.0 


95 


.5 


95.7 


91.5 


96.2 


95 


.0 95.3 


94.8 


95.4 


95 


1 


94.7 


91.4 


96.0 


94 


.7 94.6 


93.1 


95.8 


95 


1 


94.5 


93.5 


94.0 


94 


4 


93.9 


88.7 


95.1 


94 





93.9 


91.3 


94.6 


93 


4 


93.8 


91.8 


95.0 


93 


5 


93.7 


89.9 


93.8 


92 


8 


93.2 


91.9 


95.2 


93 


3 


93.2 


86.8 


93.4 


92 


.2 


93.1 


92.4 


95.4 


93 


2 


93.0 


88.7 


94.3 


92 


9 


92.8 


90.2 


95.2 


93 


.8 


92.8 


93.2 


93.0 


92 


4 


92.81 


92.1 


95.1 


92 


.5 


92.4 


88.9 


93.1 


91 


5 


91.9 


91.7 


93.8 


92 





91.7 


91.2 


93.2 


91 


6 


91. 6 1 


90.2 


93.5 


92 


5 


91.2 


92.0 


93.9 


91 


6 


90.6 


91.2 


92.5 


89 


1 


90.3 


91.5 


94.7 


93 


8 


93.6 


91.6 


94.7 


93 


6 


93.5 



Colored High Schools 



County 



1923 1938 1941 1942 



County Average . 



Allegany 

Frederick 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Harford 

Baltimore 

Anne Arundel . . 
Prince George's 

Kent 

Washington 

Queen Anne's. . 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

Calvert 

Montgomery . . . 

Charles 

Talbot 

Cecil 

St. Mary's 

Caroline 

Howard 



'Baltimore City 
Total State 



89 


3 


93 


2 


91 


7 


92.2 


93 


5 


96 


1 


96 





96.9 


90 


5 


95 


3 


93 


2 95.4 






91 


6 


92 


81 94.5 


90 


5 


94 


6 


93 


G 


94.3 






95 


1 


92 


4 


93.7 






92 


1! 90 


6 


93.7 










*94 


6 


*93.6 


88 


9 


95 


4 


92 


3 


93.1 






91 


9 


91 


5 


93.1 


86 


3 


91 


6 


93 


11 92.9 






92 


4 


91 


6 


92.8 






94 


1 


92 


1 


92.5 






94 


1 


93 





92.5 


87 


4 


95 


2 


91 


4 


92.1 






91 


9 


92 


3 


90.9 






93 


9 


92 


1 


90.9 


88 


4 


91 


6 


90 


7 


90.7 


87 


3 


90 


9 


89 


1 


90.6 






89 


6 


88 


6 


88.9 






95 


8 


88 


6 


87.6 


85 


6 


88 


1 


88 


7 


84.4 






87 


2 


82 


4 


84.2 


88 


8 


t92 


7 


T91 


3 


t91.7 


88 


9 


93 





91 


6 


92.0 



For attendance in 1942, for counties arranged alphabetically see Table IX, page 194. 
* Before 1940 all Baltimore County high school pupils attended schools in Baltimore 
City. 

t Includes Baltimore County pupils who attended Baltimore City high schools at the 
expense of Baltimore County. 

Includes pupils in vocational schools nnd ninth yrrade in junior high schools. 



18 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 1 



NUMBER OF BOYS AND GIRLS ENROLLED* BY GRADES 
IN MARYLAND COUNTY SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1942 



Totel 

1941 

1942 



COLORED 



3976 



3455 

t\\\\\\V wl mig 



3396 



3186 



Total 
1941 
1942 
795 
961 

515468 
$16089 

14029 
14376 

14270 
14099 

14366 
14396 

14540 
14434 

14148 
14328 

14153 
14093 



1942 



MUTE 



Boys 



W7h Girls 



1.48S 



\1\Z 



3367 

3462 \vizz/////////A 



75 Special 1275 
71 Classes 1345 



H.S31 22838 Total 106411. *y,W 
n.o9t 22628 Elem. 107583 5-|,794 




II 



985° m 
to7 ll019° 



IV 



12554 
12496 

10342 
10440 

8848 
8804 

*7481 
♦7576 



m^//////////////////////m////////m//////m 



^5////////////////////////////////////////i 



33a 

ma//////////////////////j///////////> 



Zoa4 5136 Total 39225 »8.2.t3 

2978 5062 High 39316 *i,o4T 

,3fc,t 27974 Grandl4563 6 TA.oSTB 

K ° H 27690 Totall46899 T&.8+I 



f Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, and commitment to institution. Includes 
pupils enrolled in elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 
% Includes enrollment in junior first grade. 

* Includes 44 boys and 114 girls in 1941 and 20 boys and 41 girls in 1942, who were post-graduates. 
Includes pupils from Baltimore County who received instruction in Baltimore City high schools 
at the expense of Baltimore County. 



Grade Enrollment 



19 



Grand 
Total 


S°°g3 e^^cooo^^^^c^ ?E^-2^- S 


1 

1 

ia 




39,225 
39,316 

4,172 
2,619 
6,274 
238 

1,843 
1,297 
621 

2Ull 
1,261 
1,555 
740 
524 
3,170 
3,818 
497 
423 
665 
661 
2,619 
1,257 
819 

18,452 

5^093 
11,571 
1,788 

57,768 


m 


O0£ iO<N <*a> CO ■ O«0(MrH ^00 CO l> t- 00 


> 


is in-Sssa^iis»iis«S3»^ 3 : : a ; i 

t-t- CO CO 


ier of White H 
Ye 


5 


11 aS2*S3£HH3aB§3E;§gi5 i : : :i i a 

00 00 «H CO CO N 


a 


10,342 
10,440 

1,126 

687 
1,708 
59 
205 
480 
340 
173 

655 
334 
400 
204 
147 
812 
1,014 
130 
110 
154 
172 
708 
337 
196 

4,214 

4^214 
14,654 


I 


i— i 


12,554 
12,496 

1,247 
875 

2,099 
95 
247 
559 
413 
188 
267 
762 
416 
500 
211 
160 
999 

1,275 
156 
121 
206 
192 
836 
412 

5,809 

5^093 
716 

18,305 




Total 
Elemen- 
tary 


105,856 
107,063 

10,970 
6,368 

17,268 
749 
1,644 
4,346 
2,903 
1,493 
2,241 
6,219 
3,411 
4,209 
2,183 
1,071 

10,653 

11,529 
1,241 
762 
1,623 
1,373 

10,224 
2,942 
1,641 

°59,596 
°46,651 
1,864 
11,081 

166,659 




la S 

II 




I 


00 


§1 f::-:::;;LU:S: = :iiin 3 i i2 i ! s 

COCO *H iH iH ITS 10 OO 


z 


t- 


14,135 
14,068 

1,408 
878 

2,459 
94 
247 
602 
376 
192 
334 
831 
437 
557 
281 
160 

1,097 

1,453 
173 
98 
232 
182 

1,286 
453 
238 

5,654 
5^654 

19,722 


I 


to 


U il53SSES2s81ISSS5*8SaSS ■ • • • 5 




\o 


14,472 
14,342 

1,304 

2,416 
114 
225 
610 
420 
182 
325 
870 
414 
625 
296 
154 

1,211 

1,620 
177 
103 
260 
172 

1,272 
415 
219 

6,280 
6,280 

20,622 






14,275 
14,310 

1,213 
885 

2,407 
98 
255 
637 
387 
216 
324 
871 
473 
613 
272 
159 

1,259 

1,575 
178 
111 
225 
207 

1,328 
399 
218 

6,413 
6,413 

20,723 


i 


CO 


S8 &38§82£g88§gi3i8ESgaSS§ S3 i ! i ! "S 


i 




13,956 
14,282 

1,307 
858 

2,424 
88 
191 
613 
412 
235 
285 
875 
486 
631 
266 
125 

1,242 

1,692 
172 
121 
206 
192 

1,274 
372 
215 

6,793 
6,793 

21,075 






9 15,118 
1 15,758 

1,521 
959 
2,728 
119 
234 
8 563 
514 
241 
304 
920 
616 
671 

!3 289 
125 
1,404 
1,946 
188 
124 
234 
201 
1,233 
412 
212 

7,649 
7,649 

>1 23,407 




r 


: ... :a : «| 






ii . * ; ;s : f II : : : : 1 

co« 


County 


Total Counties, 

*1941 

*1942 

A'legany* 

Anne Arundel .... 

Baltimore* 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George s . . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 
St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Baltimore City f . . 
Elementary .... 
Occupational . . . 
Junior High . . . 

Senior High 

Vocational 

Total State 



t-<N ^ 



I 



f 

III 



20 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



§3 

OH 



CD 



wo 



in d 

,2 s 

C fa 



int> h co <o os ■«*< in os t- to h to co h co in h co o o t> co os to oo in os 

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Year 


Total 
High 


tOCO 

com 

r-IO 

in in 

o o 


«D5)HN(OOlN!ONOOOOOO»«DINHOO)OrfOO 
Tf cOHHHrtCOCOHH HCO^HNNN -<4< CO 


3,545 


1,146 
1,964 
435 


8,598 


OOLS IN 


> 


00 t- 
ON 

oo t> 

o 


HiflNHNNNtO'tNM CO in t- H in CO COCO 


• 

m • 


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1,271 


K 
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W 

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H 

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pa 


III 


°985 
°1,019 


H^tpHcococooo^co^HcotocoH^T?5^oco 


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°600 


1,619 


l-H 


°1,382 
1,450 


cocom^HOcocoeoHrj<Tj<ini>cooT}<osTi<cocoin 

NNOMinNMOOiOWH^OiOTfTft-IOHOa 


o • 
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00 • 


. . © . 

■ co • 

■ • oo • 


2,270 


Nuw 


1— 1 


°1,961 
1,857 


oorj<ost>HcocoHcocooo3050scoH-<i<t--Ti<incoo 

NOW©CO'>tNOC>«lTfiOeOM'1 l t-HOOHmN 


1,146 


1^146 


| 3,003 



ost}< m t> oo os m t)< c- r-< m ti< os os os (N os os os t- ^ o os eo t-oscoco 

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Colored Enrollment by Grades; Graduates and Non Promotions 21 



TABLE 15 



County White and Colored Elementary School Graduates and Non-Promotions 



Year 


Number 


fPERCENT 
















Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 



*°§County White Elementary School Graduates 





3,200 


4,136 


7,336 


6 


1 


8.5 


7.2 


1925 


3,705 


4,549 


8,254 


7. 





9.4 


8.1 


1927 


4,290 


5,059 


9,349 


8 


1 


10.3 


9.1 


1929 


4,742 


5,186 


9,928 


8 


9 


10.4 


9.6 


1931 


4,757 


5,156 


9,913 


8 


7 


10.2 


9.4 


1933 


5,121 


5,653 


10,774 


9 


i 


10.9 


10.0 


1935 . 


5,190 


5,719 


10,909 


9 


3 


11.1 


10.1 


1937 


5,292 


5,703 


10,995 


9 


6 


11.2 


10.4 


1939 


5,845 


6,080 


11,925 


10 


6 


12.Q 


11.3 


1940 


5,901 


6,266 


12,167 


10 


8 


12.4 


11.6 


1941 


5,845 


6,423 


12,268 


10. 


7 


12.6 


11.6 


1942 


5,921 


6,493 


12,414 


10 


7 


12.6 


11.6 



§County Colored Elementary School Graduates 



1923 


350 


637 


987 


2.3 


4.3 


3.3 


1925 


487 


705 


1,192 


3.4 


5.0 


4.2 


1927 : 


542 


909 


1,451 


4.0 


6.8 


5.4 


1929 


733 


1,077 


1,810 


5.5 


8.4 


6.9 


1931 


884 


1,101 


1,985 


6.7 


8.6 


7.6 




805 


1,105 


1,910 


6.1 


8.6 


7.4 


1935 


874 


1,190 


2,064 


6.9 


9.7 


8.2 


1937 


793 


1,130 


1,923 


6.5 


9.7 


8.1 


1939 


909 


1,100 


2,009 


7.6 


9.6 


8.6 


1940 


944 


1,178 


2,122 


8.0 


10.4 


9.2 


1941 


881 


1,134 


2,015 


7.5 


10.2 


8.8 


1942 


919 


1,115 


2,034 


8.0 


10.0 


9.0 



♦JCounty White Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 



1923 


13,435 


8,586 


22,021 


25.6 


17.5 


21.7 


1925 


10,673 


6,336 


17,009 


20.2 


13.0 


16.8 


1927. . 


9,954 


6,134 


16,088 


18.7 


12.4 


15.6 


1929 


9,147 


5,609 


14,756 


17.1 


11.3 


14.3 


1931 


9,231 


5,293 


14,524 


16.8 


10.4 


13.7 


1933 , 


10,503 


6,244 


16,747 


18.6 


12.0 


15.4 


1935 


9,283 


5,447 


14,730 


16.5 


10.5 


13.6 


1937 


9,200 


5,390 


14,590 


16.6 


10.5 


13.7 


1939 


7,571 


4,198 


11,769 


13.7 


8.2 


11.1 


1940 


7,253 


3,822 


11,075 


13.2 


7.5 


10.5 


1941 


6,949 


3,736 


10,685 


12.7 


7.3 


10.1 


1942 


6,753 


3,534 


'10,287 


12.2 


6.9 


9.6 



{County Colored Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 



1923 


5,722 


4,616 


10,338 


38.3 


31.1 


34.7 


1925 


4,800 


3,700 


8,500 


33.2 


26.3 


29.8 


1927 


4,015 


3,091 


7,106 


29.5 


23.3 


26.4 


1929 


3,230 


2,361 


5,591 


24.2 


18.5 


21.4 


1931 


2,929 


2,022 


4,951 


22.4 


15.8 


19.1 


1933 


3,041 


2,230 


5,271 


23.2 


17.4 


20.3 


1936. 


2,848 


1,959 


4,807 


22.4 


15.9 


19.2 


1937 


2,601 


1,753 


4,354 


21.5 


15.0 


18.3 


1939 


2,604 


1,705 


4,309 


21.7 


14.9 


18.4 


1940 


2,335 


1,512 


3,847 


19.8 


13.3 


16.6 


1941 


2,196 


1,467 


3,663 


18.9 


13.2 


16.1 


1942 


2,292 


1,353 


3,645 


20.0 


12.3 


16.2 



f Percent of total elementary enrollment, exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, 
commitment, and death, who graduated or were not promoted. 

* Includes seventh or eighth grade promotions in junior high schools as graduates and 
seventh or seventh and eighth grade non-promotions in junior high schools as non -promotions. 

° In obtaining percentages, kindergarten enrollment is excluded. 

§ In obtaining percentages enrollment in elementary school (s) of State teachers 
college (s) is included. 

$ Enrollment in elementary school(s) of State teachers college(s) is excluded, but 
kindergarten is included. 



22 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 2 



PERCENT OF GRADUATES IN 1942 
COUNTY WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLIMENT* 



Number 



County Boys 


Girls 


Total and 5 


921 


6,493 


Co. Average 




Kent 


71 


83 


Caroline 


110 


126 


Wicomicot 


187 


238 


Queen Anne's 


84 


87 


Dorchester 


143 


154 


Somerset 


QQ 

oo 


126 


Worcester 


107 


109 


Carroll 


288 


279 


Frederick 


355 


452 


Anne Arundel 


407 


405 


Talbot 


84 


91 


Garrett 


233 


194 


St. Mary's 


47 


47 


Cecil 


186 


171 


Calvert 


42 


49 


Harford 


254 


249 


Prince George's 


650 


727 


Howard 


111 


141 


Charles 


84 


84 


Baltimoret 


903 


1,052 


Allegany*t 


587 


629 


Montgomery* 


442 


500 


Washington* 


458 


500 



Percent 
Boys 



^Percent 



Girls 



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$ Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment to institution, or death, and 
includes promotions from grade 7 in counties having 6-5 plan, and from grade 8 in counties 
having 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization. > ' ' 

t Enrollment in elementary school of State teachers college included. 

° Enrollment in kindergarten (s) excluded in obtaining percentage. 



Elementary School Graduates 



23 



CHART 3 



PER CENT OF GRADUATES IN 1942 COUNTY COLORED 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT* 

County Number 

Boys Girls _i Per Cent Boys 77777A Per Cent 



Girls 



Total and 
Co. Av.t 


919 


1115 


Cecil 


23 


26 


Wicomico 


77 


88 


Queen Anne's 


39 


27 


St. Mary's 


44 


46 


Carroll 


16 


16 


Frederick 


43 


57 


Charles 


59 


93 


Dorchester 


59 


62 


Caroline 


34 


31 


Somerset 


54 


80 


Montgomery 


87 


92 


Worcester 


41 


79 


Washington* 


12 


12 


Harford 


33 


39 


Allegany* 


10 


9 


Kent 


28 


28 


Howard 


24 


30 


Talbot 


32 


32 


Anne Arundelt 


al02 


al08 


Calvert 


22 


48 


Baltimore 


33 


55 


Prince George' st 


48 


77 



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t Includes pupils in elementary school of State Teachers College at Bowie, 
a Excludes 6 boys and 5 girls certificated, but not graduated. 
* County has 6-6 plan of organization. 

% Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment to institution, or death and 
includes promotions from grade 7 in counties having 6-5 plan and from grade 8 in counties 
having 6-6 plan of organization. 



24 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 1 



NUMBER AND PER CENT OF COUNTY WHITE ELEMENTARY" 
AND JUNIOR HIGH PUPILS THROUGH GRADE 8 NOT PROMOTED,* 1942 



County 



Total and 
^o. Average 

Caroline 

Washington 

Frederick 

Kent 

Montgomery- 
Carroll 
Queen Anne's 
Talbot 

Prince George's 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Cecil 

Howard 

Calvert 

Garrett 

Harford 

Anne Arundel 

Wicomico 

Allegany 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Baltimore 

Charles 



Number 
Boys Girls 



Per Cent 
Boys 



Per Cent 
Girls 



6753 

50 
S26 
208 

41 
506 
192 

59 

74 
594 

84 
115 
151 
138 

52 
264 
312 
477 
209 
843 

61 
156 
1656 
185 



3534 
21 
150 
125 
20 
219 
112 
34 
32 
328 
48 
70 
105 
74 
28 
122 
165 



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* Includes pupils in kindergartens and special classes considered not ready for advance- 
ment. 

Pupils in elementary schools of teachers colleges in Allegany, Baltimore and Wicomico 
Counties are excluded. 



Non Promotions of White and Colored Elementary Pupils 



25 



CHART 5 



NUMBER AND PER CENT OF COUNTY COLORED EIZ>IENTARY PUPILS 
MOT PROMOTED - 1942 



County 
Total & 
Co. Av. 

Q. Anne's 

Washington 

Wicomico 



Number 
Boys Girls 
2292 



Per Cent 
Boys 



U777A Per Cent 
Girls 



Cecil 

Montgomery 
Charles 



15 
103 

82 

Dorchester 74 
Allegany 14 
Talbot 53 
Frederick 54 
St. Mary's 61 
Somerset „ 
Worcester 
Harford 
Caroline 
Kent 
Howard 
Carroll 
Calvert 
A. Arundel* 400 
Baltimore 314 
P. George's* 47 5 



101 

98 
72 

64 
64 
63 
27 
109 



1353 111 



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33 SBP- t ^" < ^^ 

33 

18 

64 
222 
167 
331 





* Excludes pupils in elementary school of State Teachers College at Bowie. 



26 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 6 



r:o::-??.Df:o-ioN"s* by in coirrry iLrmTi^ aitd 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS THROUGH GRADE 8 FOR YEAR ENDING IN JUNE, 1942 
■ Per Cent Boys 



COLORED & 



No. 

3oys 

Girls 

536 



1285 

1\\\\\\\\\V\\W 157 




503 



267 

T^m\\\\\\\\\\'uz| l69 

286 

Li 

328 

1 

2 



■■a 



No. 
Boys 
Girls 

1591 
935 



g/////j Per Cent Girls 
WHITE 



1048 
518 



7////A 

795 " 

451 Lf 

675 

384 I « ///M l 



559 
346 



677 
329 



9^5 

252 

94 I 



* Excludes pupils in kindergartens and special classes not considered ready for advancement. Also 
pupils in elementary school classes at the four State teachers colleges are excluded. 



Non Promotions by Grade and in First Grade 



27 



TABLE 16 



Number and Percent of Non-Promotions in First Grade* in Maryland 
County White and Colored Schools, 1942 



White Schools- 
First Grade Non-Promotions 


County 


Colored Schools — 
First Grade Non-Promotions 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 










Total Counties: 










1,690 


1,065 


21.3 


15.1 


1940 


581 


395 


26.9 


20.4 


1,666 


954 


20.5 


13.2 


1941 


566 


394 


26.6 


21.6 


1,591 


935 


18.9 


12.7 


1942 


536 


334 


26.8 


18.1 


17 


14 


5.9 


5.1 






1 




2.4 


11 


5 


7.9 


5.3 




' "l 


1 


26!6 


6.7 


12 


8 


7.1 


6.6 


Cecil 


2 


3 


9.1 


12.0 


67 


35 


10.5 


5.9 




2 


2 


9.5 


12.5 


15 


10 


15.0 


8.9 




12 


10 


14.3 


9.3 


8 


7 


12.5 


11.5 


Dorchester 


17 


6 


20.2 


7.8 


18 


6 


17.1 


7.2 


Caroline 


12 


2 


27.9 


5.6 


61 


57 


12.7 


13.0 


Charles 


28 


15 


22.0 


13.0 


119 


62 


15.5 


9.7 


Frederick 


7 


10 


14.9 


21.3 


28 


27 


13.8 


12.9 


Talbot 


16 


7 


25.0 


11.3 


23 


19 


13.9 


13.7 


Worcester 


17 


15 


18.9 


17.9 


19 


9 


17.9 


9.5 




34 


21 


24.1 


15.6 


9 


9 


15.5 


13.6 


Howard 


11 


9 


22.9 


17.3 


206 


113 


19.4 


12.8 


St. Mary's 


19 


11 


24.1 


15.9 


104 


60 


21.0 


12.9 


Somerset 


29 


17 


25.4 


18.5 


72 


36 


21.2 


13.0 


Harford 


14 


15 


24.6 


24.6 


333 


172 


22.4 


13.9 


Carroll 


6 


3 


37.5 


15.0 


34 


12 


26.8 


11.2 


Prince George's . . . 


90 


46 


31.7 


19.8 


83 


57 


23.6 


17.9 


Calvert 


31 


24 


29.5 


26.4 


224 


120 


27.2 


17.2 




104 


63 


31.4 


26.0 


65 


59 


25.8 


22.5 


Kent 


24 


9 


44.4 


16.1 


22 


11 


33.3 


20.8 




60 


44 


40.3 


25.7 


41 


27 


31.3 


24.5 













County 



Total Counties: 

1940 

1941 

1942. 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Howard 

Washington 

Worcester 

Kent t ..... . 

Queen Anne's. . . . 

Frederick 

Montgomery 

Wicomico 

Dorchester 

Talbot 

St. Mary's 

Prince George's . . 
Anne Arundel 

Garrett 

Baltimore 

Somerset 

Harford 

Allegany 

Cecil 

Calvert 

Charles 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 



28 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 17 



Causes for Non-Promotion of County White Elementary Pupils Not Pro- 
moted by Year, 1929 to 1942, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Year 
County 


Total 
Not 
Promoted 


Percent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 


1 

All Causes 


Unfortunate Home 
Conditions and 
Lack of Interest 


Mental 
Incapacity 


Personal Illness 


Irregular At- 
tendance Not 
Due to Sickness 


Transfer from 
Another School 


tl4 Years or Over, 
Employed 


Late Entrance and 
Early Withdrawal 


Other Causes 


By Year 


1929 


14,731 


14.3 


4.3 


2.5 


1.9 


2.0 


.8 


1.1 


.4 


1.3 


1930. ... 


14,311 


13.8 


4.5 


2.7 


1.7 


1.5 


.8 


1.0 


.3 


1.3 


1931. 


14,505 


13.8 


4.8 


2.7 


1.6 


1.2 


.8 


.8 


.3 


1.6 


1932 


15,251 


14.3 


5.4 


2.7 


1.8 


1.2 


.8 


.7 


.3 


1.4 


1933 


16,727 


15.5 


5.8 


3.1 


1.5 


1.3 


.8 


.7 


.2 


2.1 


1934. 


17,818 


16.6 


5.8 


3.3 


2.4 


1.5 


.9 


.6 


.2 


1.9 


1935 


14,709 


13.7 


4.7 


2.5 


1.9 


1.3 


.7 


.8 


.1 


1.7 


1936 


14,751 


13.8 


4.9 


2.3 


1.7 


1.4 


.7 


.8 


.1 


1.9 


1937 


14,575 


13.7 


5.0 


2.1 


1.8 


1.3 


.8 


.9 


.1 


1.7 


1938 


12,520 


11.9 


4.5 


1.8 


1.4 


1.0 


.7 


.7 


.3 


1.5 


1939 


11,759 


11.1 


4.6 


1.6 


1.2 


.9 


.7 


.5 


.2 


1.4 


1940 


11,057 


10.5 


4.2 


1.6 


1.1 


.9 


.7 


.5 


.2 


1.3 


1941* 


10,685 


10.1 


3.8 


1.3 


1.1 


1.0 


.6 


.6 


.2 


1.5 


1942*. 


10,287 


9.6 


3.7 


1.1 


1.1 


1.0 


.6 


.6 


.2 


1.3 



By County, 1942 



Caroline 


71 


4.3 


1.5 


.6 


.6 


.2 


.1 




.2 


1.1 




476 


4.7 


1.8 


.3 


.5 


.6 


.2 


.9 


.1 


.3 




333 


5.4 


2.8 


.2 


1.3 


.4 


.3 


.3 


.1 




Kent 


61 


5.7 


2.6 


.4 


.5 


.5 


.1 


.5 




1.1 


Montgomery 


725 


6.8 


2.3 


.5 


.8 


.8 


.3 


.4 


.3 


1.4 


Carroll 


304 


7.0 


2.5 


1.7 


.4 


.5 


.7 


.8 




.4 


Queen Anne's ....... 


93 


7.5 


4.6 


.1 


.9 


.1 


.8 






1.0 


Talbot 


106 


7.7 


4.7 


1.0 


1.0 


.2 


.2 




!i 


.5 


Prince George's 


922 


8.0 


2.3 


2.1 


1.2 


.4 


.9 


.3 


.3 


.5 


Worcester 


132 


8.0 


3.4 


2.1 


1.1 


.1 


.1 


.7 


.1 


.4 


Dorchester 


185 


8.3 


3.3 


1.7 


.6 


.4 


.2 


.8 


.1 


1.2 


Cecil 


256 


8.8 


3.4 


1.3 


1.0 


.9 


.9 


.3 


.3 


.7 


Howard 


212 


9.7 


3.3 


.8 


1.4 


1.5 


1.0 


.4 


.4 


.9 


Calvert 


80 


10.7 


5.3 


.4 


.7 


.4 


.4 


.5 


1.1 


1.9 


Garrett 


386 


11.3 


4.4 


2.1 


1.5 


1.4 


.4 


.2 


.2 


1.1 


Harford '. 


477 


11.3 


4.6 


.3 


1.0 


2.2 


1.3 


.8 


.2 


.9 




723 


11.4 


3.7 


1.9 


1.2 


1.0 


1.0 


.4 


1.1 


1.1 




335 


11.4 


4.5 


2.4 


1.3 


.1 


.7 


1.6 




.8 




1,277 


11.6 


4.0 


2.1 


1.0 


1.3 


.2 


.4 


.3 


2.3 




100 


13.1 


5.0 


.5 


.9 


1.7 


1.3 


.4 




3.3 




220 


13.6 


6.8 


1.6 


1.6 


.9 


.6 


.3 


.1 


1.7 




2,547 


14.7 


6.1 


.2 


1.3 


1.7 


1.2 


.8 


.1 


3.3 


Charles 


266 


17.8 


8.0 


1.7 


2.8 


2.3 


1.7 


.6 


.3 


.4 



t 13 years, 1929 to 1931, inclusive. 

* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 



Causes for Non Promotion of Elementary School Pupils 



29 



TABLE 18 

Causes for Non-Promotion of County Elementary Pupils by Year, 1929 to 
1942 and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1912 



Year and 
County 



fTotal 
Not 
Promoted 



Percent op Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 



O C w 



^s 

<y 



5^ 

US 

O) ft 

^ s 



o 
So 



By Year 



1929 


5,588 


20.4 


5.5 


5.8 


2.3 


1.6 


*1.8 


.5 


1.3 


1.6 


1930 


5,643 


21.1 


7.0 


5.1 


2.6 


1.7 


*1.6 


.7 


.9 


1.5 


1931 


4,932 


18.5 


5.8 


4.4 


2.4 


1.8 


♦1.4 


.5 


1.0 


1.2 


1932 


4,952 


18.7 


6.6 


4.3 


2.4 


1.7 


1.2 


.3 


.8 


1.4 


1933 


5,266 


19.8 


7.8 


4.4 


1.8 


1.8 


1.1 


.4 


.8 


1.7 


1934 


5,310 


20.8 


7.3 


6.2 


2.2 


1.7 


1.2 


.5 


.5 


1.2 


1935 


4,797 


19.2 


6.4 


5.0 


2.1 


1.9 


1.3 


.5 


.5 


1.5 


1936 


4,660 


19.1 


6.7 


5.3 


2.0 


1.4 


1.3 


.6 


.5 


1.3 


1937 


4,350 


18.3 


6.6 


4.4 


2.4 


1.4 


1.3 


.5 


.4 


1.3 


1938 


4,484 


19.2 


7.9 


4.0 


1.7 


1.3 


1.2 


.7 


.7 


1.7 


1939 


4,303 


18.5 


8.5 


3.7 


1.6 


1.4 


.9 


.5 


.6 


1.3 


1940 


4,832 


16.6 


7.7 


3.2 


1.5 


.9 


1.0 


.8 


.6 


.9 


1941 


3,663 


16.1 


7.0 


3.0 


1.8 


.9 


1.0 


.7 


.5 


1.2 


1942 


3,645 


16.2 


7.5 


3.1 


1.4 


.9 


.9 


.6 


.4 


1.4 



By County, 1942 



Queen Anne's 


8 


1.5 


.7 


.4 




2 












.2 


Washington 


5 


2.2 


.5 


1.7 




















72 


6.2 


2.6 






8 


1.5 




.9 


A 






Cecil 


23 


6.6 


3.1 


2.6 




3 


.6 










.S 


Montgomery 


156 


9.4 


3.0 


2.8 


1 


1 






9 


.2 


.7 


.7 


Charles 


137 


10.1 


3.5 


3.6 




6 


!5 


1 


2 


.1 


.1 


.5 


Dorchester 


115 


10.6 


3.8 


.7 




9 


2.8 




.2 


.3 


.4 


.5 


Allegany 


21 


10.8 


4.1 


.5 




5 




2 


.1 






3.6 


Talbot 


87 


11.7 


5.3 


3.5 




2 


.3 




.1 


^3 


.9 


.1 




86 


12.2 


9.1 


2.4 




6 








.1 






St. Mary's 


96 


12.3 


5.1 


4.2 




2 


.3 




.3 




.1 


1.6 


Somerset 


166 


13.6 


4.4 


3.9 


1 





2.0 




.7 


1.0 


.2 


.4 


Worcester 


160 


14.0 


7.1 


.4 


1 


3 


1.2 


1 


7 


.3 


.3 


1.7 


Harford 


107 


14.7 


5.8 


4.5 


1 


1 




2 





.3 


.7 


.3 


Caroline 


86 


14.7 


9.7 


.7 


1 







1 


.4 


.5 


.8 


1.2 


Kent 


97 


15.7 


11.8 


.2 


1 





^8 




6 


.2 


.3 


.8 


Howard 


96 


16.0 


8.3 


3.2 




8 


1.2 


1 


2 


.3 


.3 


.7 


Carroll 


45 


16.4 


4.7 


7.3 


1 


8 


.7 


1 


5 




.4 




Calvert 


173 


16.5 


7.8 


3.3 


1 


7 




1 


2 


1.5 


.4 


.6 




622 


21.8 


10.3 


3.9 


2 


3 


1.2 




8 


.5 


.5 


2.3 


Baltimore 


481 


26.9 


11.7 


6.9 


1 


9 


.4 


1 


6 


1.1 




3.2 


Prince George's 


806 


28.0 


14.2 


3.6 


2 


6 


1.7 




7 


1.5 


'.1 


3.0 



t Excludes pupils at elementary school, Bowie State Teachers College. 
* Thirteen years or over employed. 



30 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 19 



Age*-Grade Distribution of Maryland County Boys Enrolled Nov. 1941 





GRADE 


YEAR 


AGE 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 | 7 


8 


Spec. 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


Post 
Grad- 
uate 



Maryland White County Boys 



5 and under 


1,864 


2 














1 












6 


5,061 


1,355 


5 


1 










15 












7 


1,287 


3,799 


1,042 


12 










35 












8 


257 


1,623 


3,498 


977 


15 








87 












9 


47 


485 


1,831 


3,186 


998 


14 






107 












10 


12 


108 


665 


1,871 


2,944 


985 


13 




110 












11 


4 


23 


189 


878 


1,815 


2,815 


934 


17 


128 


18 










12 


1 


11 


44 


317 


967 


1,780 


2,604 


295 


127 


567 


14 








13 




6 


13 


95 


398 


1,036 


1,861 


748 


94 


2,034 


526 


14 


1 




14 




1 


4 


18 


111 


478 


1,120 


421 


61 


1,931 


1,723 


433 


15 




15 




1 




3 


28 


132 


407 


202 


34 


1,027 


1,519 


1,478 


383 




16 










4 


7 


52 


32 


5 


320 


707 


1,294 


1,363 


3 


17 












1 


7 


5 




49 


188 


492 


1,060 


5 


18 














1 






2 


35 


126 


363 


3 


19 






















5 


25 


92 


2 


19+ 
























5 


14 


1 



Maryland Colored County Boys 



5 and under 


322 


1 


























6 


1,051 


210 


2 
























7 


440 


777 


193 


6 






















8 


117 


443 


605 


158 


7 








3 












9 


45 


192 


453 


552 


130 


7 






6 












10 


17 


80 


255 


487 


443 


139 


5 




10 












11 


10 


37 


119 


267 


458 


411 


124 




5 


9 










12 


6 


25 


68 


123 


251 


447 


351 


3 


8 


97 


7 








13 


2 


7 


22 


74 


147 


257 


392 


12 


6 


265 


79 


16 






14 


1 


1 


8 


25 


60 


168 


248 


4 


3 


241 


222 


66 


3 




15 






2 


13 


18 


41 


89 


4 


1 


129 


178 


153 


39 




16 








2 


3 


10 


21 


3 


1 


26 


74 


113 


116 




17 










2 




"3 






9 


15 


40 


73 




18 




















4 


1 


9 


19 




19 
























1 


7 




19+ 
























1 


4 





* Age for last birthday as of September, 1941. 



Age-Grade Distribution for County Boys and Girls 



31 



TABLE 20 



Age*-Grade Distribution of Maryland County Girls Enrolled Nov. 1941 





GRADE 


YEAR 


AGE 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


Spec. 


1 


11 


III 


IV 


Post 
Grad- 
uate 



Maryland White County Girls 



5 and under 


1,901 


3 














2 












6 


4,516 


1,597 


5 












10 












7 


891 


3,903 


1,344 


17 










15 












8 


128 


1,024 


3,680 


1,418 


19 


1 






25 












9 


19 


212 


1,165 


3,570 


1,343 


19 






50 












10 


5 


43 


344 


1,266 


3,504 


1,311 


13 




36 












11 


1 


16 


83 


452 


1,377 


3,379 


1,301 


20 


42 


27 










12. 


1 


3 


22 


121 


531 


1,439 


3,157 


368 


50 


804 


28 


1 






13. 


2 


3 


3 


25 


193 


677 


1,511 


874 


34 


2,633 


862 


18 






14 




1 


3 


12 


50 


214 


675 


333 


21 


1,908 


2,408 


742 


10 




15.. 










9 


43 


213 


103 


12 


715 


1,573 


2,068 


659 




16 












5 


27 


19 


1 


188 


542 


1,408 


1,901 


5 


17 










i 


2 


3 


2 




26 


120 


392 


1,187 


18 


18 




















2 


13 


68 


297 


3 


19 
























15 


50 


2 


19+ 
























3 


5 





Maryland Colored County Girls 



5 and under 


310 


3 






* 




















6. 


1,088 


235 


3 












1 












7 


335 


803 


268 


8 










1 












8 


70 


341 


721 


234 


ii 


1 






1 












9 


28 


120 


381 


655 


229 


12 






3 












10 


13 


36 


139 


408 


524 


204 


10 




2 












11 


8 


20 


68 


150 


451 


548 


217 




4 


20 










12 


6 


4 


31 


87 


184 


423 


467 


7 


7 


165 


8 


1 






13 


1 


4 


17 


42 


81 


175 


391 


11 


2 


402 


165 


16 






14 




4 


9 


19 


38 


78 


209 


5 


1 


311 


317 


123 


6 




15 


2 






2 


14 


21 


73 






111 


222 


248 


98 




16 








1 


2 


3 


14 






39 


91 


138 


203 




17 












2 


3 






10 


24 


39 


92 




18 










i 












6 


21 


18 




19 




















1 


1 


1 


8 




19+ 




















1 


1 




7 





* Age for last birthday as of September, 1941. 



32 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 21 



Number and Percent of Maryland County White Elementary Pupils 
Over-Age Nov. 1921, 1939 and 1941 



County 


Number Over Age 
1941 


Percent of White Elementary Pupils Over Age 


1921 


1939 


1941 


1941 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


County Average 


8,766 


4,470 


31.6 


14 


1 


12. 


5 


16 





8.8 


Allegany 


959 


437 


*27.9 


*13 


2 


*12 


7 


*16 


8 


*8.3 


Anne Arundel . . . 


464 


216 


*27. 1 


13. 


9 


10 


9 


14 


4 


7. 1 


Baltimore 


1,718 


916 


28.9 


17 


8 


15 


5 


19 


5 


11.2 


Calvert 


59 


40 


38.8 


15 


1 


13. 


3 


16 





10.6 


Caroline 


48 


18 


33.2 


6 


7 


4 





5 


7 


2.2 


Carroll 


468 


191 


33. 8 


16 





15 


3 


20 


6 


9.4 


Cecil 


255 


122 


35.6 


13 


5 


13 





17 





8.7 


Charles 


194 


89 


35.0 


19 


6 


19 


1 


23. 


9 


13.3 


Dorchester 


172 


111 


29. 1 


16. 


1 


12 


6 


15. 


2 


9.9 


Frederick. ...... 


330 


156 


35.7 


9 


5 


7. 


8 


10. 


4 


5.1 


Garrett 


378 


203 


46. 5 


17 


1 


16 


8 


20 


8 


12.4 


Harford 


372 


206 


33. 5 


14 


8 


13 


7 


17 


1 


10.1 


Howard 


304 


141 


39.6 


19 


4 


20. 


5 


25 


7 


14.2 


Kent 


78 


29 


27. 9 


13 


2 


9 


9 


13 


7 


5.7 


Montgomery .... 


429 


204 


33.4 


*7. 


4 


*6 


6 


*8 


5 


*4.5 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


866 


463 


27.6 


14 


4 


11 


8 


14 


6 


8.6 


86 


57 


27. 1 


11 


6 


11 


2 


13 


3 


9. 1 


St. Mary's 


86 


44 


43.6 


15 


5 


16 


7 


20 


6 


12.3 


Somerset 


142 


68 


31.7 


13 


4 


12 


9 


17 





8.6 


Talbot 


97 


64 


30.0 


12 


8 


11 


5 


13 


7 


9.3 


Washington 


827 


468 


*28.2 


*15 


4 


*12 


7 


*16 





*9.4 


Wicomico 


323 


176 


26.9 


14 


9 


16 


8 


21 


4 


12.0 




111 


51 


28.1 


11 


3 


9 


9 


13 


6 


6.2 


7 Grade Systems 


6,551 


3,361 


32.5 


14 


8 


13 


3 


16 


9 


9.3 


K 8 Grade Systems 


2,215 


1,109 


27.9 


12 


3 


10 


8 


13 


9 


7. 5 



Number and Percent of Elementary School Pupils Over-Age 33 



TABLE 22 

Number and Percent of Maryland County Colored Elementary Pupils 
Over-Age Nov. 1921, 1939 and 1941 



County 


Number Over Age 
1941 


Percent of Colored Elementary Pupils Over Age 


1921 


1939 


1941 


1941 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Average 


2,915 


1,815 


65 


6 


22 


7 


20 


7 


25.0 


16.2 


Allegany 


*57 


*18 


56 


2 


21 





*26 


4 


*37.1 


*14.6 


Anne Arundel . . . 


544 


345 


69 





29 


8 


31 





35.7 


25.7 


Baltimore 


348 


202 


57 


1 


32 


9 


57 


1 


39.1 


22.6 


Calvert 


169 


149 


72 


3 


38 


5 


30 


5 


34.4 


26.9 


Caroline 


53 


25 


73 


1 


15. 


2 


13 


6 


16.9 


9.6 


CarroU 


16 


17 


72 


6 


13 


2 


11 


9 


11.8 


12.0 


Cecil 


20 


18 


59 


2 


16 


5 


10 


7 


10.8 


10.7 


Charles 


171 


117 


62 


6 


23 


3 


21 


5 


25.8 


17.3 


Dorchester 


187 


48 


64 


7 


13 


6 


12 


7 


15.8 


9.3 


Frederick 


45 


27 


59 


5 


9 


6 


10 





12.3 


7.6 


Harford 


89 


43 


64 


4 


21 


8 


18 


3 


24.1 


12.2 


Howard 


66 


36 


71 


2 


19 


5 


17 


4 


20.6 


13.5 


Kent 


69 


28 


68 


9 


13 


4 


15 


6 


21.7 


9.2 


Montgomery 


153 


81, 


66 


2 


23 


2 


14 




17.8 


10.2 


Prince George's. 


481 


275 


64 


1 


25 


3 


25 


9 


31.8 


19.5 


Queen Anne's. . . 


38 


21 


68 


6 


7 





10 


4 


13.2 


7.4 


St. Mary's 


99 


80 


74 


5 


23 


9 


22 


7 


24.7 


20.7 


Somerset 


127 


93 


71 





19 





17 


9 


19.9 


15.8 


Talbot 


54 


43 


66 


8 


25 


6 


12 


6 


14. 1 


11.2 


Washington 


*13 


*9 


52 


8 


10 


9 


*9 


5 


*11.6 


*7. 5 


Wicomico 


133 


78 


58 


4 


20 


7 


15 


3 


21.2 


10.1 


Worcester 


83 


62 


63 


4 


15 


9 


12 


8 


15.0 


10.6 



* Eight elementary grades. 



34 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 23 — Program for Education of Physically Handicapped Children 
in Maryland Financed with State Funds in 1941-42 



County 



Home Teaching 



Pupils 



Teach- 



Expendi- 
tures 



Transportation 
to Regular Class 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Special Instruction 
in Hospital Schools 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Total 




Expendi- 


Pupils 


tures 


246 


$8,866.56 


48 


1,417.40 


10 


155.93 


48 


2,460.17 


1 


120.00 


2 


125.94 


8 


240.50 


9 


394.93 


3 


96.20 


4 


137.95 


14 


459.00 


Q 
O 


14<£ . oU 


9 


230.10 


7 


249.25 


3 


159.60 


23 


772.70 


18 


921.59 


6 


215.00 


2 


86.00 


3 




7 


56.50 


9 


396.00 


4 


29.00 


263 


10,000.00 


509 


cl8,866.56 



Total Counties. 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Pr. George's . . . 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester . . . . . 

Balto. City 

Total State 



90 

10 
3 
24 

r 

4 
5 
1 
3 
6 
1 
2 
3 
2 
10 



1 
4 
1 

132 
222 



$6,074.93 

669.40 
155.93 
1,591.74 



125.94 
240.50 
394.93 

96.20 
114.75 
459.00 

52.80 
223.30 
117.65 
159.60 
596.80 
648.59 



56.50 
342.30 
29.00 

2,299.20 

8,374.13 



$1,991.63 
748.00 



68 


43 


120 


00 






23 


20 


90 


00 


6 


80 


131 


60 


175.90 


273 


or 


215 


00 


86.00 




53 


70 



2,000.80 
3,992.43 



116 

21 
7 
19 

i 

4 
4 

2 



117 

233 



$800.00 



a800.00 



a Expenditures for teaching four children : two from Montgomery, one from Harford, and 
one from Washington Counties, at the Rehabilitation Institute, Reisterstown. 

b The teachers, for whom reimbursement of $5,700 was paid, instructed 117 Baltimore 
City and 112 county children under treatment in the City hospital schools. 

c The , remainder of the $20,000 State appropriation was spent for testing hard-of-hearing 
children in county schools ($519.84), and for administrative supplies and stenographic 
services ($613.60). 



TABLE 24— Special Classes for Retarded Children in Counties, 1941-1942 





White 


Colored 


County 






Average 






Average 




Number 


Enroll- 


Enroll- 


Number 


Enroll- 


Enroll- 




of 


ment 


ment Per 


of 


ment 


ment Per 




Classes 




Class 


Classes 




Class 


Total 1939-1940 


*52 


*1,080 


20.8 


3 


69 


23.0 


1940-1941 


*61 


*1,275 


21.3 


3 


75 


25.0 


1941-1942 


*63 


*1,345 


21.3 


3 


71 


23.7 




*15 


320 


21.3 


1 


20 


20.0 


Anne Arundel . . . 


4 


76 


19.0 










3 


62 


20.7 








Carroll.. . ...7 


T2 


38 


19.0 








Cecil 


§2 


40 


20.0 








Dorchester 


1 


20 


20.0 










3 


52 


17.3 










1 


24 


24.0 








Howard 


3 


57 


19.0 








Kent 


2 


48 


24.0 










°2 


49 


24.5 










5 


97 


19.4 










1 


21 


21.0 








Talbot ; 


2 


39 


19.5 










Ul 


268 


24.4 










4 


93 


23.3 


' ' 2 


' 'si 


25^5 




2 


41 


20.5 









* Six of these are in one school. Eight classes for seventh and eighth grade pupils at 
Allegany and Fort Hill High Schools are excluded. 

f One school had two classes § State aid of $500 was received for one class. 

° No state aid was received for these classes. 



Program for Handicapped Children 



35 



Home instruction was given in Baltimore City by 7 white and 2 
colored teachers to 44 white beys and 72 white girls and 51 colored boys 
and 20 colored girls too physically handicapped to attend school. Training 
in lip reading was supplied to 31 pupils in the regular grades in addition 
to those who were in the classes for the deaf. There were 456 pupils in 
the regular grades who received training in speech correction. 



TABLE 25 



Baltimore City Special Classes, Day Camp, and Craft School for Girls, 
Semester Ending June 30, 1942 



Kind of Class 


Number 

of 
Classes 


Net Roll 


Average 
Net Roll 


Percent 
of Attend- 


Promoted or 
§Making Satisfactory 
Improvement 








ance 


Number 


tPercent 



Physically Handicapped White Pupils 



Total and Average . . . 

Open Air 

Orthopedic. 7 

Sight Conservation . . 
Hearing Conservation 

Deaf , 

Mixed* 



26 


501 


504 


89.2 


426 


85 





2 


33 


41 


91.6 


27 


81 


8 


11 


247 


235 


89.2 


206 


83 


4 


4 


75 


79 


85.3 


58 


77 


3 


3 


44 


44 


91.0 


37 


84 


1 


3 


28 


30 


86.0 


24 


85 


7 


3 


74 


75 


92.0 


74 


100 






Socially Handicapped White Puipls 



Day Camp for Boys 


1 


44 


41 


82.4 






Crafts School for Girls 


1 


17 


15 


73.3 







Physically Handicapped Colored Pupils 



Total and Average. 

Sight Conservation . 

Orthopedic 

Open Air . 

Deaf 



8 


185 


180 


87.0 


136 


73 


5 


3 


82 


81 


85.9 


59 


.72 





3 


61 


61 


87.0 


45 


73 


8 


1 


24 


20 


90.0 


22 


91 


7 


1 


18 


18 


89.0 


10 


55 


6 



Mentally Handicapped White Pupils 



Total and Average. 



Opportunity . . 
Special Center. 
Shop Center . . 



125 


3,050 


3,092 


82 


5 


2,590 


84.9 


84 


2,121 


2,067 


83 


6 


1,846 


89.3 


3 


51 


51 


84 


6 


46 


90.2 


38 


878 


974 


75 


9 


698 


79.5 



Mentally Handicapped Colored Pupils 



Total and Average . 



Opportunity . . 
Special Center. 
Shop Center . . 



92 


2,355 


2,418 


78.2 


1,692 


71 


8 


55 


1,461 


1,459 


81.0 


1,103 


75 


5 


5 


95 


93 


78.5 


47 


49 


5 


32 


799 


866 


73.5 


542 


67 


8 



f Percent of net roll of classes involved. 

* Junior high class consisting of pupils with following deficiencies : orthopedic, 44 
sight, 18 ; cardiac, 14 ; and hearing.. 2. 

§ Making satisfactory improvement applies to the opportunity group. 



36 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 7 



PER CENT 1942 WHITE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE OF 1938 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GRADUATES 



Wh.H.S. 



County 


1942 


7° 


Total & 
Average 


7,176 


62.5 


Talbot 


141 


75.8 


St. Mary's 


86 


72.9 


Q. Anne's 


102 


71.3 


Montgomery* 


607 


70.7 


Wicomico 


249 


70.3 


Allegany* 


835 


69.5 


Harford 


295 


66.4 


Charles 


106 


65.4 


Kent 


79 


65.3 


Caroline 


163 


65.2 


Dorchester 


205 


64.5 


Baltimore 


1,062 


63.8 


Worcester 


158 


62.7 


A. Arundel 


426 


61.7 


P. George's 


629 


60.9 


Carroll 


364 


59.9 


Calvert 


35 


58.3 


Howard 


127 


58.3 


Cecil 


224 


56.3 


Frederick 


459 


56.0 


Washington* 


468 


52.3 


Somerset 


118 


52.0 


Garrett 


238 


52.0 



Era" 



[ML 



Boys 



I Girls 



* Pupils reported promoted from grade 8 of junior high or elementary schools in twelve 
grade systems were considered elementary school graduates. 

For number of graduates for individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



Persistence of Elementary School Graduates to 
High School Graduation 



37 



CHART 8 



PER CENT 1942 COLORED HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE OF 1938 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GRADUATES 



No. of C.H.S. 
Grads. 1942 



County Boys Girls Total 

Total & 256 
Average 



All. 

Carr. 

Balto.*, 

Dor. 

Wlc. 

Ceo. 

Sam. 

A. A. 

Talb. 
St. M. 
Harf. 
Mont. 
Chas. 

Caro. 
Wash. 
P. Geo. 
Fred. 
Kent 

Q. Anne's 
Calv. 
Wor. 
How. 



403 
7 



36. 8[ 
59.3^1 



16 49 -^ 



Per Cent Boys 



Per Cent Girls 





Baltimore County elementary school graduates of 1938 attended Baltimore City junior 
and senior high schools at the expense of Baltimore County. Since Baltimore City has a 
twelve-year course they could not graduate until 1943. In this case, however, 1942 high school 
graduates are compared with 1938 elementary school graduates although they actually graduated 
in 1937 from elementary school. 

For number of graduates for individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



38 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 26— Estimated Number and Percent of Colored and White 
Elementary School Graduates Who Graduated from High School 
Four Years Later, by Year 













Percent 








Percent 










White High 








Colored High 






White 


School Graduates 


Colored 


School Graduates 


Year of 


High School 


Are of Elementary 


High School 


Are of Elementary 


High School 


Graduates 


School Graduates 


Graduates 


School Graduates 


Graduation 








Four Years Before 








Four Years Before 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 




2,887 


1,071 


1,816 


39.4 


33.5 


43.9 


97 


34 


63 


9.8 


9.7 


9. ,9 


1928 


2,993 


1,142 


1,851 


39.5 


34.0 


44.0 


117 


42 


75 


10.3 


9.8 


10.6 


1929 


3,395 


1,339 


2,056 


41.2 


36.2 


45.2 


121 


50 


71 


10.2 


10.3 


10.1 


1930 


3,785 


1,534 


2,251 


43.8 


37.8 


49.0 


169 


63 


106 


13.0 


13.0 


12.9 


1931 


4,204 


1,713 


2,491 


45.0 


39.9 


49.3 


192 


77 


115 


13.2 


14.2 


12.7 


1932 


4,397 


1,772 


2,625 


47.0 


40.9 


52.2 


288 


124 


164 


18.9 


22.9 


16.7 


1933 


4,921 


2,114 


2,807 


49.6 


44.6 


54.1 


297 


117 


180 


16.4 


16.0 


16.7 


1934 


5,122 


2,220 


2,902 


50.5 


45.7 


55.0 


318 


128 


190 


18.5 


17.6 


19.1 


1935 


4,839 


2,052 


2,787 


48.8 


43.2 


54.1 


322 


142 


180 


16.2 


16.1 


16.4 


1936 


5,322 


2,283 


3,039 


49.2 


44.0 


53.8 


t374 


tl64 


f210 


tl9.0 


tl9.7 


U8.5 


1937. 


5,472 


2,361 


3,111 


50.8 


46.1 


55.0 


t392 


tl61 


t231 


t20.5 


t20.0 


t20.9 


1938 


5,930 


2,566 


3,364 


54.7 


49.1 


59.9 


t510 


t202 


t308 


t25.5 


t23.5 


t27.1 


1939 


6,306 


2,750 


3,556 


57.8 


53.0 


62.2 


t576 


t234 


t342 


t27.9 


f26.8 


t28.7 


1940 


6,813 


3,017 


3,796 


62.7 


58.5 


66.6 


t673 


t245 


t428 


t31.0 


f26.4 


t34.4 


1941 


7,038 


3,168 


3,870 


64.0 


59.9 


67.8 


t708 


t249 


f459 


t36.8 


t31.4 


t40.6 


1942 


7,176 


3,165 


4,011 


62.5 


57.3 


67.3 


t659 


t256 


t403 


t36.8 


t32.9 


t39.8 



f Includes Baltimore County graduates who attended Baltimore City high schools at the 
expense of Baltimore County. 



TABLE 27 

Number and Percent of County High School Graduates Who Entered State Teachers 
Colleges September after Graduation 



White 
High 
School 
Graduates 



Boys 



Girls 



White Entrants to 
State Teachers Colleges 
Fall Following Graduation 



Number 



Boys 



Girls 



Percent 



Boys 



Girls 



Year 



Colored 
High 
School 

Graduates 



Boys 



Girls 



Colored Entrants to 
State Teachers College 
Fall Following Graduation 



Number 



Boys 



Girls 



1,713 
1,772 
2,114 
2,220 
2,052 
2,283 
2,361 
2,566 
2,750 
3,017 
3,168 
3,165 



2,491 
2,625 
2,807 
2,902 
2,787 
3,039 
3,111 
3,364 
3,556 
3,796 
3,870 
4,011 



214 
174 
74 
88 
93 
131 
118 
151 
179 
141 
126 
74 



.8 
1.3 

.5 
1.5 
2.8 
2.1 
2.2 



8.6 

6 

2 

3.0 
3.3 
4.3 
3 

4.5 
4.9 
3.7 
3.3 
1.8 



1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 



77 
124 
117 
128 
142 
fl64 
tl61 
t202 
t234 
|245 
t249 
t256 



115 
164 
180 
190 
180 
t210 
t231 
t308 
f342 
t428 
t459 
t403 



20 
28 
17 
26 
15 
16 
30 
38 
21 

f40 
22 

t25 



t Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools after 
five years work above grade 7. 

For 1942 graduates and teachers college entrants for individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 

210 to 215. 



Persistence to High School Graduation; Entrants to 
Teachers Colleges 



39 



CHART 9 



WHITE GIRL GRADUATES OF COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS ENTERING 
MARYLAND TEACHERS COLLEGES THE FALL FOLLOWING GRADUATION 



County- 
Co. av. 125 



Number 
1941 1942 



Wic. 

Wore. 

Garr. 

Caro. 

Som. 

All. 

Wash. 

Dor. 

Talb. 

How. 

A. A. 

Balto. 

Cecil 

Harf. 

Fred. 

Mont . 

Calv. 

Carr. 

Chas. 

P. Geo.»8 

Q. Anne's 



26 
5 
3 
2 
4 
18 
10 

2 
2 
6 
18 
5 
4 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
5 



74 



6 

3 
2 
13 
7 
3 
2 
2 
4 
9 
2 
2 

3 
1 




For graduates and entrants to teachers colleges for individual high schools, see 
Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



40 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

CHART 10 







COLORED GIRL GRADUATES OF COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS 


ENTERING BOWIE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE THE FALL FOLLOWING GRADUATION 




Number Per Cent 


County 










1941 


1942 


1942 


Co. Av. 


24 


25 






Balto.* 




2 


13.3 


vac. 


3 


6 




P. Geo.'s 


6 


4 




All. 


2 


1 




Som. 


1 


3 




Calv. 




1 




Talb. 


1 


2 




Carr. 


2 


1 




Mont. 


1 


2 




St. Mary's 




1 




A. A. 


J 

2 


2 




Caroline 


2 






Frederick 


1 






Kent 


1 






Queen Anne's 


2 







For entrants to Bowie State Teachers College for individual high schools, see Table 
XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 

* Residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools. 



TABLE 28 — Comparison of Number and Percent of County White High 
School Graduates Continuing Education or Staying or Working 
at Home Year Following Graduation, 1926 to 1941 



Graduates 
op 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Number 


Percent 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1926 


1,045 


1,574 


507 


856 


88 


323 


48.8 


54.3 


8.5 


20.5 


1927 


1,071 


1,816 


472 


913 


99 


417 


44.1 


50.3 


9.3 


22.9 


1928 


1,142 


1,851 


480 


947 


118 


432 


41.8 


51.2 


10.3 


23.3 


1929 


1,339 


2,056 


527 


1,051 


125 


455 


39.3 


51.3 


9.3 


22.1 


1930 


1,534 


2,251 


542 


1,031 


223 


694 


35.3 


45.8 


21.5 


28.7 


1931 


1,713 


2,491 


574 


953 


361 


994 


33.5 


38.2 


21.2 


39.8 


1932 


1,772 


2,625 


471 


820 


495 


1,321 


26.6 


31.2 


27.9 


50.4 


1933 


2,114 


2,807 


469 


701 


447 


1,453 


22.2 


25.0 


21.1 


51.8 


1934 


2,223 


2,904 


522 


803 


473 


1,348 


23.5 


27.7 


21.2 


46.4 


1935 


2,052 


2,787 


498 


800 


367 


1,172 


24.3 


28.7 


17.9 


42.0 


1936 


2,283 


3,039 


613 


980 


244 


1,036 


26.9 


32.3 


10.7 


34.0 


1937 


2,361 


3,111 


652 


1,078 


354 


1,081 


27.6 


34.7 


15.0 


34.7 


1938 


2,566 


3,364 


745 


1,114 


347 


1,249 


29.0 


33. r 


13.5 


37.1 




2,750 


3,556 


761 


1,118 


254 


1,133 


27.7 


31.4 


9.2 


31.9 


1940 


3,017 


3,796 


*699 


*1,107 


147 


916 


23.1 


29.1 


4.9 


24.1 


1941 


J3.170 


J3.871 


621 


1,006 


115 


773 


19.6 


26.0 


3.6 


20.0 



• Includes 10 boys and 2 girls, duplicates in Anne Arundel who are simultaneously 
working and continuing their education. 

t Includes 2 boys and 1 girl who received certificates, but did not graduate. 



Occupations of 1941 High School Graduates 



41 



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TABLE 34 



Enrollment in Each Year of Last Four Years of Maryland County High 
Schools for White Pupils by Year, 1925-1942 



Year 


I 




III 


IV 


Post- 

VJI auua tc3 


Total 


1925 


6,772 


4,453 


3,281 


2,732 




17,238 


1926 7 . 


7,558 


4,777 


3,610 


2,748 




18,693 


1927 


7,871 


5,363 


3,856 


3,067 




20,157 


1928 


8,487 


5,636 


4,257 


3,178 




21,558 


1929 


8,587 


6,100 


4,694 


3,612 




22,993 


1930. ..: 


9,038 


6,292 


5,080 


3,981 


26 


24,417 


1931 : : : 


5,777 


6,969 
7,636 


5,490 


4,338 


21 


26,595 


1932 : . . . : 


9,662 


6,070 


4,646 


153 


28,167 


1933 


10,548 


7,658 


6,720 


5,207 


169 


30,302 


1934.: : 


10,629 


8,016 


6,381 


5,404 


91 


30,521 


1935. . . 7. . 


11,072 


8,162 


6,731 


5,110 


153 


31,228 


1936 


11,267 


8,749 


6,927 


5,526 


127 


"32,596 


1937 


11,267 


8,907 


7,456 


5,675 


93 


33,398 


1938 


11,256 


8,883 


7,586 


6,080 


113 


33,918 


1939 


12,064 


9,332 


8,062 


6,478 


198 


36,134 


1940 


12,206 


10,073 


8,352 


7,441 


186 


37,858 


1941 


12 , 554 


10,342 


8,848 


7,323 


158 


39,225 


1942 


12,496 


10,440 


8,804 


7,515 


61 


39,316 



For enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



TABLE 35 



Enrollment* in Various English Courses of White Pupils in Maryland 
County High Schools for the Year 1941-1942 



County 


I 


II 


English 
III 


IV 


V 


Journal- 
ism 


Public 
Speak- 
ing 


Total, 1940-41 


12,504 


10,484 


9,029 


7,392 


82 


151 


137 


1941-42 


12,616 


10,516 


8,946 


7,574 


' 67 


285 


f216 




1,380 


1,132 


922 


883 




120 






897 


706 


599 


472 


3i 








2,025 


1,742 


1,402 


1,127 




93 






95 


59 


48 


37 










246 


212 


208 


172 








Carroll 


561 


483 


418 


377 


6 






Cecil 


416 


336 


316 


239 










183 


177 


157 


108 










277 


296 


235 


218 


i5 








761 


641 


538 


472 










415 


334 


267 


245 










494 


409 


362 


307 










221 


201 


191 


136 










163 


145 


116 


88 






f2i6 




996 


823 


701 


654 




19 




1,303 


1,029 


862 


670 




53 




152 


128 


110 


106 










120 


111 


. 106 


86 










203 


156 


178 


130 








Talbot 


192 


172 


146 


146 










838 


708 


586 


482 


i5 








408 


309 


291 


245 








270 


207 


187 


174 









* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an 
institution. m _ %m _ 

t Includes 11 pupils taking business English. 



White Enrollment in English and Mathematics 47 



TABLE 36 

White Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics in the 
Maryland County High Schools, by Year 1932 to 1942, and by County, 

1941-42 



Year 
and 
County 


General 
Mathematics I 


General 
Mathematics II 


Algebra I 


Algebra II 


Plane Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Solid Geometry 


Mathematics Review 


Arithmetic Review 


Vocational and Ap- 
plied Mathematics 


Commercial and 
Business Arithmeticf 


Business Trainingf 


1931-32 


2,158 




8,455 


4,527 


4,020 


914 


456 


447 


641 


174 






1932-33 


2,462 




9,071 


4,272 


4,412 


965 


417 


646 


467 


166 






1933-34 


2,509 




9,082 


3,915 


4,507 


1,067 


560 


455 


807 


204 






1934-35 


3,881 




8,508 


3,865 


4,269 


713 


528 


260 


502 


193 






1935-36 


5,838 




7,384 


3,598 


4,183 


792 


533 


330 


418 


178 


447 




1936-37 


6,174 




7,292 


3,482 


3,938 


757 


500 


241 


339 


43 


284 




1937-38 


6,309 
°5,861 




7,172 


3,225 


4,033 


694 


558 


281 


161 


32 


983 




1938-39 


°1,182 


7,594 


3,255 


3,643 


676 


594 


136 


58 


208 


1,234 


80 


1939-40 


6,994 


1,360 


6,404 


3,400 


3,897 


764 


610 


133 


88 


436 


1,033 


355 


1940-41 


7,550 


1,512 


5,834 


3,057 


3,533 


727 


637 


184 


78 


475 


1,173 


818 


1941-42 


7,663 


1,503 


5,638 


2,717 


3,366 


667 


536 


167 


81 


685 


1,065 


360 



By County, 1941-42 





539 




669 


256 


325 


50 


72 




19 


148 


66 






592 


36 


352 


200 


220 


50 


45 






138 


270 






1,394 


283 


947 


593 


547 


125 


91 


26 




105 


78 


40 


Calvert 


59 


26 


36 


14 


22 


9 




9 




26 


22 






179 


87 


50 


78 


91 


14 














Carroll 


515 


55 


199 


88 


136 


11 




ii 




22 






Cecil 


238 


144 


187 


161 


74 


8 


8 


16 






60 


63 




120 




97 


44 


55 






46 








29 




255 


' 34 


74 


66 


120 


27 




26 






148 






506 




302 


147 


207 


39 


34 


5 








28 




267 


' 51 


191 


84 


37 


5 


7 








64 


28 




372 


232 


168 


121 


138 


41 


22 


23 






51 


16 




211 




14 




46 
















Kent 


103 


' 96 


56 


66 


36 












is 






379 


55 


593 


272 


308 


104 


103 






33 


34 


2i 




722 


115 


532 


264 


439 


94 


57 








112 






134 


65 


74 


19 


53 












3 


46 


St. Mary's 


27 


27 


50 


38 


35 












28 






178 


25 


42 


12 


52 












12 






156 




49 


17 


60 












51 


70 


Washington 


218 




750 


47 


230 


62 


69 






2i3 






Wicomico 


243 




206 


80 


96 


28 


28 








23 


19 




256 


i72 




50 


39 












25 





* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
° In 1938-39 general mathematics was separated for the first time into general mathematics 
I and II. 

t The enrollment shown includes all classes in business training taught by teachers 
certificated for mathematics. The remaining classes in this subject will appear in Tables 
37 and 41, pages 48 and 51. 



48 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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White Enrollment in Social Studies and Science 49 



TABLE 38 



White Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science in the Maryland 
County High Schools, by Year, 1932 to 1942, and by County, 1941-42 

















H * 










Year 
and 
County 


+- 
"c3 

0) 


-t— 

h- 1 

tc 

o 


i ted 
ence 1 


i ted 
ence I 


mistry 


8 

I 


£.2 


++ 

8 


++ 

0) C 


ogy II 


++ 

1 




c 

0) 

O 


"3 

m 






o 
O 




H- 


Seni 
Sci 


£ M 


s 


"3 
o 
N 


1931-32 


7,420 


6,156 






3,572 


2,284 












1932-33 


8,181 


6,831 






3,929 


2,429 












1933-34 


8,154 


6,785 






3,852 


2,248 












1934-35 


8,389 


7,453 






3,764 


2,490 












1935-36 


8,864 


7,996 






4,139 


2,284 












1936-37 


8,508 


8,248 






4,428 


2,250 












°1937-38 


8,737 


8,116 






4,060 


2,468 


°570 


69 






' 45 


°1 93 8-3 9 


9,396 


8,765 






4,502 


2,532 


°578 


242 


' 87 


' 77 


61 


1939-40 


9,733 


9,690 






4,179 


2,851 


571 


331 


161 


51 


41 


°1940-41 


9,261 


8,520 


lj433 


749 


4,513 


2,565 


°581 


742 


170 


68 


27 


°1941-42 


9,303 


8,784 


1,623 


514 


4,069 


2,923 


°13 


731 


26 


155 


28 



By County, 1941-42 



Allegany 


990 


1,032 


76 


57 


424 


203 .... 










Anne Arundel 


601 


581 


193 


10 


243 


146 




' 46 






' '28 


Baltimore 


1,512 


1,581 


76 




577 


294 




388 








Calvert 


46 


50 








82 












Caroline 


101 


202 


162 


' 95 


' 78 


64 








' '46 




Carroll 


482 


388 


53 




199 


155 








32 




Cecil 


397 


355 






151 


88 












Charles 


125 


143 


"50 




59 


55 








' '20 




Dorchester 


233 


305 


23 




94 


25 








20 




Frederick 


550 


528 






352 


367 












Garrett 


222 


219 


210 


"58 


101 


258 












Harford 


356 


309 


93 


54 


218 


206 












Howard 


128 


136 


90 


72 


58 


96 












Kent 


174 


100 






85 


15 














564 


756 


116 


' '45 


303 


247 








' 23 




Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


1,029 


727 


205 


34 


376 


160 




' 97 








154 


76 


39 




62 














St. Mary's 


112 


110 






10 


' 42 




"is 








Somerset 


196 


148 






61 


29 




45 


' 26 






Talbot 


109 


143 


' 34 




57 


33 








' '20 






594 


432 


203 


' 65 


217 


203 














413 


268 






268 


86 














215 


195 






76 


69 













* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

t Previously Related Science I and II were combined with General Science and 
Biology I, respectively. 

t If these courses were given prior to 1937-38, they were not reported separately. 

Bacteriology was taken by 6 pupils in 1937-38, 14 pupils in 1938-39, 13 pupils in 
1940-41 and 1941-42. 



50 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 39— Enrollment* of Maryland County White High School Pupils in 
the Foreign Languages for Years Ending June 30, 1925 to 1942 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


German 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1925 


2,076 


3,333 


1,411 


2,306 


38 


39 


8 


10 


1926 


2,154 


3,497 


1,400 


2,428 


31 


29 


6 


2 


1927 


2,335 


3,535 


1,379 


2,532 


24 


17 






1928 


2,494 


3,510 


1,420 


2,690 


19 


10 






1929 


2,271 


3,475 


1,656 


2,751 


34 


26 






1930 


2,338 


3,446 


1,567 


2,713 


46 


57 






1931 


2,534 


3,684 


1,598 


2,786 


22 


13 






1932 


2,559 


3,683 


1,762 


2,967 


53 


26 






1933 


2,421 


3,713 


1,989 


3,237 


46 


26 






1934 


2,460 


3,746 


1,850 


3,149 


30 


28 






1935 


2,272 


3,409 


1,601 


2,966 


36 


52 






1936 


2,106 


3,208 


1,604 


2,872 


36 


48 






1937 


2,141 


3,218 


1,589 


2,617 


36 


29 


io 


3 


1938 


2,115 


3,155 


1,545 


2,664 


34 


20 


27 


10 


1939 


2,249 


3,276 


1,547 


2,663 


25 


29 


17 


5 


1940 


2,115 


3,328 


1,468 


2,594 


33 


48 


5 


5 


1941 


1,965 


3,325 


1,409 


2,457 


58 


59 






1942 


1,856 


3,032 


1,168 


2,197 


163 


194 







TABLE 40— Enrollment* of Maryland County White High School Pupils in 
Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home Economics for Years 
Ending June 30, 1925 to 1942 



Year Ending June 30 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


Boys 


General 


Vocational 


1925 


4,338 




814 


6,266 


465 


1926 


4,256 




869 


6,595 


546 


1927 


4,905 


' 31 


922 


7,304 


618 


1928 


5,341 


39 


948 


7,797 


587 


1929 


5,528 


69 


929 


8,079 


516 


1930 


5,549 


201 


931 


7,690 


543 


1931 


6,107 


368 


1,100 


7,753 


566 


1932 


6,041 


418 


1,264 


7,461 


770 


1933 


6,380 


520 


1,260 


7,823 


720 


1934 


6,536 


410 


1,278 


7,908 


780 


1935 


6,873 


403 


1,389 


8,065 


1,040 


1936 


6,928 


772 


1,482 


7,259 


1,330 


1937 


7,489 


521 


1,644 


8,184 


1,324 


1938 


7,844 


578 


1,833 


8,105 


1,793 


1939 


8,318 


842 


2,049 


8,333 


2,613 


1940 


9,415 


892 


2,344 


8,903 


2,920 


1941 


10,196 


992 


2,355 


9,389 


3,287 


1942 


10,522 


1,100 


2,291 


9,850 


3,603 



For 1942 enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIV, pages 216 to 221. 



5 



Enrollment in Foreign Languages, Practical Arts and 
Commercial Subjects 



51 



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52 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 42— Enrollment* of Maryland County High School Pupils 
in Music, Art, and Physical Education for Years Ending June 30, 

1931 to 1942 





Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


Year 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1931 


7,119 


8,645 


315 


378 


3,594 


3,614 


1932 


7,031 


8,477 


671 


714 


3,976 


4,168 


1933 


7,714 


9,128 


741 


737 


4,722 


4,387 


1934 


7,465 


8,865 


529 


541 


4,601 


4,572 


1935 


7,461 


8,840 


537 


538 


4,813 


4,699 


1936 


7,526 


9,134 


418 


571 


5,413 


5,182 


1937 


7,579 


9,422 


535 


594 


5,483 


5,276 


1938 


7,333 


9,519 


910 


1,159 


5,793 


5,917 


1939 


7,840 


9,967 


1,534 


1,984 


6,935 


6,934 


1940 


7,978 


10,585 


1,836 


2,254 


8,216 


8,168 


1941 


8,635 


11,524 


2,105 


2,472 


9,226 


9,322 


1942 


8,652 


12,064 


2,536 


3,072 


10,534 


11.016 



* Excluding duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment and 
death. For 1942 enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIV, pages 216 to 221. 



Enrollment in Music, Art, Physical Education 



53 



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Washington .... 
Wicomico 



Failures and Withdrawals and Teachers by Subject 



57 



TABLE 47 

Number of County White Teachers Distributed by Subjects Taught in Last 
Four Years of High School, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Subjects 


Number of Teachers 
on Full-Time Basis 
Distributed by Time 
Devoted to Different 
Subjects* 


Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject 
or Service 

1942 


Number of Cases Where 
Teachers Instruct in More 
Than One High School 
Each Week or Term 


Approximate 
Number of 
Different 
Individuals 
Teaching 
Each 
Subject 
1942 


1941 


1942 


Teachers 


High 
Schools 


English 


244.1 


254.4 


148 






392 




215.7 


224. 5 








410 


Science 


186.3 


187.2 


148 


ai 


a2 


364 




159.9 


163.3 


148 


al 


a2 


323 




41.0 


37.4 


98 






98 


Latin 


39.8 


36.9 


77 






90 


Spanish 




2.7 


7 






8 


Library 


48.9 


42.8 


83 






97 


Commercial 


134.0 


137.7 


76 


1 


2 


160 




109.2 


119. 1 


129 


6 


14 


156 


Industrial Work 


98.8 


102.2 


100 


6 


14 


136 


Physical Education . . . 


63. 1 


64.9 


80 


10 


26 


142 


Music 


55.2 


58.0 


124 


24 


61 


104 




31.3 


34.7 


60 


8 


16 


53 


Art 


26.6 


28.3 


60 


12 


29 


44 


Administration and 
















81.5 


83.4 


139 


1 


2 


144 


Guidance 


19.0 


18.7 


69 






69 


Total 


1,554.4 


1,596.2 


148 









* Excludes time given to grade 7 or grades 7 and 8. 
a Teacher in Cecil taught mathematics and science ii 



two high schools. 



TABLE 48 

Number of County Colored High School Teachers Distributed by Subjects 
Taught, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Academic 
Subjects 



Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
Time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 



1941 



1942 



Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject, 

1942 



Special 
Subjects 



Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
Time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 



1941 



1942 



Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject, 

1942 



Social Studies . . . 

English 

Science 

Mathematics 

Latin 

French 

Library 

Administration 

and Supervision 
Guidance 



28.3 
27. 1 
27. 1 
23. 7 
.7 
1. 1 
2.0 

7.2 
.7 



29.2 
29.0 
26.5 
25.1 
.8 
.3 
2.0 

7.4 
1.1 



Home Economics 
Agriculture .... 
Industrial Arts 
Physical Ed. . . . 

Music 

Art 

Total Academic 
and Special 
Subjects 



23.5 
9.7 

10.8 
6.1 
4.8 



172.8 



24.0 
13.5 
11.4 
7.9 



184.9 



58 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 49 



Number of Clerks Employed in County Schools, 1941-42 





Number of Clerks 






County . 






Total 


Average 






Salaries 


Annual 




1940-41 


1941-42 




Salary 


Total and Average 


29.0 


28.8 


$25,575.21 


$888.03 




10.0 


8.6 


$10,590.00 


$1,231.39 




7.0 


7.0 


5,169.00 


738.43 


Baltimore 


5.0 


5.8 


4,307.75 


742.71 


Anne Arundel 


2.0 


2.0 


2,104.92 


1,052.46 




1.0 


1.4 


1,400.00 


1,000.00 


Carroll 


1.0 


1.0 


780.00 


780.00 




1.0 


1.0 


600.00 


600.00 


Wicomico " 


1.0 


1.0 


421.36 


421.36 


Garrett 


1.0 


1.0 


202.18 


202.18 



TABLE 50 



Number of Certificates Issuedf in 1920-21, 1941-42, and 1942-43 





Number 


of Certificates Issued 


Grade of Certificate 










1920-21 


1941-42 


1942-43* 


Administration and Supervision: 








Administration and Supervision 


1 


1 






3 




3 






i 


2 






4 


1 


High School: 










8 


10 


5 




141 


203 


187 


Special 7.7.7. 7 7. 7 


35 


98 


92 


Vocational 


39 


38 


43 






59 


38 


Elementary: 






15 




19 


21 


Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education .... 




302 


391 


Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 






4 


Advanced First Grade 




hi 


96 


First Grade 


265 


5 


18 




289 








161 










24 


4 


Non-public First Grade 7 




8 


6 


War Emergency Certificates: 








Degree 








High School Teaching 






39 


Elementary School Teaching 






21 


Non-degree: 








High School Teaching 






6 


Elementary School Teaching 






34 



* Up to March 1. 1943. 

t To white and colored teachers. 



Clerks in County Schools; Certificates Issued; Certification 
of White Elementary School Teachers 



59 



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64 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 56 



Number and Percent of Teachers New to the Maryland County Schools 

1931 to 1942 





New to County 


Change 
in 


Number New to County Who Were 


Year 


Number 


Percent 


Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


But 

New to 
State 


In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
Another 
County 


From 
Other 
Type 
School 
in Same 
County 


Substi- 
tutes 



White Elementary School Teachers 



1931-32 


°275 


9.5 


—61 


210 


17 


32 


19 


5 


11 


1932-33 


°149 


5.3 


—81 


102 


2 


29 


10 


6 


10 


1933-34 


°174 


6.2 


—29 


115 


12 


30 


3 


5 


12 


1934-35 


°195 


7.0 


—13 


155 


10 


21 


7 


3 


6 


1935-36 


°166 


6.0 


—7 


115 


7 


33 


10 


3 


8 


1936-37 


°204 


7.4 


+ 14 


141 


19 


35 


10 


3 


6 


1937-38 


°207 


7.5 


—18 


82 


40 


52 


40 


4 


29 


1938-39 


°202 


7.4 


—20 


107 


22 


41 


18 


7 


25 


1939-40 


°203 


7.4 


—17 


106 


18 


49 


18 


4 


26 


1940-41 


°215 


8.0 


—6 


127 


29 


29 


19 


10 


20 


1941-42 


°359 


13.5 


+ 7 


142 


63 


83 


31 


4 


67 


White High School Teachers 


1931-32 


°247 


18.3 


+ 94 


172 


19 


50 


27 


2 


4 


1932-33 


a 134 


10.2 


—15 


81 


21 


23 


16 


1 


8 


1933-34 


°108 


7. .9 


+ 14 


70 


17 


14 


9 


i 


6 


1934-35 


°172 


12.2 


+36 


122 


17 


28 


16 


3 


2 


1935-36 


°205 


14.0 


+ 60 


149 


17 


20 


16 


8 


11 


1936-37 


°199 


13.3 


+ 50 


123 


36 


26 


13 


8 


6 


1937-38 


°241 


15.0 


+ 88 


129 


66 


21 


25 


10 


15 


1938-39 


°233 


13.8 


+ 85 


144 


37 


16 


25 


13 


23 


1939-40 


°255 


14.4 


+ 72 


156 


38 


17 


19 


13 


31 


1940-11 


°269 


15.0 


+47 


173 


44 


33 


20 


7 


12 


1941-42 


°451 


24.3 


—16 


233 


111 


51 


25 


30 


26 



Colored Elementary School Teachers 



1931-32 


°115 


15.4 


—6 


85 


5 


22 


24 




3 


1932-33 


°103 


13.9 


—7 


78 


6 


16 


13 




3 


1933-34 


°73 


10.2 


—14 


48 


8 


12 


25 




5 


1934-35 


°96 


13.2 


+8 


74 


1 


20 


13 




1 


1935-36 


°70 


9.7 


—3 


57 


2 


9 


31 




2 


1936-37 


°57 


8.2 


—9 


39 


5 


12 


32 




1 


1937-38 


°47 


6.9 


—23 


35 


1 


7 


21 




4 


1938-39 


°50 


7.5 


—18 


40 


4 


5 


25 




1 


1939-40 


°57 


8.8 


—17 


42 


3 


11 


22 




1 


1940-41 


°41 


6.6 


—15 


3Q 


2 


7 


7 




2 


1941-42 


°60 


10.1 


—9 


37 


5 


9 


5 


1 


8 



Colored High School Teachers 



1931-32 


°35 


38.5 


+ 9 


28 


5 


2 








1932-33 , . . 


°28 


29.5 


+ 3 


21 


1 


6 








1933-34 


°15 


15.8 


+2 


11 


3 








1 


1934-35 


°20 


19.4 


+ 8 


17 


1 


i 






1 


1935-36 


°25 


22.3 


+6 


15 


4 


1 






5 


1936-37 


°28 


23.9 


+ 9 


21 


6 








1 


1937-38 


°38 


27.7 


+ 18 


30 


8 




8 






1938-39 


°35 


23.2 


+ 14 


27 


5 


2 


8 




'i 


1939-40 


°39 


22.8 


+ 19 


29 


3 


1 


10 


4 


2 


1940-41 


°42 


24.0 


+ 7 


32 


7 


1 


6 


4 


2 


1941-42 


°42 


21.4 


+ 5 


27 


7 


4 


3 





° Excludes teachers who transferred from county to county. 



Turnover by Year, and by County for White 
Elementary Teachers 



65 



TABLE 57 



Number and Percent of White Elementary School Teachers New* to the 
Schools of Each Individual County During the School Year 1941-42 



County 


New to 
County 


Change in 
Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Num- 
ber 


Per- 
cent 


Inex- 

enced 


But 

New 

to 
State 


E 

In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preceding 
Year 


xperience< 

From 
An- 
other 
County 


1 

From 
High 
School 
in Same 
County 


Substi- 
tutes 


Total and Average 


°359 


13.5 


+ 7 


142 


63 


83 


31 


4 


67 


Oi jpn Annp'q 






1 














Worcester 






—1 














Cecil 


2 


2A 


—2 


2 














2 


2.4 


—3 


2 














1 


2.6 















i 


Dorchester 


2 


2.9 


—2 






i 






1 


Carroll 


5 


4.3 


—6 


2 










3 


Calvert 


1 


4.5 





1 












Kent 


2 


5.7 


—1 






2 








Talbot 


3 


7.5 


—3 


i 




1 






i 




19 


7.5 


—9 


4 


i 


4 


"l 




3 


Washington 


18 


7.8 


—8 


8 


1 


5 


2 








14 


8.4 


—7 


5 




5 


3 




i 




5 


8.8 


+ 1 


3 




2 








St. Mary's 


3 


11.1 


+ 1 


1 




2 










5 


12.5 


+3 


3 


i 












7 


14.6 


—4 


4 


l 




i 




i 


Baltimore 


65 


17.9 


—11 


33 




15 


3 




14 


Garrett 


19 


18.3 


—1 


11 




7 


1 






Anne Arundel .... 


33 


20.6 


+ 11 


16 


h 


4 






5 


Harford 


29 


24.2 


+ 6 


11 


3 


10 


2 




3 


Montgomery 


68 


29.6 


+ 14 


21 


24 


6 


5 




11 


Prince George's . . 


87 


30.4 


+30 


14 


25 


18 


7 




23 


Baltimore City 




















Elementary and 




















Occupational . . . 


*252 


18.0 


+35 


112 


t42 


37 


56 


5 




Entire State 


°611 


15.0 


+42 


254 


U05 


120 


87 


9 


67 



* Teachers in grade 7 and 8 of junior or junior-senior high schools are excluded from 
this table. They are included in Table 58, page 66. 

Excludes teachers who transferred from one county to another, but includes transfers 
from county to City. 

t Includes 4 who formerly taught in private schools. 



66 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 58 



Number and Percent of White Regular, Senior High, Junior High, and Junior- 
Senior High School Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual 
County During the School Year, 1941-42 



County 


New to 
County 


Change in 
Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Num- 
ber 


Per- 
cent 


Inex- 
peri- 
enced 


But 

New 

to 
State 


In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preceding 
Year 


• 

xpenence 

From 
Another 
County 


From 
Ele- 
mentary 

School 
in Same 
County 


Substi- 
tutes 


Total and Average 


°451 


24.3 


— 16 


233 


111 


51 


25 


30 


26 


Calvert 


1 


10.0 


+ 1 




1 












6 


10.9 





3 


1 


i 


i 






Frederick 


16 


15.8 


—3 


7 


2 


4 


1 




i 


Kent 


4 


16.7 





4 












Carroll 


16 


17.8 





9 


4 


1 


2 






Cecil 


11 


18.0 


+ 4 


7 


2 


1 






i 


Harford 


13 


18.6 


+3 


8 




4 


i 








8 


19.0 


—5 


3 




5 








Caroline 


9 


19.1 


—2 


7 


i 








i 


Dorchester 


9 


19.6 


+ 1 


3 


5 




i 






Baltimore 


52 


24.1 


—7 


27 


13 


2 


5 




5 


Allegany 


54 


24.4 


+ 3 


18 


13 


14 


2 


4 


3 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


7 


25.0 


—1 


5 


1 










Talbot 


9 


25.7 


—3 


5 


1 






3 




Montgomery 


67 


27.8 


—22 


33 


24 


3 


4 


2 


i 


Somerset 


9 


29.0 





6 




2 






1 


Washington . 


44 


29.3 


+ 3 


12 


10 


4 


i 


14 


3 


Garrett 


16 


31.4 


—3 


8 


3 


4 








Charles 


10 


34.5 


+ 1 


9 


1 










Prince George's. . 


56 


35.7 


4-9 


24 


18 


2 


3 


2 


7 




13 


38.2 


+ 3 


11 




1 


1 






Anne Arundel .... 


38 


38.8 


+3 


15 


11 


2 


3 


4 


3 


St. Mary's 


9 


45.0 


—1 


9 












Baltimore City . . . 


101 


7.6 


—15 


74 


12 


5 


6 


4 




Senior High 


20 


4.0 


—11 


14 


3 


1 




1 




Junior High . . . 


66 


10.5 


—15 


49 


6 


4 


5 


2 




Vocational. . . . 


15 


13.6 


+ 11 


11 


3 






1 




Entire State . . , 


°552 


17.9 


—31 


307 


123 


56 


31 


34 


26 



° Excludes teachers who transferred from one county to enother, but includes transfers 

from county to City. 



Turnover of White High School Teachers; Colleges Which Trained 67 
High School Teachers 



TABLE 59 

Maryland Students Who Completed in June, 1941, at Colleges Indicated, 
the Education Courses Necessary for Certification Compared with 
the Number of Graduates Who Took Positions in the County 
High Schools in the Fall of 1941 * 



College 



Western Maryland College 
University of Maryland . . . 

Washington College 

Hood College 

Goucher College 

St. Joseph's College 

Johns Hopkins University . 
College of Notre Dame 



Number of Graduates 



Who Met Requirements for 
Certification from 


Who Received 
Maryland County 
High School 
Positions* 


Maryland 
Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


50 


11 


45 


61 


24 


31 


18 


1 


9 


7 




7 


4 


4 


3 


3 


5 


2 


i 


7 
8 





* According to reports from colleges. 



68 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 60 



Number and Percent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the 
Elementary Schools ot Each Individual County During the School Year, 

1941-42 





New to 




Number New to County Who Were 




County 


















Change 
in 






Experienced 








Number 










County 






of 

Teaching 


Inex- 




In 








Num- 


Per- 


Positions 


peri- 




Counties 


But 






ber 


cent 


October 


enced 


From 


but Not 


New 


Substi- 








to s. 




Another 


Teaching 


to 


tutes 








October 




County 


Preceding 
Yeaf 


State 




Total and Average . 


°§60 


10.1 


— 9 


37 


5 


9 


5 


8 


Cecil 






—1 












Dorchester 






















































Kent 


















Montgomery 


















Queen Anne's 






—2 












Washington 






—2 












Wicomico 






—2 














§ i 


7!i 














Worcester 




8.0 




i 




i 






Anne Arundel 


7 


8.6 


+2 


3 




2 




2 


Charles 


3 


9.1 


+ 1 


1 


' 1 


1 






Prince George's . . . 


8 


9.4 




3 


1 


1 


3 




Carroll 


1 


12.5 




1 












2 


13.3 




1 


i 








St. Mary's 


4 


18.2 


—2 


4 










Talbot 


4 


20.0 


—2 


2 


i 


i 






Allegany 


1 


25.0 


—1 






i 








12 


30.0 




5 




i 




6 




8 


32.0 




4 


i 




2 




Somerset 


12 


40.0 




12 










Baltimore City 


















Elementary and 


















Occupational — 


81 


12.5 


+ 16 


56 


8 


7 


no 




Entire State 


°§141 


11.4 


+7 


93 


13 


16 


15 


8 



° Excludes teachers who transferred from one county to another, but includes transfers 

from county to City. 

§ Includes one teacher who came from high school into elementary school not shown 
elsewhere. 

f Includes 4 who formerly taught in private schools. 



Turnover of Colored Teachers 



69 



TABLE 61 



Number and Percent of Colored High School Teachers New to the High 
Schools of Each Individual County During the School Year, 1941-42 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 








Change 
in 




Experienced 




vUUN 1 X 






Number 














of 
















Teaching 


Inex- 




In 








Per- 


Positions 


peri- 




Counties 


But 




r 


cent 


October 


ence 


From 


but Not 










to 




Another 


Teaching 


to 








October 




County 


Preceding 


State 














i ear 




Total Average 


*°42 


21.4 


+ 5 


27 


3 


4 


7 


Kent 
































St. Mary's 
















Dorchester 


i 


9.'i 




i 








Worcester 


l 


10.0 




l 








Allegany 


§i 


16.7 












Calvert 


l 


16.7 












Charles 


2 


16.7 












Carroll 


1 


20.0 












Cecil 


1 


20. 




i 










1 


20.0 




l 










4 


22.2 


+i 


2 






2 


Talbot 


2 


22.2 


—l 


1 








Howard 


1 


25.0 


+i 










Harford 


2 


28.6 




2 










§4 


36.4 


+i 


2 








Frederick 


3 


37. 5 




2 








Somerset 


4 


40.0 


■fi 


4 








Washington 


§§2 


40.0 


+i 










Caroline 


3 


42.9 




i 








Wicomico 


7 


43.8 




5 






2 


Montgomery 


4 


44.4 


+i 


2 






2 


Baltimore City 


35 


12.6 


+26 


23 


2 


2 


8 




4 


4.8 


+6 


3 






1 


Junior High 


t29 


17.3 


+20 


20 


2 


2 


t5 


Vocational 


2 


7.7 











2 


Entire State 


*° 77 


16.2 


+31 


50 


5 


6 


15 



* Includes four teachers who came from elementary into high school not shown elsewhere. 
° Excludes teachers who transferred from one county to another, but includes transfers 
from county to City. 

§ Includes one teacher who came from elementary school into high school not shown 
elsewhere. 

f Includes one teacher who came from other type school in Baltimore City. 



70 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 62— County Teachers in Service October, 1941, Who Attended 
Summer School in the Summer of 1941 





Teachers Employed Oct., 










1941 Who Attended Sum- 










mer School in 1941 




Number on 














County- 


County 










Summer 


Staff 




Number 


Percent 


School Attended 


















Ele- 






Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 




mentary 


High 



White County Teachers 



Total White 


**t780 


°t401 


29 


4 


21 


6 


Allegany 


86 


33 


34 


1 


14 


9 


Anne Arundel 


35 


22 


21 


9 


22 


4 


Baltimore 


113 


55 


31 


1 


25 


5 


Calvert 


5 


2 


22 


7 


20 





Caroline 


13 


10 


34 


2 


47 





Carroll 


40 


27 


34 


5 


30 





Cecil 


17 


18 


20 


5 


29 


5 




11 


3 


27 


.5 


10 


3 


Dorchester 


*25 


°14 


36 


2 


30 


4 




53 


22 


31 


9 


21 


8 


Garrett 


43 


10 


41 


3 


19 


6 




30 


10 


25 


.0 


14 


3 




*16 


8 


28 


1 


23 


5 


Kent 


7 


4 


20 


.0 


16 


7 




84 


f76 


36 


. 5 


31 


4 


Prince George's .... 


70 


29 


24 


5 


18 


5 


9 


1 


23 


.1 


3 


6 


St. Mary's 


t5 


2 


18 


5 


10 





Somerset 


16 


5 


33 


.3 


16 


1 


Talbot 


11 


4 


27 


5 


11 


4 


Washington 


57 


26 


24 


.7 


17 


3 




23 


12 


28 





21 


8 




11 


8 


23 


.4 


19 






Total 

University of Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University 

Western Maryland College .... 

Columbia University 

Montgomery County Workshop 

Duke University 

University of Delaware 

Pennsylvania State University . 
Shepherd State Teachers College 
George Washington University . 

Cornell University 

University of Maine 

Temple University 

University of Wisconsin 

Catholic University 

Baltimore County Workshop . . 

Madison College 

Fairmont State Teachers 

College 

University of West Virginia 

Northwestern University 

University of Virginia 

52 Others 



783 


403 


434 


114 


*130 


19 


60 


70 


*31 


27 


22 


*30 


12 


17 


16 


3 


4 


14 


11 


1 


6 


°6 


1 


10 


5 


6 


4 


7 


1 


8 


1 


6 


2 
6 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 




5 




4 


t27 


46 



Colored County Teachers 



Total Colored 


ttt238 


91 


39.5 


47.6 


Allegany 


3 


2 


60.0 


33.3 


Anne Arundel 


45 


9 


57.0 


52.9 


Baltimore 


7 


4 


17.5 


40.0 


Calvert 


5 


3 


20.0 


50.0 


Caroline 


7 


5 


50.0 


71.4 


Carroll 


2 


2 


25.0 


40.0 


Cecil 


5 


4 


50.0 


80.0 


Charles 


tl3 


7 


40.6 


58.3 


Dorchester 


tl5 


6 


53.6 


54.5 


Frederick 


12 


5 


63.2 


62.5 


Harford 


8 


2 


34.8 


28.6 


Howard 


7 


2 


46.7 


66.7 


Kent 


3 


1 


18.8 


20.0 


Montgomery 


26 


4 


60.5 


50.0 


Prince George's .... 


f25 


6 


29.4 


33.3 


Queen Anne's 


3 


3 


14.3 


60.0 


St. Mary's 


8 


5 


33.3 


55.5 


Somerset 


9 


5 


30.0 


55.5 


Talbot 


5 


2 


22.7 


20.0 




1 


1 


16.7 


25.0 




16 


4 


48.5 


25.0 




13 


9 


52.0 


90.0 



Total Number Attending . . 

Morgan State College 

Hampton Institute 

Howard University 

Temple University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Columbia University 

Catholic University 

Virginia State College 

Tuskegee 

New York University 

University of Pittsburgh . . . 

Miami University 

Virginia Union University . 
15 Others 



241 


91 


tU65 


28 


21 


14 


19 


11 


7 


5 


3 


7 


4 


5 


8 




2 


2 




4 




3 


i 


1 




2 




2 


t8 


7 



* Excludes attendance officer. 

t Excludes supervisor. 

° Excludes superintendent. 



Summer School Attendance and Average Number Belonging 71 

per Teacher 



>? 



o 

« 

a q 
p z 



SB 



is 



a « 

O <D 

to 



DO 



4 ca 
* cv 



CO CO CO CM CJ t- O 00 <M •OOSTfOHOOMOOONMtO 00 05 lO • • tJ< 

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CO OJCO^^^COCO^COCO •COCOCOCOCOCMCOCOCOCOC0^3 , CO CO CM • • CO 

U3 rj< 00 t- 00 O O CC lO © t- • C- t> CM © r-l rj< OS t- CM 00 © lO • • W © lO 

us co t> to oo cm t}« eo t- oo eo • oo m © © cm © © © 10 co © cm • -Ti<t- t* 

cm r-t cm cm ri cm cm cm cm cm cm • cm <m eo co cm cm th co cm r-i cm cm cm • • cm r-t cm 

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© CM CM CO *0 C- CO 00 O CO 00 tH tf5 lO TP U3 CM 00 lO C- CM © © ©C-© • • © 

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Tji Ti<t-Tf iocM©om©<MooeocM©cocMCMt-m^i , iocoi-i ■«* 

c- eo oo Tj< t}< oo © co oo t- oo © co © eo rH © io io co co t- co c- 

eo co co ■<* co co eo eo eo eo eo co eo eo eo eo eo eo eo eo eo eo co eo eo 

C- CO © CO C- © lO CM Tj< © CO •»!> CO 00 CM CD © © CM T}i f- f- C- 

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eo t^m©©©r-i©©©cMcoT-i^H©©eoc-©©©Ti<cM© cm • -co© eo 

CM CM CM CO CM r-l CM CM r-t CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM r-4 CM CM CM CM CM r-l CM ■ • CM r-l CM 



2 M o 




72 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 11 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF WHITE PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (GRADES 1 - 7 OR 8) 



County 
Co. Ay. 

Balto.* 

P. Geo.'s 

A. A. 

How. 

Fred. 

Chas. 

Caro. 

Wash. 

Cerr. 

Wic* 

Cecil 

Som. 

Calv. 

All.* 

Harf. 

Garr. 

Dor. 

Talb. 

Q. Anne's 

Wore. 

Mont. 

Kent 

St. Mary's 
Balto. City 
State 




40.9 
56.6 
S6.6 
35.3 
37.7 
35.2 
36.4 
35.1 
35.3 
37.5 
32.3 
34.7 
34.0 
34.4 
32.1 
31.9 
32.9 
33.3 
34.1 
34.1 
32.8 
33.3 
26.4 



42.1 
37.7 
37.6 
35.4 
37.7 
35.1 
35.5 
35.2 
35.6 
36.5 
33.4 
35 

34.5 
33.6 
32.9 
32.4 
32.4 
32.7 
33.0 
33.9 
32.9 
33.0 
27.6 



32.9 t33.2 
34.6 34.9 






•Excludes elementary school at State Teachers College. . 
t The corresponding figures for junior high schools, 25.0 in 1942, 26.5 in 1941 and ^6.9 
in 1940 are not included with figures above for grades 1-6. _ 

Worcester County in 1942 should read 33.0 instead of 31.8 and should rank 16 instead of 20. 

For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 204. 



Average Number of Pupils Belonging per White Teacher 



73 



CHART 12 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF WHITE PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 



County 
Co. Av. 

Balto. 

All. 

A. A. 

Wash. 

Garr. 

P. Geo.'s 

Fred. 

Wic. 

Harf. 

Carr. 

How. 

Wore. 

Calv. 
Dor. 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Cecil 

Somerset 

Mont. 

Talb. 

Chas. 

Caro. 

Q,. Anne f s 

Balto. City 
State 



IN LAST FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL 
1940 1941 1942 
24.5 24.1 




*26.9 *25.6 
25.1 24.5 



* Data for senior high schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures 
for vocational schools: 16.2 in 1942, 19.5 in 1941 and 20.7 in 1940; and for junior high 
schools: 25.0 in 1942, 26.5 in 1941 and 26.9 in 1940. 

Worcester County in 1942 should read 19.8 instead of 20.8 and should rank 20 instead of 
12 and the county average 23.3 instead of 23.5. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 205. 



74 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 13 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF COLORED PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
IN ELEiia-JTAEY SCHOOLS ( GRADES 1-7 OR 8) 



County 


1940 


1941 


Co. Av. 


55.3 


55.7 


Wore . 


38. £ 


41.7 


Belto. 


41.9 


42.4 


Calv. 


41.7 


41.1 


Cero. 


36.5 


41.1 


Ches. 


34.2 


57.3 




57 .1 


57 .5 


How. 


35.4 


38.4 


Kent 


57.4 


36.4 


Mont . 


38.9 


56.7 


Dor. 


32.2 


52.9 


Fred. 


35.5 


56.6 


Wie. 


35.4 


54.4 


A. A.* 


34.8 


55.0 


Cecil 


30.7 


32.5 


Talb. 


35.0 


33.1 


P. Geo.«s* 


35.6 


32.8 


St . Mary's 


50.8 


31.8 


Carr. 


35.5 


34.9 


Wash. 


31.5 


32.7 


Harf . 


30.4 


31.8 


All. 


34.5 


32.7 


Q. Anne's 


28.8 


27.1 


Balto. City 


36.5 


t37.0 


State 


55.8 


36.4 





* Excludes elementary school of Bowie State Teachers College, 
f The corresponding figures for junior high schools: 28.5 in 1942, 
11.2 in 1940, are not included with data for grades 1-6. 
For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 208. 



31.1 in 1941 and 



Average Number Belonging per Colored Teacher 75 
CHART 14 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF COLORED PUPILS PER TEACHER AND 
PRINCIPAL IN LAST FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL 



1940 1941 1942 
27.5 27.2 




Belto. City *27.7 *27.6 
State 27.6 27.3 



$ Before September 1939 Baltimore County high school pupils attended high schools in 
Baltimore City. After three county one-year high schools were started, only those county 
pupils who had started their courses in Baltimore City high schools prior to Sept. 1939 
continued going to the City high schools. 

* Data for senior high schools only. Includes Baltimore County pupils whose tuition 
was paid by the county. Excludes corresponding figures for vocational schools: 17.0 in 1942, 

15.1 in 1941 and 23.3 in 1940; and for junior high schools: 28.5 in 1942, 31.1 in 1941 and 

31.2 in 1940. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 209. 



76 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 64 



Average Number of Pupils Belonging per County Teacher and Principal 

1923-1942 



Year 


Average Number Belonging 
per White Teacher and 
Principal in 


Average Number Belonging 
per Colored Teacher and 
Principal in 


Elementary 
Schools* 


High 
Schools 


Elementary 
Schools* 


High 
Schools 


1 Q9Q 


31.7 


20.0 


38.3 


15.2 


1924 


31.5 


19.8 


35.9 


14.8 




32.1 


20.1 


35.7 


16.8 


1926 


32.0 


20.3 


34.6 


19.0 




32.3 


20.4 


34.0 


19.9 


1928 


32.8 


21.0 


33.7 


21.5 


1929 


32.9 


21.5 


33.3 


23.1 


1930 


33.6 


21.6 


33.0 


25.0 


1931 


34.0 


21.9 


33.3 


25.2 


1932 


34.9 


22.3 


34.0 


25.0 




36.2 


24.4 


34.9 


26.7 




36.1 


24.8 


35.0 


26.3 


1935 


36.1 


24.7 


34.0 


26.5 


1936 


35.8 


25.1 


33.2 


29.8 


1937 


35.4 


24.9 


33.3 


30.7 


1938 


35.2 


24.0 


33.7 


29.6 


1939 


35.6 


24.2 


34.9 


28.0 




35.5 


24.5 


35.3 


27.5 


1941 


35.8 


24.1 


35.8 


27.2 


1942 


36.0 


23.3 


36.3 


25.5 



Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 



TABLE 65 — Average Annual Salary Per County Teacher and Principal 

1923-1942 



Year 


Average Salary Per White 
Teacher and Principal in 


Average Salary Per Colored 
Teacher and Principal in 


Elementary 
Schools 


High 
Schools 


Elementary 
Schools 


High 
Schools 


1923 


S990 


$1,436 


$513 


$906 


1924 


1,030 


1,477 


532 


835 


1925 


1,057 


1,485 


645 


808 


1926 


1,103 


1,517 


563 


891 


1927 


1,126 


1,534 


586 


908 


1928 


1,155 


1,544 


602 


897 


1929 


1,184 


1,557 


621 


879 


1930 


1,199 


1,550 


635 


874 


1931 


1,217 


1,559 


643 


882 


1932 


1,230 


1,571 


653 


856 




1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 


1934 


1,122 


1,394 


595 


784 


1935 


1,135 


1,398 


602 


790 


1936 


1,202 


1,469 


636 


817 


1937 


1,220 


1,488 


653 


821 


1938 


1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1939 


1,314 


1,595 


846 


997 


1940 


1,360 


1,605 


906 


1,018 


1941 


1,387 


1,618 


993 


1,103 


1942 


1,427 


1,639 


1,124 


1,290 



Average Number Belonging and Average Salary per County Teacher 77 



CHART 15— Average Salary Per County White and Colored Elementary 
and High School Teacher and Principal 1925-1942 




400 



200 



1325 1927 1323 1331 1333 1335 1337 1333 1M1 



78 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 16 



AVERAGE SALARY PER WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 



County 


1933 


1940 


1941 


Co. Av. 


$1231 $1360 $1387 


Balto. 


1453 


1535 


1571 


Mont . 


1266 


1576 


1622 


All. 


1314 


1371 


1437 


Fred. 


1139 


1330 


1360 


Wash. 


1168 


1363 


1376 


Carr. 


1095 


1293 


1317 


Q. Anne's 


1183 


1293 


1300 


A. A. 


1270 


1369 


1379 


Dor 


1104 


1259 


1269 


Kent 


1175 


1282 


1278 


Talb. 


1121 


1279 


1271 


Cecil 


1226 


1310 


1333 


Wic. 


1143 


1270 


1271 


St. Mary's 


1099 


1278 


1285 


P. Geo.'s 


1231 


1253 


1283 


How. 


1104 


1248 


1248 


Wore . 


1118 


1243 


1249 


Chds. 


1100 


1223 


1245 


Caro. 


1115 


1286 


1249 


Garr. 


1144 


1241 


1247 


Calv. 


1150 


1252 


1270 


Harf . 


1151 


1220 


1225 


Sora. 


1119 


1219 


1244 


Balto. City 


1701 


1897 


tl942 


State 


1405 


1543 


1572 




f Excludes $2,082 per junior high school principal and teacher in 1941, $2117 in 1940, 
and $1897 in 1933. 

$ Excludes $2,122 per junior hijrh school principal and teacher in 1942. 

County average in 1942 should read $1427 instead of $1429. 

Worcester in 1942 should read $1324 instead of $1323. 

For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 204. 



Average Salary per White Teacher 



79 



CHART 17 



AVERAGE SALARY PER WHITE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 
1942 Per Per Principal 



County 


Prin- 


Teach- 


and T 




cipal 


er 


1941 


Co. Av. 


|2670 $1535 


nei8 


Balto. 


3064 


1835 


1870 


Mont . 


3548 


1732 


1834 


Wash. 


2950 


1756 


1822 


A. A. 


2770 


1590 


1593 


Celv. 


2650 


1505 


1575 


Harf . 


2668 


1465 


1585 


Chas. 


2486 


1410 


1550 


All. 


3079 


1476 


1620 


Q. Anne' 


3 2330 


1420 


1609 


Carr. 


2544 


1456 


1507 


Fred. 


2793 


1474 


1533 


Som. 


2363 


1446 


1509 


Kent 


2225 


1422 


1528 


Talb. 


2413 


1429 


1513 


Wic. 


2350 


1422 


1484 


Cecil 


2275 


1426 


1517 


Dor. 


2275 


1413 


1469 


Garr. 


2442 


1392 


1498 


Wore. 


2330 


1376 


1453 


Caro. 


2750 


1311 


1552 


How. 


2413 


1331 


1475 


P. Geo.'s 


2496 


1371 


1438 


St. Mary' 82500 


1264 


1445 


Bait. City* 3742 


°2600 


t£597 


State 


2754 


1806 


1861 




Excludes following average salaries in Baltimore City junior high and vocational schools : 
* 1942 per principal : junior high $3,442 ; vocational $3,452. 
° 1942 per teacher: junior high $2,081; vocational $2,011. 
$ 1942 per teacher and principal : junior high $2,122 ; vocational $2,102. 
t 1941 per teacher and principal : junior high $2,117 ; vocational $2,130. 

Worcester County should read for 1942 $1,371 instead of $1,376 per teacher, and 
$1,492 instead of $1,503 per teacher and principal. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 205. 



80 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 18 



AVERAGE SALARY PER COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER 



County 
Co. Av. 



1933 1940 1941 1942 
$ 657 | 906 $ 993 




Balto. City 1614 1821 tl836 
State 1056 1360 1418 



f Excludes $1,929 per junior high school principal and teacher in 1941, $1,984 in 1940 
and $1,996 in 1933. 

$ Excludes $1,922 per junior high school principal and teacher in 1942. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 208. 

The new salary schedule affecting salaries of colored teach- 
ers enacted as Chapter 515 of the laws of 1941 took effect as of 
January 1, 1942. 



Average Salary per Colored Teacher 



81 



CHART 19 



AVERAGE SALARY PER COLORED HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 

1942 Per Per Principal 
Prin- Teach- and Teacher 
cipal er 1941 1942 
$1742 $1192 $1103 




B*0to.City 4173 
State 1881 1673 1737 



Excludes following average salaries in Baltimore City junior high and vocational 
schools : 

1942 per principal : junior high $3,152 ; vocational $3,890. 

1942 per teacher: junior high $1,883 ; vocational $2,124. 
$ 1942 per teacher and principal : junior high $1,922 ; vocational $2,190. 
t 1941 per teacher and principal: junior high $1,929; vocational $2,120. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 209. 



82 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Rank in Average Salary Per Teacher 
and Principal 


spoqas nv 


1 


CM rH rHrH HHH HHNNH rH CM 




sjoouos 
A"JB;uaui8i3 paiop3 




HHH rHCM rHrH ,-1 rH rH rH (M CM 




Colored High 
Schools 


jBdpuud 
puB jaqaBaj, 




i-otfio^acotoioas^H -CM^t>ea.ococ^CMXCM©rH 




TBdpUUcI 




Nt-iOOUOf KX!D ■C-NC.HM«XSrtTfeCH 

rHrHrHrHrH ■ rH CM rH rH rH CM rH CM 




jaqoBaj, 




H-<f Lioxt-iaawn -(MHOcox^'-ccgtONOH 




spotps 




CM i-l rHrH CMCMrHrH rH HNrt rH rH 




White High 
Schools 


IBdpuiJj 
pnB jaqoBaj, 




X^rHOOOC 0t >t>rHX<OrHCOCMCMO>eOCM^CO>-OC>> 

NHH rH r-l rH CM r-l CM CM rH rH HH 




IBdpnuj 




^-c-ssss-a.os^ssass'ss ..... 




jaqoBaj, 








Average Salary Per Teacher and Principal 


siooqos TTV 


i mmmmmmmmmm 


sjooqos pajopo nv 


$1,162 

1,521 
1,272 
1,390 
1,032 
1,088 
1,116 
1,238 
1,077 
1,026 
1,157 

1,137 
1,010 
1,116 
1 , 553 
1,123 
1 , 080 
1,045 
1 , 007 
1,085 
1,440 
1,024 
1,011 

1,961 
$1,590 


spoqos a^tqM 11V 


| IggilHiiSHiSilglllSlH § : : : : g 


spoqos 
A"JB;uama|a paaopo 


$1,124 

1,364 
1,237 
1,379 

986 
1,041 
1 ,035 
1,173 
1,024 

969 
1,114 

1,104 
971 
1,044 
1 , 550 
1,0!) t 
1,043 
989 
973 
974 
1,340 
966 
959 

U,869 
1 , 856 
1,922 

J$l,549 


Colored High 
Schools 


p3dpaU(j 
pus iaqoBaj, 


$1,290 

1,823 
1,441 
1,437 
1 , 223 
1,179 
1,285 
1,369 
1,217 
1,173 
1,266 

1,261 
1,207 
1,348 
1,564 
1,275 
1,239 
1,194 
1,119 
1,339 
1,727 
1,144 
1 , 140 

|2 , 5515 

1,922 
2,576 
2,190 

t$l,762 


redpuuj 


$1,742 


iiisiiiiii : iii§~ii§i§i§ i m i 






jaqoBaj, 


$1,192 








i, 

r 


A\iB;uauia|g nv 


$1,427 

1,45(5 
1,382 
1,582 
1,308 
1,310 
1,403 
1,365 
1,314 
1,371 
1,446 
1,309 
1,295 
1,338 
1,369 
1,573 
1,340 
1,387 
1,349 
1,287 
1,367 
1,423 
1 ,356 
1,324 

f2,004 
1,951 
2,122 

J$l,666 


papBJQ 


$1,438 

1,458 
1,383 
1,582 
1,302 
1,307 
1,407 
1,368 
1,304 
1,383 
1,447 
1,319 
1,288 
1,349 
1,373 
1,567 
1,341 
1,408 
1,444 
1,298 
1,384 
1,436 
1,361 
1,311 

$1,438 


aaqoBaj^oMj, 


$1,395 

1,436 
1,352 
1,585 
1,335 
1,326 
1,400 
1,454 
1,383 
1,437 
1,467 
1,370 
1,366 
1,262 
1,389 
1,608 
1,342 
1,365 
1,325 
1,231 
1,379 
1,366 
1,295 
1,407 

$1,395 


jaqoBajL-auo 


$1,297 
1,368 

1,320 
1,287 
1,356 
1,304 
1,211 
1,269 
1,228 
1,259 
1,029 
1,546 
1,289 
1,295 
1,351 
1,244 
1,270 
1,321 
1,351 
1,350 

$1,297 


White High 
Schools 


p3dpuij < j 
pus JaqoBaj, 


1 








IBdpuuj 


$2,670 

3,079 
2,770 
3,064 
2,650 
2,750 
2,544 
2,275 
2,486 
2,275 
2,793 
2,442 
2,668 
2,413 
2,225 
3,548 
2,496 
2,330 
2,500 
2,363 
2,413 
2,950 
2,350 
2,330 

t3,638 

3,442 
3,742 
3,452 

t$2,789 


jaqoBaj, 


. . $1,535 

1,476 
. . 1 , 590 
. . 1,835 
. . 1,505 
1,311 
. . 1,456 
.. 1,426 
1,410 
1,413 
1,474 
1,392 
. . 1,465 
. . 1,331 
1,422 
. . 1,732 
1,371 
1,420 
1,264 
1,446 
1,429 
. . 1,756 
. . 1,422 
1,371 

. . t2,491 

2,08i 
. . 2,600 
2,011 

. . t$l,814 




County 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Montgomery .... 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 

Talbot 

Baltimore City . . 

Elementary . . . 
Junior High .... 

Total State 





Average Salary per Teacher; Size of Teaching 
Staff in Elementary Schools 



83 



TABLE 67 

Number of County Schools Giving Instruction in Grades 1-7 (8) Having 
Following Number of Teachers and Principals, School Year 1941-1942 



Number 






"3 


























b 


urge's | 


ne's | 








a 






of 

Teachers 

and 
Principals 


Total 


Allegany 


Anne Arun 


Baltimore 


S 

> 
O 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Is 
O 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


73 

i- 

CS 

□ 

* 


Kent 


s 

= 
c 
bi 

C 

c 


Prince Ge< 


Queen An 


St. Mary's 


91 

s 


Talbot 


Washingto 


Wicomico 


Worcester 



Schools for White Pupils 



Total Schools. . 


1 

595 


43 


25 


46 


6 


9 


21 


24 


10 


28 


32 


57^9 


13 


12 


39 


46 


15 


16 


14 13 


56 


19 12 


1.0-1.4 


162 


6 










5 


12 


2 


16 


2 


39 


15 


5 


a2 
6 


7 


5 


5 


7 


7 


6 


16 


b4 


1 


1.5-2.4 


110 


5 


4 


5 


2 


3 


2 


4 


2 


4 


9 


9 


11 


1 


4 


7 


3 


8 


1 


2 


12 


3 
3 


3 


2.5-3.4 


46 


1 


4 


5 


1 






1 




2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


2 


6 


3 


4 




1 


1 


4 


1 


3.5-4.4 


47 


3 




5 


2 


i 


2 






2 


7 


2 




1 




2 


3 


2 






2 


7 


2 


3 


4.5-5.4 


35 


1 


i 


2 




1 


1 








2 


1 


4 








6 










3 


2 




5.5-6.4 


30 


6 


l 


5 






2 


i 




1 




1 


1 


2 






2 






2 


i 


1 


1 


1 


6.5-7.4 


39 


4 




4 




2 


3 


3 




1 


4 


1 


3 


1 




4 


5 










1 




2 


7.5-8.4 


25 


2 


2 


4 






2 






1 


2 




1 


1 




1 


3 






2 




1 


i 


1 


8.5-9.4 


22 


2 




4 




1 


2 


1 




1 


1 










2 


3 






1 




1 






9.5-10.4 


15 


3 




1 






2 


1 






1 










1 


2 










2 


2 




10.5-11.4 


7 




i 


2 
























1 












1 


1 




11.5-12.4 


9 


3 


l 


3 
























1 


1 
















12.5-13.4 


5 


1 


















1 




i 








2 
















13.5-14.4 


8 


1 


i 


i 














1 










3 












i 






14.5-15.4 . 


7 




l 


























1 


1 










2 






15.5-16.4 


7 




l 
















1 




i 






1 


2 
















16.5-17.4 


4 




l 


i 
























1 












i 






17.5-18.4 . 


5 


2 




























1 












2 






18.5-19.4 


1 


1 














































19.5-20.4 


2 


1 






























i 
















20 . 5-or more . . 


9 


1 




4 
























3 












i 







Schools for Colored Pupils 



311 

145 
110 
21 
15 
11 
3 
2 

1 
1 



3 


39 


17 


17 


4 


6| 6 


19 


13 


9 




16 


8 


10 


19 


43 


17 


16 


12 


13 


2 


13 


9 


1 


14 


6 


12 




4 


3 


11 


7 


4 




12 


2 


7 


3 


14 


15 


9 


3 


10 


1 


6 


1 


1 


18 


7 


3 




1 


2 


6 


3 


4 




3 


5 


1 


10 


25 




6 


6 






3 


5 




1 






3 


1 


1 




1 








1 


1 


4 


1 


2 


1 




1 




3 




i 


4 


i 


i 








i 


1 










1 


2 


1 






i 








i 


1 


2 


l 


1 






i 








1 








1 






1 








2 






1 
































1 




1 
























1 




















i 
























1 






























1 










































































1 


























































1 





a Includes one school organized as a two-teacher school but having only grades 1-4 and 
included in other tables as a two-teacher school. 

b Includes one school having only grade 7 included in other tables as a graded school. 
See Table I, page 183, for number of schools. 



84 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 68 



Decrease in Teachers Employed in County One-Teacher Schools,* 1920-1942 



School Year 
Endino 
June 30 


County White Elementary Teachers 


Colored 


Elementary 


Teachers 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


1920 


9 QQ9 


1,171 


39.1 


683 


422 


61.8 


1921 


q no 7 


1,149 


37.8 


694 


408 


58.8 


1922 


Q f\rA 
O , U04 


1 , 124 


36 . 8 


708 


406 


57.3 


1923 


o nco 
o , Ubo 


1,093 


35.7 


712 


403 


56.6 


1924 


3,065 


1,055 


34.4 


728 


395 


54.4 


1925 


3,047 


1,005 


33.0 


721 


397 


55.1 


1926 


3,067 


956 


31.2 


728 


394 


54.1 


1927 


3,088 


898 


29.1 


725 


382 


52.7 


1928 


3,070 


823 


26.8 


734 


378 


51.5 




3,078 


739 


24.0 


734 


372 


50.7 


1930 


3,050 


663 


21.7 


733 


363 


49.5 


1931 


3,049 


586 


19.2 


739 


353 


47.7 


1932 


3,022 


489 


16.2 


727 


344 


47.3 


1933 


2,954 


407 


13.8 


718 


334 


46.5 


1924 


2,947 


377 


12.8 


708 


331 


46.7 


1935 


2,941 


365 


12.4 


714 


318 


44.5 


1936 


2,949 


342 


11.6 


709 


309 


43.6 


1937 


2,972 


324 


10.9 


697 


293 


42.0 


1938 


2,965 


289 


9.7 


677 


271 


40.0 


1939 


2,946 


260 


8.8 


658 


232 


35.3 


1940 


2,944 


209 


7.1 


644 


198 


30.7 


1941 


2,921 


184 


6.3 


627 


181 


28.9 


1942 


2,935 


160 


5.5 


611 


146 


24.0 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i. e., grades one to six, seven or eight. 



TABLE 69 — Number and Percent of Teachers and Pupils in *One-Teacher 
Elementary Schools in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Counties 



Schools For White Pupils 



Teachers in 
One-Teacher 
Schools 



Num- 
ber 



Per- 
cent 



Pupils in 
One-Teacher 
Schools 



Num- 
ber 



Per- 
cent 



Counties 



Schools For Colored Pupils 



Teachers in 
One-Teacher 
Schools 



Num- 
ber 



Per- 
cent 



Pupils in 
One-Teacher 
Schools 



Total and Average 

Anne Arundel. . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Frederick 

Prince George's. . . 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Montgomery 

Kent 

Wicomico 

Carroll 

Charles 

Washington , 

Howard , 

Harford 

Queen Anne's 

Talbot 

Cecil 

Somerset 

Dorchester , 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 



160 



5.5 



1.2 
1.7 
1.8 
2.0 
2.3 
2.9 
3.7 
4.3 

D.O 

5.9 
8.7 
11.8 
12.8 
14.2 
14.4 
14.9 
23.9 
25.9 
37.5 



3,831 



39 
128 
149 

23 
151 

25 

84 
111 

56 
407 
122 
401 
116 

99 
327 
172 
361 
160 
900 



3.6 



1.1 
1.4 
1.4 
1.5 
2 
2.9 
2 
3.8 
4.0 
5 
9 
9.2 
7.2 
11.4 
10.6 
16.2 
21.3 
26.4 



Total and Average 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Montgomery 

Howard 

Allegany 

Baltimore 

Prince George's. . . 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundel 

Frederick 

Dorchester 

Cecil 

Charles 

St. Mary's 

Kent 

Talbot 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Harford 

Queen Anne's 



146 



24.0 



4.0 
10.0 

7.0 
13.3 
13.9 
14.8 
16.3 
16.7 
18.2 
18 
21 
25 
30 
34 
37 
43 
45 
48 
50 
52 
71 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i. e.. grades one to five, six, seven or eight. 



One-Teacher Schools; Public High Schools 



S5 



TABLE 70 

Number of Public High Schools, Year Ending July 31, 1942 



Public High Schools for 



Year and 
County 


White Pupils 


Colored Pupils 


Total 


Group 


Total 


Group 




l. or jr. 


1 


2S 


1920 


82 


*69 


tl3 


4 




t4 


1925 


148 


*130 


tl8 


16 


ii 


5 


1930 


152 


142 


alO 


25 


17 


8 


1935 


150 


136 


bl4 


28 


25 


3 


1940 


149 


133 


cl6 


33 


31 


2 


1941 


149 


132 


dl7 


33 


31 


2 


1942 


148 


131 


dl7 


33 


31 


2 




10 


8 


2 


1 


1 






6 


4 


a2 


1 


1 






12 


6 


*6 


3 


3 




Calvert 


1 


1 


1 


1 






5 


5 




1 


1 




Carroll 


9 


8 




1 


1 




Cecil 


8 


8 




1 


1 




Charles 


5 


5 




2 


2 




Dorchester 


6 


6 




1 


1 






7 


7 




1 


1 




Garrett 


6 


6 










Harford 


8 


8 




2 


2 






4 


4 




1 


1 




Kent 


4 


4 




1 


1 






11 


7 




1 


1 






12 


12 




3 


3 




5 


5 




1 


1 




St. Mary's 


2 


2 




2 


2 






4 


4 




2 


2 




Talbot 


4 


4 




2 


2 






8 


6 




1 


1 






6 


6 




1 


1 






5 


5 




3 


1 


'2 




21 


§7 


xl4 


4 


§2 


x2 


Entire State 


169 


138 


31 


37 


33 


4 



First group schools have as a minimum an enrollment of 30, an attendance of 25, and 
two teachers. They give a four-year course. Second group schools have as a minimum an 
enrollment of 15, an attendance of 12. They give a two-year course. Junior high schools 
composed of the higher elementary grades (7 in the 7 grade counties and 7-8 in the 8 grade 
counties) and the first or first and second years of high school (8 or 8-9 in the 11 grade 
counties and 9 in the 12 grade counties J. 

* Includes the group classified as group 1 and group 2, prior to 1928. 

t Classified as group 3 prior to 1928. 

a Second group schools only. 

b Includes 7 junior high schools. 

c Includes 10 junior high schools. 

d Includes 11 junior high schools. 

% Includes 4 second group schools which give a one-year course only, and 2 with a 
two-year course. 

§Includes two junior-senior high schools with grades 7-12 inclusive, 
x Junior high schools having grades 7 to 9 inclusive. 
For individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



86 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 71 



Size of Teaching Staff in Last Four Years of Maryland County White 
High Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Number 
of 

Teachers 


Total No. 
Schools 


Allegany 


Anne Arundel 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomery 


Prince George's | 


Queen Anne's II 


| St. Mary's 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washington 


Wicomico 


Worcester 


Total 


148 


10 


6 


12 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


7 


6 


8 


4 


4 


11 


12 


5 


2 


4 


4 


8 


6 


5 







































First Group High Schools 



2 


8 
6 
V9 
11 
10 
10 
4 
14 
10 
6 
5 

1 
1 

4 

1 

4 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

3 

3 
1 
1 














1 




3 




l 






i 










1 






1 
2 
1 






1 

2 














l 

2 






4 








l 
l 


1 
3 
1 
1 
1 


2 
1 


3 






2 
2 
1 


2 


i 
l 




3 




i 


i 




5 










i 
i 
i 

i 
l 


2 
1 


6 




1 
1 






2 




1 




7 








1 

i 
l 


i 
i 


i 


1 






3 






8 








1 




i 
i 




i 
l 


1 

2 
1 
1 




9 






l 




2 










1 




] 
] 


10. 


1 




i 
l 


l 


11 


1 






i 


1 


12 


















i 










13 




























1 


14 
































1 














15 






































l 








17 






l 








l 






l 










l 
















19 










1 






















23 












1 


















2 
















24 
















i 


























25 


1 












































28 




l 
l 










































29 :. . 










































32 : 
























l 


















33 










































1 




34 
































1 












36 


1 
1 


i 
l 


l 








































37 . 
























l 


















40 




































1 






45 
















l 






















50 






l 

















































































Second Group and Junior High Schools 



1 


4 

5 

2 
1 

3 
1 

1 


1 
1 


i 
i 


3 

l 
l 










































2 






i 


















i 
l 


















4 


































5 








































9 


l 
























l 












i 

































































































































For teaching staff in individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



Size of Teaching Staff and Enrollment in White High Schools 87 

TABLE 72 



Size of Enrollment in Last Four Years of Maryland County White High 
Schools, for Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Average Number 
Belonging 


Total No. 
Schools 


Allegany 


Anne Arundel 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


J 
C 
en 
43 

o 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomery 


Prince George's 


Queen Anne's || 


St. Mary's 


1 

s 

o 

X 


c 

% 

Eh 


Washington 


Wicomico 


Worcester || 


Total 


148 


10 


6 


12 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


7 


6 


8 


4 


4 


11 


12 


5 


2 


4 


4 


8 


6 


5 







































First Group High Schools 



26- 40 


2 
4 
15 
19 
15 
7 
9 
10 
10 
5 
4 
3 
2 
4 

1 

1 

2 
2 
1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 














1 














1 




















41- 50 




















1 

1 
1 
1 
















i 
l 




1 
1 
2 
1 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


51- 75 
















1 

2 


4 


2 
1 


i 

4 
•2. 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


i 
i 


3 


2 
1 

i 


j 


i 
i 


76- 100 


2 
1 








i 
i 


1 
1 
4 
1 


2 
2 


101- 125 


i 






126- 150 






i 

• i 

2 


151- 175 




i 








1 
1 


1 
1 


1 




i 










176- 200 






2 












1 
2 
1 
1 


l 




















2 


i 




1 




i 




i 


i 


226- 250 








i 


1 




251- 275 






i 














1 


i 




. . 


i 


i 








276- 300 






















1 






301- 325 


1 
1 


























i 






326- 350 


















1 










1 








i 








401- 425 












1 




























501- 525 






i 








































551- 575 












1 














1 
1 
















576- 600 




















i 
























601- 625 












1 
































676- 700 




























l 


















701- 725 


1 












































751- 775 




























i 


















826- 850 


1 

i 


i 


l 








































926- 950 




































976-1,000 










































1,001-1,025 












































1,026-1,050 


i 












































1,051-1,075 












































1,151-1,175 








































1 






1,176-1,200 




















1 






















1,201-1,225 






i 
i 








































1,501-1,525 














































































1 





Second Group and Junior High Schools 



26- 40 


5 
2 


1 
1 


1 


3 
























1 


















51- 75 






1 


































76- 100 


















1 


















101- 125 




1 










































126- 150 


1 










































201- 225 
























1 


















226- 250 








































1 
1 






251- 275 










































226- 350 






























1 





















































For enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



88 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 73 

Size of Teaching Staff and Size of Enrollment in County High Schools 
for Colored Pupils. Year Ending June 30, 1942 



No. of 
Teachers 

Average 

No. 
Belonging 



a 












mor 


ert 


line 


"3 




in 
.2 




> 


o 


u 


'5 


"C 

c3 


H 


"3 


u 
at 


L. 

03 


ID 




« 


O 


O 


U 


u 


o 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 



Number of Schools Distributed by Size of Teaching Staff 



2 


*6 
5 
4 
6 
3 
4 
2 

1 

1 
1 


i 




i 

2 
















l 
i 
















l 


l 




*2 


3 
















l 














4 






i 














l 
i 


i 


i 
i 


l 
i 










5 












l 


l 










l 










6 








1 




















1 


7 








l 






l 




l 
















i 






8 
















l 


l 














11 


















l 
























16 








































l 




17 




i 
















































































Number of Schools Distributed by Size of Enrolllment 


26-55 


2 
*6 
4 
7 
2 
5 
3 

1 
1 

1 

1 






































l 


l 




*2 


56-75 


i 




1 
1 
















l 












i 




76-100 


i 




l 










l 






l 












101-125 


l 








l 


l 


i 


i 










126-150 


l 












l 










151-175 .... 










l 














l 








i 


i 






1 


176-200 , , , 














l 


l 


l 








l 






301-325 






































326-350 .... 


























l 


















376-400 .... 








































l 




451-475 




i 















































































Includes two second group schools in Worcester County. 

For individual high schools in 1942, see Table XXIII, pages 210 to 215. 



Size of Colored High Schools; Baltimore City Summer Schools 89 
and Adult Education 



TABLE 74 — Baltimore City Summer Schools, 1941 



1 xrhi (Jb 

School 


No. 
of 
Schools 


To 
Enrol 

Boys 


tal 

Girls 


Net R 
Total 


oil at End of Term 
Taking 


Percent of Net 

Roll Recom- 
mended for Pro- 
motion Taking 


No of 
Princi- 
pals and 
Teachers 


Review 
Work 


Advance 
Work 


Review 
Work 


Advance 
Work 


White Schools: 




















Secondary: 






















2 


995 


843 


1,693 


1,637 
583 


56 


88.2 


93.6 


31 


Junior 


1 


402 


227 


583 




93.6 




11 


Elementary 


4 


673 


495 


872 


872 





95.3 




18 


Demonstration 


1 


153 


206 


337 




337 




100.0 


14 


Total White 


g 


2,223 


1,771 


3,485 


3,092 


393 






74 


Colored Schools: 




















Secondary: 




















Senior 


j i 


53 


120 


164 


152 


12 


91.7 


100.0 


5 


Junior 


f 4 


176 


273 


400 


400 




91.1 




8 


Elementary 




681 


831 


1 343 


1,343 




86.1 




21 




1 


128 


238 


336 


336 




166 '. 6 


12 


Total Colored . . 


6 


1,038 


1,462 


2,243 


1,895 


348 






46 


All Schools:. . 




















1941 


14 


3,261 


3,233 


5,728 


4,987 


741 






120 


1940 


14 


3,641 


3,347 


6,135 


5,370 


765 






127 


1939 


14 


3,644 


3,359 


6,208 


5,505 


703 






121 


1938 


14 


3,299 


3,350 


5,822 


4,917 


905 






128 


1937 


14 


2,905 


2,948 


5,142 


4,290 


852 






121 


1936 


14 


3,400 


3,028 


5,544 


4,963 


581 






122 


1935 


14 


4,150 


3,929 


7,015 


6,304 


711 






128 


1934 


15 


3,728 


3,472 


6,139 


5,324 


815 






120 


1932 


12 


3,644 


3,263 


6,081 


5,393 


688 






107 


1931 


16 


4,399 


4,088 


7,192 


6,354 


838 






154 



TABLE 75— Baltimore City Adult Education 



Enrollment 



Type of Work 


White 


Colored 


Nights 

in 
Session 
1941-42 


1942 


1941 


1932 


1942 


1941 


1932 


Americanization 


1,670 


1,797 


1,215 








92 


Academic: 


















74 


105 


583 


1,386 


1,371 


1,461 


69 




2,036 


2,169 


3,181 


730 


802 


540 


*92 




1,518 


2,020 


2,704 


359 


357 


350 


80 


Vocational: 


















1,370 


1,951 


2,418 


521 


513 


376 


47 




379 


457 


736 


498 


495 


576 


47 




1,906 


2,289 




653 


720 








2,001 


732 












National Defense 


14,251 


7,575 




1^753 


in 






Informal Program 


1,466 


1,153 










69 


Average Net Roll 


10,227 


10,533 


7,310 


3,817 


3,485 


2,815 






7,398 


7,886 


5,920 


2,841 


2,587 


3,359 






72.3 


74.9 


80.8 


74.4 


74.2 


83.4 




Average Number of 


















439 


412 


282 


132 


114 


80 





* Junior high 80 nights. 



90 



1942 Report of 



Maryland State Department of 



Education 



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92 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 77 — Service Rendered Cases Referred for Vocational Rehabilitation 
in Maryland During Year Ending June 30, 1942 











Training 


Being 


Surveyed, 


Closed 




Total 




Being 


Completed, 


Prepared 


under 


after 


County 


Number 


Rehabili- 


Followed 


Awaiting 


for Em- 


Advise- 


Other 


of Cases 


tated 


on Jobs 


Jobs 


ployment 


ment 


Services 


Total Counties. . 


244 


83 


18 


10 


44 


71 


18 




40 


10 


4 


2 


10 


13 


1 


Anne Arundel . . . 


8 


4 






1 


1 


2 




36 


16 


2 




5 


6 


7 


Calvert. 


3 


1 








2 






4 


2 






i 


1 




Carroll <. . . 


8 


3 






1 


2 




Cecil 


2 








1 


1 






11 


5 




i 


4 


1 






b 


i 

l 


' o 
& 




o 

H 


i 

i 






21 


6 


1 


i 


3 


9 






1 a 
lo 


o 
C 


1 


2 


g 


1 




Harford 


11 


6 






2 


3 






3 




"i 


i 




1 




















Montgomery.". . . 


12 


5 




i 


i 


4 


i 


Pr . George's .... 


26 


11 


'4 


l 


2 


6 
1 


2 


Queen Anne's. . . 


1 












St. Mary's 


3 


3 












Somerset 


2 










2 




Talbot 


2 










1 


i 


Washington 


13 


'6 


i 


i 


3 


1 


1 




12 


1 


2 




1 


8 




Worcester 


2 


1 






1 






Balto. City 


294 


126 


17 


15 


58 


58 


20 


Total State 


538 


209 


35 


25 


102 


129 


38 



Vocational Rehabilitation Service was in greater demand 
in 1941-42 than at any other time during its existence. The 
need of war industries for large numbers of workers opened 
up employment opportunities to hundreds of disabled persons 
who previously were denied a chance to work. This increased 
production increased the number of industrial accidents, there- 
by adding to the case load of the rehabilitation service approx- 
imately 50 new cases a month. 

In spite of what the Service is doing, however, it is unable 
to keep up with the demands being made upon it. Hundreds 
of calls from employers for qualified workers have to go unan- 
swered while hundreds of disabled persons who could be trained 
and placed in war production jobs sit at home and wait, — all 
because of inadequate funds and personnel for bringing the 
disabled man and the job together. 

The State Board of Education on October 24, 1941, approved 
the following changes in federal regulations regarding vocational 
rehabilitation : 

The purchase and supply of artificial appliances for a client 
whenever it is shown that it will aid him in securing employment. 

The use of federal funds to pay the cost of maintenance for 
trainees receiving instruction away from their homes. 



Vocational Rehabilitation; Training for War Production 93 



VOCATIONAL DEFENSE TRAINING PROGRAM FINANCED BY 
FEDERAL FUNDS 

Program 1 — Pre-employment and Supplementary Courses 

a. In pre-employment courses specific instruction was given 
persons of legally employable age (18 years or over at the time 
of completion of the course) selected from the Public Employ- 
ment Office Register, and who, upon completion of the training 
course were qualified for employment in occupations essential 
to National Defense. In 1941-42, the enrollment in these 
courses was 7,110 in the counties and 13,613 in Baltimore City, 
an increase for the State of 12,536 over 1940-41. 

This increase is explained chiefly by the inclusion of 7,519 
women who completed the training program. Training given 
women centered around radio work, aircraft woodwork and rivet- 
ing, small parts assembly, acetylene welding, crystal grinding, 
tracer work, operation of precision machine tools, operations con- 
nected with making or correcting blueprints, and other production 
materials. 

(1) The decentralization of defense industries through sub- 
contracts made it possible to provide courses and employment 
possibilities in sections heretofore classified as rural and non- 
defense. A large number of male negroes were trained for the 
shipbuilding industries and female negroes in small parts as- 
sembly and aircraft. 

(2) The program for pre-employment training formerly dealt 
exclusively with an out^of-schooJ group. In view of the acute 
shortage of workers which will become even more critical in 
the future, a Junior Training Program which admitted 576 high 
school students 18 years of age and over into classes of defense 
training was inaugurated. High school schedules in some in- 
stances were revised to permit students to study the required 
academic subjects in the forenoon and to attend defense training 
classes 4 hours each afternoon. In this way students were pre- 
pared for entrance into defense industries. Upon the closing 
of the regular school year these individuals met the requirements 
for graduation and had attained single skills, which made them 
available for production work immediately. 

(3) Mechanic Learner Classes in machine shop occupations 
were organized for men in collaboration with officials at Aberdeen 
Proving Ground and the Civil Service in a section of the Havre 
de Grace High School building. Two hundred sixteen learners 
were selected by the Civil Service and an entrance wage was 
paid during the period of training. Mechanic Learner Classes for 
women were organized in tracing and elementary drafting for 
copy work, change orders, and release. 



94 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Vocational Defense Training Program for War Production 



95 



(4) So far as we know, Maryland was the first and is the only 
State which attempted a cooperative program of training in penal 
institutions, in which an instructor was assigned to give specific 
training for occupational adjustment. A course in machine tool 
operation was offered in the Maryland Penitentiary and one in 
acetylene and electric welding at the Penal Farm at Roxbury. 
The 96 enrollees in these classes were selected on the basis of 
interest, ability and availability to industry pending their release 
from the institution at the end of 4 to 8 weeks of training. The 
plan was controlled by the institution authorities and the Parole 
Board. The U.S. Employment Service and Vocational Guidance 
personnel of the State Department of Education cooperated in 
testing and selecting the various assignees. 

b. In supplementary courses instruction was offered to 27,705 
employed persons engaged in an occupation essential to National 
Defense or in allied occupations, for the purpose of extending 
their skills and knowledge. 

( 1 ) These supplementary courses also took care of the training 
of military personnel at Aberdeen, Edgewood Arsenal, Camp 
Holabird and Camp Rodman, but some of this training was later 
absorbed by the Army. Specialized electrical work was offered 
in a Baltimore City Vocational School to approximately 60 men 
each month who were transported daily from Aberdeen Proving 
Ground. The training was highly specialized and centered its 
instruction around the use of the mobile unit that is used in field 
repair and maintenance. 

(2) Any upgrading program requires a training job through- 
out the plant at every level, as old employees are moved up to 
make way for new ones. The Vocational Defense Training Pro- 
gram cooperated with the Training Within Industry organization 
of the Office of Production Management, which is interested in 
training only as it is incidental to production. 

A large portion of this training had to be done by industry 
on the job, where emphasis was placed on the training of super- 
visors, foremen and lead men, who were key employees in the 
industry. Approximately one out of every 10 employees is a 
supervisor and a large part of his job is to train the employees 
under him. 

Major objectives in the Training Within Industry program 
were: (1) to give the supervisors instruction techniques ; (2) to 
familiarize them with devices with which to break in new employ- 
ees; and (3) the general upgrading of all instructors. The extent 
and intensity of the instruction varied and differed with the level 
of training. Generally, however, training was highly intensive 
with a terminal period at 10 to 20 hours. Twenty-two major in- 



96 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

dustries in the State cooperated in this In-Plant-Training Pro- 
gram and sent 1499 key men to the conferences with the hope that 
they would learn teaching techniques which they, as instructor- 
teacher-trainers, could use within their own organizations. 
Program 4— Courses for Out-of -School Rural Youth 17 Years and Above 
The purposes were as follows: 

a. To train youth 17 years and above who do not have an opportunity 
to get training in pre-employment and supplementary courses. 

b. To create a reservoir of youth with preliminary training who may 
go into national defense employment as the occasion demands. 

c. To qualify trainees to better serve agriculture as it becomes in- 
creasingly mechanized. 

d. To serve as a device for selection and guidance of youth into ad- 
vanced or specific training courses. 

The following types of training are offered: 

a. Operation, care and repair of tractors, trucks and automobiles 
(including both gas and Diesel engines). 

b. Metal work, including welding, tempering, drilling, shaping and 
machinery repairs. 

c. Woodworking on a small building construction and repair basis. 

d. Elementary electricity, including operation, care and repair of 
electrical equipment and wiring for light and power. 

There were 5,109 individuals in the Out of School Youth Pro- 
gram in 1941-42. Emphasis was placed on Farm Machinery Re- 
pair and Reconditioning as a part of the Out of School Youth 
Training Program in the Metal Working Course. Farm machin- 
ery was used as instructional material in offering training to 
the rural people of the State. Many major pieces of farm equip- 
ment were repaired and are now in use on the farms. The repair 
Program was closely integrated with the regular Vocational Edu- 
cation Program in Agriculture. Vocational agriculture teachers 
were instrumental in coordinatng and promoting the program 
in their respective communities. All counties in the State partic- 
ipated with one or more courses, serving a total of more than 
2,100 farm people. This program did much to build up a reservoir 
of semi-skilled mechanics, assisted with the "Food for Freedom 
Program," and alleviated a shortage of farm equipment, so vital 
in meeting the needs of increased production, and made possible 
greater conversion from machinery tool and implement manu- 
facturing to armament, tank and airplane production. 

Contributions by High School Boys in Industrial Arts and Education Classes 

High school pupils cooperated in the building of model air- 
planes to be used for instructional purposes. These models 
were constructed to scale by high school boys and girls in in- 
dustrial arts and industrial education classes. When the model 
is observed from a distance of 12 feet it will appear approxi- 
mately the same size as a plane observed at a distance of one 
mile. In addition to this assignment, the schools cooperated in 
building model incendiary bombs, cots, and stretchers for the 
Red Cross and the Office of Civilian Defense as well as splints, 
crutches and other equipment. 



Vocational Training for Out-of-School Youth; 
Cost of Schools 1922-1942 



97 



TABLE 79 



School Current Expenses from State, Federal, and Local Funds and Capital 
Outlay by Boards of Education in the Counties and Baltimore City, 1922-1942 



Year 


Current Expense Disbursements 


Capital 
Outlay 


Ending 
July 31 


Total 


From State 
Funds 


From Federal 
Funds 


From Local 
Funds 



Total Counties 



1922 


$5,291,124 


$1,527,627 


$f33,853 


$3,729,644 


$1,121,554 


1923 


5,964,456 


2,005,335 


f33,710 


3,925,411 


1,475,269 


1924 


6,475,803 


2,041,155 


t43,244 


4,391,404 


949,720 


1925 


6,743,015 


2,130,518 


f43,252 


4,569,245 


2,527,823 


1926 


7,143,150 


2,212,857 


f48,010 


4,882,283 


2,602,745 


1927 


7,517,720 


2,291,235 


t48,965 


5,177,529 


1,023,362 


1928 


7,787,298 


x°2,207,335 


t51,910 


5,528,053 


1,532,718 


1929 


8,164,657 


x°2,279,589 


f54,425 


5,830,643 


1,773,070 


1930 


8,456,414 


x2, 299, 380 


t69,779 


6,087,255 


2,450,144 


1931 


8,852,073 


2,323,767 


|78,755 


6,449,551 


2,172,088 


1932 


8,892,181 


2,661,382 


t77,470 


6,153,329 


1,650,065 


1933 


8,485,146 


2,531,668 


t78,343 


5,875,135 


688,497 


1934 


8,010,425 


3,622,840 


t67,903 


4,319,682 


1,132,433 


1935 


8,189,909 


3,665,763 


f75,727 


4,448,419 


1,590,879 


1936 


8,715,542 


3,580,265 


T84.854 


5,050,423 


2,000,321 


1937 


9,082,523 


3,583,329 


t92,553 


5,406,641 


2,531,071 


1938 


9,893,912 


4,219,147 


fl44,854 


5,529,911 


1,576,434 


1939 


10,216,150 


4,300,033 


tl66,016 


5,750,101 


2,845,537 


1940 


10,752,978 


4,415,744 


tl66,215 


6,171,019 


2,773,778 


1941 


§11,108,701 


4,406,610 


§tl67,417 


6,534,674 


1,116,817 


1942 


§11,687,272 


4,828,593 


§fl85,069 


6,673,610 


1,483,259 



♦Baltimore City 



1922 


$6,594,168 


$1,015,034 


$11,939 


$5,567,195 


$1,417,569 


1923 


6,799,794 


1,052,845 


13,256 


5,733,693 


3,301,086 


1924 


6,794,048 


1,046,561 


14,551 


5,732,936 


5,336,889 


1925 


7,237,993 


1,024,179 


18,301 


6,195,513 


3,224,734 


1926 


7,480,170 


1,034,372 


22,522 


6,423,276 


3,484,767 


1927 


7,878,719 


1,066,385 


20,112 


6,792,222 


4,200,038 


1928 


8,360,391 


x999,753 


17,240 


7,343,398 


1,897,871 


1929 


8,767,395 


xl, 017, 153 


20,338 


7,729,904 


633,632 


1930. . : 


9,193,068 


x976,083 


18,980 


8,198,005 


1,508,678 


1931 


9,666,385 


932,251 


13,773 


8,720,361 


3,658,046 


1932 


9,415,054 


974,431 


11,131 


8,429,492 


2,678,922 


1933 


8,388,125 


1,072,738 


10,663 


7,304,724 


1,268,159 


1934 


7,992,222 


948,586 


10,081 


7,033,555 


1,087,351 


1935 


8,502,074 


954,383 


25,913 


7,521,778 


642,191 


1936 


8,744,298 


946,396 


26,363 


7,771,539 


223,669 


1937 


9,031,032 


943,073 


22,536 


8,065,423 


1,156,748 


1938 


9,347,234 


941,150 


83,737 


8,322,347 


759,130 


1939 


9,747,952 


950,005 


55,923 


8,742,024 


30,785 


1940 


9,845,208 


953,033 


56,690 


8,835,485 


13,032 


1941 


§10,238,979 


937,901 


§57,256 


9,243,822 


145,492 


1942 


§10,301,657 


930,151 


§55,978 


9,315,528 


238,119 



♦Entire State 



1922 


$11,885,292 


$2,542,661 




$45,792 


$9,296,839 


$2,539,123 


1923 


12,764,250 


3,058,180 




46,966 


9,659,104 


4,776,355 


1924 


13,269,851 


3,087,716 




57,795 


10,124,340 


6,286,609 


1925 


13,981,008 


3,154,697 




61,553 


10,764,758 


5,752,557 


1926 


14,623,320 


3,247,229 




70,532 


11,305,559 


6,087,512 


1927 


15,396,448 


3,357,620 




69,077 


11,969,751 


5,223,400 


1928 


16,147,689 


x3, 207, 088 




69,150 


12,871,451 


3,430,589 


1929 


16,932,052 


x3, 296, 742 




74,763 


13,560,547 


2,406,702 


1930 


17,649,482 


x3, 275, 463 




88,759 


14,285,260 


3,958,822 


1931 


18,518,458 


3,256,018 




92,528 


15,169,912 


5,830,134 


1932 


18,307,235 


3,635,813 




88,601 


14,582,821 


4,328,987 


1933 


16,873,271 


3,604,406 




89,006 


13,179,859 


1,956,656 


1934 


16,002,647 


4,571,426 




77,984 


11,353,237 


2,219,784 


1935 


16,691,983 


4,620,146 




101,640 


11,970,197 


2,233,070 


1936 


17,459.840 


4,526,661 




111,217 


12,821,962 


2,223,990 


1937 


18,113,555 


4,526,402 




115,089 


13,472,064 


3,687,819 


1938 


19,241,146 


5,160,297 




228,591 


13,852,258 


2,335,564 


1939 


19,964,102 


5,250,038 




221,939 


14,492,125 


2,876,322 


1940 


20,598,186 


5,368,777 




222,905 


15,006,504 


2,786,810 


1941 


§21,347,680 


5,344,511 




§224.673 


15,778,496 


1,262,309 


1942 


§21,988,929 


5,758,744 




§241,047 


15,989,138 


1,721,378 



* Includes expenditures from City funds for training of teachers in City training school (s), 
but excludes amounts appropriated by City and State for the Retirement Fund. 

t Includes amounts received from the Federal Government toward salaries and expenses 
at Indian Head. 

x Excludes receipts from liquidation of Free School Fund. 

° Excludes $6,500 to be used by Charles County for school building purposes. 

g Excludes expenditures for Vocational Defense Training Classes, See Table 94, page 78. 



98 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 20 



Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid in 23 Counties and 
Baltimore City*, 1920 to 1942 



MllUOMS 
opDoulars 



Millions 
orDouARS 























✓ 




-- 






A 






\ 
\ 










-- 


h 






,'''<& 


to** 
















i 

i 

■- 'ro 
if 

il 
jj 


7 
















































Tt A»t> - 




)WT1E5 










Cit r 

















1920 1924- 19L6 1928 1930 2932 1934 1930 tt3« mo 

•Includes expenditures from City funds for training teachers in City training school (s), 
hut excludes amounts appropriated by City and State for the Retirement Fund for teachers. 

For 1942 data, see Tables 79 and 80, pages 97 to 99 and Tables XI and XIII, pages 197 
and 199. 



Growth in School Expenditures; 1942 Expenditures by Source 99 



TABLE 80 



Percent of Current Expense Disbursements Received by County Boards of 
Education from State* and Federal* Funds for Year Ending July 31, 1942 



County 


Total 
Disburse- 
ments 
ior 
Current 
Expensest 


Amount Received for Cur- 
rent Expenses from 


Percent of Current Expense 
Disbursements Received from 


State 
Aid*t 


Fed- 
eral 
Aid*f 


L/Ounty 
Levy and 
Other 
County 
Sources 


State Aid 
Excluding 
Equalization 
Fund 


State 
Equalization 
Fund 


Total 
State Aid 


Federal Aid 


County Levy 
and Other 
Sources 


Total 




















Counties. . 


$11,687,272 


$4,828,593 


$185,069 


$6,673,610 


28.6 


12.7 


41.3 


1.6 


57.1 


Charles 


258,157 


170,573 


J29,863 


57,721 


34.0 


32.1 


66.1 


11.6 


22.3 


St. Mary's. . . 


170,007 


122,972 


5,945 


41,090 


40.2 


32.1 


72.3 


3.5 


24.2 


Garrett 


365,358 


259,777 


7,877 


97,704 


24.2 


46.9 


71.1 


2.2 


26.7 


Calvert . . . 


141,417 


98,625 


2,582 


40,210 


35.5 


34.2 


69.7 


1.8 


28.5 


Somerset .... 


241,117 


170,568 


1,276 


69,273 


38.2 


32.6 


70.8 


.5 


28.7 


Caroline 


233 , 590 


141,717 


8,437 


83,436 


31.8 


28.9 


60.7 


3.6 


35.7 


Dorchester . . 


333,389 


190,823 


5,584 


136,982 


31.6 


25.6 


57.2 


1.7 


41.1 


Worcester . . . 


259,483 


142,852 


3,754 


112,877 


20.5 


34.6 


55.1 


1.4 


43.5 




241,046 


131,814 


3,846 


105,386 


29.4 


25.3 


54.7 


1.6 


43.7 


Carroll 


498,115 


268,094 


5,937 


224,084 


28.0 


25.8 


53.8 


1.2 


45.0 


Wicomico. . . 


384,835 


196,790 


2,414 


185,631 


32.4 


18.7 


51.1 


.6 


48.3 


Queen Anne's 


210,215 


102,868 


4,048 


103,299 


31 .7 


17.2 


48.9 


1.9 


49.2 


Anne Arundel 


786,945 


360,663 


6,291 


419,991 


27.8 


18.0 


45.8 


.8 


53.4 


Kent 


178,197 


77,010 


2,062 


99,125 


31 .8 


11.4 


43.2 


1.2 


55.6 


Talbot 


224,771 


95,167 


2,826 


126,778 


32.9 


9.4 


42.3 


1.3 


56.4 


Frederick 


663,958 


274,633 


6,263 


383,062 


28.0 


13.4 


41.4 


.9 


57.7 


Pr. George's . 


1,121,520 


429,792 


10,683 


681,045 


28.9 


9.4 


38.3 


1.0 


60.7 


Allegany .... 


1,072,941 


380,660 


20,488 


671,793 


25.6 


9.9 


35.5 


1.9 


62.6 


Washington . 


822,553 


278,893 


15,840 


527,820 


26.7 


7.2 


33.9 


1.9 


64-2 


Harford 


420,496 


130,175 


11,452 


278,869 


31.0 




31.0 


2.7 


66.3 


Cecil 


342,180 


101,801 


2,796 


237,583 


29.8 




29.8 


.8 


69.4 


Baltimore. . . 


1,482,642 


439,872 


6,386 


1,036,384 


29.7 




29.7 


.4 


69.9 


Montgomery . 


1,234,340 


262.454 


18,419 


953,467 


21.3 




21.3 


1.5 


77-2 


Balto. City . . 


°10,280,315 


°930,151 


55,978 


9,294,186 


9.0 




9.0 


.5 


90.5 


Total State. . 


$21,967,587 


$5,758,744 


$241,047 


$15,967,796 


19.4 


6.8 


26.2 


1.1 


72.7 



* Includes State and Federal Aid for 1941-42 received after July 31, 1942, but excludes 
Federal Aid for Vocational Education National Defense Training classes shown on page 94. 

t Excludes estimated State, Federal and County funds for public school health services 
expended by County and City health offices. 

t Includes $23,695.47 received from Federal government toward salaries and expenses 
at Indian Head. 

Excludes $878,557 for teachers in Baltimore City Retirement System of which $536,890 
came from State funds and $341,667 from local funds, and $21,342 for City Teachers College. 
For detailed data, see Tables XI-XIII, pages 197 to 199. 



100 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 21 



PER CENT OF CURRENT EXPENDITURES FOR YEAR ENDING JULY 31, 1942 



County 



Total 

Charles 
St. Mary's 
Garrett 
Calvert 
Somerset 
Caroline 
Dorchester 
Worcester 
Howard 
Carroll 
Wicomico 
Queen Anne's 
Anne Arundel 
Kent 
Talbot 
Frederick 
Prince George's 
Allegany- 
Washington 
Harford 
Ceoil 
Baltimore 
Montgomery 



Received from 



| State, Excluding Equalization Fund 
] Equalization Fund 



Federal Aid 
X//////A County Levy and Other County Sources 




WZMMMMM. 



WfflMMm 



mZMMMM 



WMMMMZL 



WMnZZZZMZMSMBi 



W////////////////U/////////////A 




WMMMZZMEMMl 



w////////////////////////mm, 



9 W/M////////W////////WM 



i 
I 



I 



16 



WZMMMmfflMMMi, 



'////////////////////ft 



T/mm///////////////, 
9 w////)///////m///w>/mm////m 



WMMMm 



w/m///i/i/////w//m/M////f//m/i/i/i 



Baltimore City 
Total State 



mmv////////////////////////////////////m^^^ 

^ r • ///////////////////^^^ 




For basic data, see Table 80 and Tables XI to XIII, pages 197 to 199. 



TABLE 81— Percent Distribution of School Expenditures By County School 
Boards for Year Ending July 31, 1942 



County 



Percent of Total Current Expense Funds Used for 



£ -2 
.2 § c 

-O 2 



a 
O 



T3 , 

CO « 

«<3-J 
S o c 

u m O 

s-eo 

U | C 



Percent of 
Expenditures 
for Current 
Expenses and 
Capital Out- 
lay Used for 
Capital Outlay 



♦Including Cost of Transportation 



County Average 


2.8 


1.7 


66.1 


4.1 


8.0 


3.5 


12.7 


1.1 


11.3 




2.1 


2.2 


67.9 


5.1 


9.9 


2.3 


9.9 


.6 


1.5 


Anne Arundel 


3.0 


1.3 


64.8 


4.8 


7.0 


4.6 


13.4 


1.1 


3.3 


Baltimore 


2.4 


1.6 


70.4 


3.1 


7.8 


3.0 


10.2 


1.5 


4.2 


Calvert 


5.8 


3.0 


55.5 


2.3 


5.1 


1.0 


26.6 


.7 


5.4 


Caroline 


4.2 


1.5 


60.4 


3.7 


7.5 


2.6 


19.1 


1.0 




Carroll 


2.6 


2.1 


62.8 


4.0 


5.6 


2.6 


19.3 


1.0 


8*.6 


Cecil 


2.6 


1.3 


65.9 


5.6 


9.0 


1.9 


13.0 


.7 


3.0 


Charles 


2.8 


1.7 


56.6 


4.4 


8.2 


5.3 


19.9 


1.1 


4.3 


Dorchester 


3.1 


1.4 


61.2 


3.7 


6.8 


5.4 


17.6 


.8 


.9 




2.6 


1.0 


64.5 


4.4 


8.0 


2.0 


16.6 


.9 


1.9 


Garrett 


3.8 


1.7 


58.4 


3.1 


4.4 


3.5 


22.4 


2.7 


11.2 


Harford 


2.5 


1.6 


72.9 


3.5 


7.6 


3.2 


7.7 


1.0 


1.5 


Howard 


3.4 


1.5 


59.7 


3.8 


7.4 


3.0 


20.0 


1.2 


2.5 


Kent 


4.6 


2.0 


61.0 


2.3 


9.1 


3.0 


17.5 


.5 


.1 




2.1 


2.0 


71.3 


4.8 


10.1 


2.4 


6.7 


.6 


29.1 


Prince George's 


2.4 


1.8 


65.6 


4.9 


8.7 


8.8 


6.7 


1.1 


29.1 




4.0 


1.8 


60.2 


3.5 


8.2 


2.6 


18.0 


1.7 


1.9 


St. Mary's 


5.0 


2.7 


58.0 


2.2 


5.1 


1.0 


25.8 


.2 


.4 




3.7 


1.7 


61.5 


3.0 


6.6 


2.4 


18.2 


2.9 


3.8 


Talbot 


4.1 


1.8 


63.2 


3.3 


8.3 


2.1 


16.3 


.9 


.1 




2.0 


1.9 


73.1 


4.2 


7.0 


2.9 


7.8 


1.1 


11.2 


Wicomico 


3.5 


1.4 


63.8 


3.8 


8.6 


3.4 


14.8 


.7 


23.7 


Worcester 


3.4 


1.9 


61.6 


3.0 


7.8 


2.2 


19.1 


1.0 


6.9 


Baltimore City 


3.4 


1.7 


75.6 


3.3 


10.3 


2.7 


2.7 


t-3 


2.3 


State 


3.1 


1.7 


70.5 


3.7 


9.1 


3.1 


8.1 


.7 


7.4 



♦Excluding Cost of Transportation 



County Average 


3.1 


2.0 


75.2 


4.7 


9.1 


3.9 


.8 


1.2 


12.6 


Allegany 


2.3 


2.4 


74.4 


5.6 


10.9 


2.5 


1.2 


.7 


1.6 


Anne Arundel 


3.5 


1.4 


74.4 


5.4 


8.1 


5.3 


.6 


1.3 


3.8 




2.6 


1.8 


78.0 


3.4 


8.7 


3.3 


.6 


1.6 


4.7 


Calvert 


7.8 


3.3 


75.5 


4.1 


7.0 


1.3 


.1 


.9 


7.2 




5.1 


1.8 


74.0 


4.5 


9.2 


3.2 


1.0 


1.2 


.1 


Carroll 


3.2 


2.5 


76.9 


5.0 


6.8 


3.1 


1.2 


1.3 


10.3 


Cecil 


3.0 


1.5 


75.3 


6.3 


10.3 


2.2 


.7 


.7 


3.4 




3.5 


2.1 


70.3 


5.4 


10.1 


6.6 


.7 


1.3 


5.3 




3.7 


1.7 


73.6 


4.5 


8.2 


6.5 


.9 


.9 


1.1 




3.0 


1.2 


76.9 


5.3 


9.5 


2.4 


.6 


1.1 


2.3 




4.8 


2.1 


73.8 


3.9 


5.5 


4.5 


2.0 


3.4 


13.7 




2.7 


1.8 


78.6 


3.8 


8.1 


3.4 


.5 


1.1 


1.6 




4.1 


1.9 


74.2 


4.8 


9.2 


3.7 


.6 


1.5 


3.0 


Kent 


5.6 


2.4 


73.4 


2.8 


11.0 


3.7 


.6 


.5 


.2 


Montgomery 


2.2 


2.1 


75.7 


5.1 


10.8 


2.5 


.9 


.7 


30.3 


Prince George's 


2.5 


1.9 


69.7 


5.2 


9.2 


9.4 


.9 


1.2 


30.3 




4.8 


2.2 


72.6 


4.2 


9.9 


3.1 


1.1 


2.1 


2.2 




6.7 


3.6 


77.6 


3.0 


6.8 


1.3 


.7 


.3 


.6 


Somerset 


4.5 


2.1 


74.6 


3.6 


8.0 


2.9 


.8 


3.5 


4.6 


Talbot 


4.9 


2.2 


74.9 


3.9 


9.9 


2.5 


.7 


1.0 


.1 


Washington 


2.2 


2.0 


79.1 


4.6 


7.6 


3.1 


.2 


1.2 


12.0 


Wicomico 


4.0 


1.6 


74.5 


4.4 


10.1 


3.9 


.6 


.9 


26.6 




4.2 


2.4 


75.7 


3.7 


9.6 


2.7 


.5 


1.2 


8.3 


Baltimore City 


3.4 


1.7 


75.8 


3.3 


10.4 


2.7 


2.4 


t-3 


2.3 


State 


3.3 


1.8 


75.5 


4.0 


9.7 


3.3 


1.6 


.8 


7.9 



* Auxiliary agencies exclude estimated expenditures by health offices in counties and 
Baltimore City for services rendered to school children. The upper table includes cost of 
transportation in auxiliary agencies and the lower table excludes cost of transportation. 
Expenditures from Federal funds for Vocational Education National Defense training classes 
are excluded. 

t Baltimore City expenditures for the Retirement System are excluded. 



101 



102 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 22 

How the Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses was Used in 1941-42 in the 

Maryland Counties 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




EXCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




* Fixed charges and payments to adjoining counties. 

x Auxiliary agencies exclude estimated expenditures by health offices in counties for serv- 
ices rendered to school children. The upper circle includes cost of transportation in auxiliary 
agencies (12.7c), while the lower circle excludes cost of transportation (.9c). Expenditures 
from Federal funds for Vocational Education National Defense training classes are excluded. 
For basic data, see Tables XIII, XV, and XVI, pages 199, 201 and 202. 



School Tax Dollar; Cost per Pupil for General Control; 103 
Cost per White Elementary and High School Pupil 



TABLE 82 



Cost Per Pupil Belonging for General Control 











Increase 










Increase 










1942 










1942 


County 


1940 


1941 


1942 


Over 


County 


1940 


1941 


1942 


Over 










1941 










1941 


County Average . . 


$1.83 


$1.86 


$1.90 


$.04 


Carroll 


$1.79 


$1.94 


$2.02 


$.08 










Charles 


1.93 


1.91 


1.99 


.08 


St. Mary's 


3.59 


4.10 


4.02 


*.08 


Anne Arundel . . . 


1.75 


1.97 


1.98 


.01 


Calvert 


3.33 


3.66 


3.87 


.21 


Cecil 


2.08 


2.01 


1.98 


*.03 


Kent 


3.19 


3.32 


3.56 


.24 


Frederick 


1.42 


1.59 


1.81 


.22 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


3.17 


3.34 


3.51 


.17 


Montgomery 


1.93 


1.74 


1.66 


*.08 


Talbot 


3.02 


3.24 


3.12 


*.12 


Harford 


1.74 


1.61 


1.63 


.02 




2.56 


2.97 


3.10 


.13 


Allegany 


1.57 


1.47 


1.48 


.01 


Garrett 


2.68 


2.65 


3.03 


.38 


Prince George's. 


1.33 


1.33 


1.47 


.13 




2.05 


2.16 


2.40 


.24 


Baltimore 


1.38 


1.34 


1.41 


.07 


Wicomico 


2.19 


2.39 


2.36 


*.03 


Washington 


1.17 


1.38 


1.30 


*.08 




2.34 


2.57 


2.31 


*.26 




Howard 


2.70 


2.34 


2.28 


*.06 


Baltimore City . . 


2.84 


2.99 


3.14 


.15 


Dorchester 


2.11 


1.98 


2.24 


.26 




















Total State 


2.24 


2.31 


2.38 


.07 



Decrease. 

For basic data see Table XIV, page 200. 



TABLE 83 

Average Current Expense Costf Per County White Elementary and White 
High School Pupil Belonging, 1923-1942 



Year 



1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 



Average Cost per 
County White Pupil 
Belonging in 



Elemen- 
tary 
Schools 



$39.84 
43.06 
43.67 
46.02 
47.26 
47.81 
49.49 
49.78 
50.17 
49.27 



High 
Schools 



$91.12 
96.44 
95.16 
97.20 
98.43 
95.82 
96.00 
97.60 
98.54 
94.78 



Year 



1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 



Average Cost per 
County White Pupil 
Belonging in 



Elemen- 
tary 
Schools 



High 
Schools 



$46.95 


$82.62 


44.36 


76.21 


45.16 


77.58 


♦48.90 


80.48 


*51.24 


82.47 


*54.86 


90.87 


*54.95 


89.96 


*57.70 


91.45 


*58.48 


93.49 


♦61.34 


97.77 



t Excluding general control and fixed charges. 

* Part of this amount is due to inclusion of estimated expenditures on public white 
elementary school children by county health offices from State and county funds. These 
figures were first included in 1936. 

For basic data for 1942, see Tables XVIII and XIX, pages 204 and 205. 



104 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Cost per Pupil by Types of Schools; Analysis of Cost per 
White Elementary School Pupil 



105 



TABLE 85 



Cost Per Pupil in White Elementary Schools^ Grades 1-7 (8), for the Main 
Subdivisions of Expenditures, Exclusive of General Control, for the 
Year Ending July 31, 1942 











Textbooks 










Total 






Super- 






and Other 


Opera- 


Main- 


Auxiliary 


Current 


Capital 


County 


vision 


Salaries 


Costs of 


tion 


tenance 


Agencies* 


Ex- 


Outlay 










Instruction 










penses 


vUUUL> avci age* 


























1941 


$1.35 


$38 


80 


$1 


91 


$4.76 


$2.05 


$9 


.61 


$58 


48 


$3.03 


1942 


1.39 


39 


60 


2 


00 


5.28 


2.10 


10 


.93 


61 


30 


9.42 


Allegany 


1.35 


43 


87 


2 


99 


6.52 


1.25 


9 


.65 


65 


63 


.60 


Anne Arundel 


1.09 


36 


14 


1 


89 


4.54 


2.64 


13 


72 


60 


02 


3.34 


Baltimore 


.90 


35 


71 


1 


01 


4.56 


1.76 


7 


83 


51 


77 


1.97 


Calvert 


3.68 


39 


09 


1 


38 


5.91 


.52 


30 


61 


81 


19 


.67 




1.86 


35 


67 


1 


78 


4.74 


1.38 


16 


87 


62 


30 


.06 


Carroll 


1.36 


39 


17 


1 


83 


3.67 


1.78 


tl5 


25 


63 


06 


.17 




1.18 


39 


55 


2 


63 


4.90 


.88 


12 


14 


61 


28 


1.10 




1.78 


35 


74 


2 


54 


7.02 


4.48 


21 


10 


72 


66 


1.90 




1.30 


41 


87 


1 


75 


5.23 


2.40 


15 


39 


67 


94 






.89 


38 


77 


1 


91 


5.50 


1.51 


14 


54 


63 


12 


".96 


Garrett 


1.76 


39 


93 


1 


75 


3.11 


2.18 


17 


12 


65 


85 


1.80 


Harford 


1.40 


39 


16 


1 


79 


4.17 


1.51 


8 


88 


56 


91 


1.12 


Howard 


1.29 


35 


67 


1 


82 


4.92 


1.87 


16 


47 


62 


04 


.66 




2.83 


44 


91 


1 


30 


7.81 


1.61 


20 


43 


78 


89 


.07 




1.58 


50 


16 


2 


64 


8.28 


1.89 


7 


76 


72 


31 


29.91 


Prince George's 


1.38 


34 


78 


2 


29 


4.90 


5.32 


5 


07 


53 


74 


31.55 


2.22 


43 


14 


2 


07 


5.48 


1.91 


20 


89 


75 


71 


3.01 




3.68 


48 


51 




02 


3.05 


.95 


28 


82 


86 


03 


.02 


Somerset 


1.71 


37 


33 




90 


4.59 


.82 


16 


30 


62 


65 


.54 


Talbot 


2.22 


41 


79 




57 


7.00 


1.01 


17 


77 


71 


36 






1.53 


39 


34 


2 


24 


4.20 


1.60 


6 


43 


55 


34 


10.' 03 


Wicomico 


1.12 


38 


10 


1 


98 


5.83 


1.75 


13 


88 


62 


66 


40.46 




2.39 


40 


09 


1 


04 


5.67 


1.25 


19 


04 


69 


48 


11.72 


Baltimore City Ele- 




























1.80 


57 


85 


1 


90 


8.59 


2.64 


2 


41 


75 


19 


1.22 




$1.51 


$45 


29 


$1 


97 


$6.31 


$2.27 


$8 


28 


$65 


63 


$6.87 



* Includes estimated expenditures by State and County Departments of Health on serv- 
ices to school children, an average of $2.65 for the counties in 1942. 

t Includes 16 cents for payment by Frederick County for transporting 31 pupils to an 
elementary school in Carroll County. 

For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 204. 



106 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 23 



COST PER WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
EOF CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTHOL 



County 

Co. Average 

St. Mary*s 

Calv. 

Kent 

Q. Anne's 
Chas. 

Mont . 

Wore . 

Talb. 

Dor. 

Garr. 

All. * 

Fred. 

Carr. 

Wic. * 

Som. 

Caro. 

How. 

Cecil 

A. A. 

Harf . 

Wash. 

P. Geo.'s 

Balto. * 

Balto. City 

State 



1940 1941 1942 
$ 58 $ 58 




* Excludes pupils attending elementary school of State Teachers College, 
t Excludes cost per white junior high school pupil, $106 in 1942, $98 in 1941, and $96 in 
1940. 

The 1942 cost per pupil in Worcester should be $69 instead of $71 and the rank should 
be eighth instead of seventh. 

1942 figures include estimated expenditure of $2.65 per pupil by State and County 
Departments of Health, an increase of 90 cents over 1941. 

For basic data, see Table XVIII, page 204. 



Cost per White Elementary School Pupil and Per Pupil in 107 
One-Teacher, Two-Teacher and Graded Schools 



TABLE 91 

Cost Per Pupil Belonging in White One-Teacher, Two-Teacher and Graded 
Schools for Year Ending July 31, 1942, Exclusive of Expenditures for 
General Control, Supervision, and Fixed Charges 



County 



One- 
Teacher 
Schools 



No. 



Cost 
Per 
Pupil 



County 



Two- 
Teacher 
Schools 



No. 



Cost 
Per 
Pupil 



County 





Cost 


No. 


Per 




Pupil 


317 


$56.21 


315 


58.84 


1 


102.16 


4 


76.49 


7 


72.79 


6 


71.73 


24 


70.03 


4 


69.88 


8 


66.77 


5 


65.80 


29 


63.50 


21 


61.54 


8 


61.46 


9 


61.46 


7 


60.90 


14 


60.56 


13 


60.04 


8 


59.58 


6 


59.30 


6 


58.83 


21 


58.47 


13 


53.74 


26 


53.41 


34 


51.81 


41 


50.72 



County Average 

1941 

1942 

Talbot 

Montgomery 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Frederick 

Prince George's. 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Charles 

Allegany 

Washington 

Cecil 

Howard 

Kent 

Harford 



184 
160 



$66.77 
69.49 

94.06 
92.31 
84.96 
78.52 
75.39 
72.97 
70.51 
70.20 
. 69.09 
65.72 
65.44 
64.92 
63.79 
63.46 
61.88 
61.66 
61.52 
61.25 
55.06 



County Average 

1941 

1942 

Kent 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Dorchester 

Calvert 

Talbot 

Queen Anne's. . . 

St. Mary's 

Montgomery 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Frederick 

Harford 

Charles 

Cecil 

Prince George's . 

Garrett 

Allegany 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Howard 



114 
110 



$63.16 
68.53 

90.49 
89.53 
85.32 
84.39 
83.46 
83.33 
82.79 
80.20 
78.47 
76.02 
75.32 
74.75 
70.75 
68.39 
66.58 
64.46 
62.75 
61.45 
59.29 
57.45 
56.54 
54.12 
53.56 



County Average 

1941 

1942 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Queen Anne's. . . 

Charles 

Montgomery 

Kent 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Allegany 

Frederick 

Dorchester 

Garrett 

Howard 

Carroll 

Wicomico 

Cecil 

Somerset 

Caroline 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Harford 

Washington 

Prince George's . 
Baltimore 



Includes estimated expenditures by State and County health offices on services to school 
children. 



108 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 88 



Cost, Excluding General Control, Per Pupil Belonging, in Last Four Years 
of White High Schools, for Year Ending July 31, 1942 





Salaries 


Other 
Instruction 


Operation 


Main 
tenance 


... 

/Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Outlay 


County Average: 




















1941 


$67. 57 


$5.48 


$6. 


92 


$3 66 


$9 86 


$93. 


49 


$17.96 


1942 


7(L63 


5!64 


7. 


58 


3.58 


10!43 


97. 


86 


9.' 64 




60.52 


5.20 


8 


28 


2 . 56 


7.05 


83. 


61 


2.38 


Anne Arundel . . . 


63.77 


6.81 


6 


41 


3.86 


11.99 


92. 


85 


.72 




63.13 


4.41 


4 


83 


1.92 


6.37 


80. 


66 


1.05 


Calvert 


77.63 


4.09 


5 


06 


1.54 


40.94 


129 


26 


31.19 




77.01 


5.32 


8 


60 


4.46 


15.09 


110 


48 


.05 


Carroll 


76.03 


6.44 


6 


12 


2.70 


♦16.95 


108. 


24 


25.27 


Cecil 


75.28 


7.65 


11 


23 


3.00 


9.84 


107 


00 


5.92 




T80.45 


5.63 


T12 


94 


t8.76 


23.15 


130 


93 


6.98 


Dorchester 


73.84 


6.19 


9 


03 


9.66 


16.78 


115 


50 


3.30 




68.30 


6.83 


6 


67 


1.44 


U2.37 


95 


61 


2.53 




63.31 


4.29 


4 


42 


4.90 


26.76 


103 


68 


32.54 




74.33 


4.15 


7 


91 


3.96 


1.12 


91 


47 


1.17 




68.60 


5.68 


8 


66 


3.67 


18.25 


104 


86 


5.45 


Kent 


76.04 


3.00 


10 


12 


4.85 


15.91 


109 


92 


.03 


Montgomery 


93.78 


8.74 


10 


05 


2.46 


1.00 


116 


03 


50.32 


Prince George's . 


63.32 


6.08 


7 


76 


6.81 


6.70 


90 


67 


16.81 


Queen Anne's. . . 


91.15 


6.09 


14 


67 


2.96 


18.04 


132 


93 


.40 


St. Mary's 


67.83 


3.64 


11 


41 


.94 


39.28 


123 


10 


1.41 




76.96 


3.24 


9 


78 


5.52 


17.32 


112 


82 


12.22 


Talbot 


77.70 


5.21 


■8 


.71 


3.11 


15.83 


110 


56 


.25 


Washington 


76.85 


4.72 


5 


.71 


3.61 


6.67 


97 


56 


1.04 




69.25 


4.40 


8 


.79 


4.26 


12.32 


99 


02 


1.10 


Worcester 


75.3^ 


5.42 


8 


.98 


3.37 


17.48 


110 


56 




Baltimore City . . 
Vocational. . . . 


99.62 


5.33 


12 


.87 


2.79 


1.94 


122 


55 


1.20 


130.41 


14.04 


21 


.08 


6.00 


3.05 


174 


.58 


14.67 


Junior High . . 


86.26 


4.35 


11 


.25 


2.41 


1.42 


105 


69 


.42 


Senior High . . . 


113.23 


5.35 


13 


.85 


2.84 


2.49 


137 


.76 


.22 


Total State§ 


$80.88 


$5.57 


$9 


.09 


$3.40 


$8.52 


$107 


46 


$7.37 



t Includes expenditures of Federal Government at Indian Head. 

* Includes 5 cents for payment by Frederick County for transporting 5 pupils to a high 
school in Carroll County. 

% Includes 42 cents for payment by Washington County for transporting 33 pupils to 
a high school in Frederick County. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 205. 

§ Total State includes only senior high schools in Baltimore City. 



Analysis of Cost per White High School Pupil 



109 



CHART 24 



COST PEE WHITE HIGH SCHOOL PDPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



County 1940 1941 1942 

Co. Average $ 91 § 93 E 




State 



t Cost per pupil belonging in senior high schools in Baltimore City excludes $98 per junior 
high, and $147 per vocational school pupil in 1941, and $106 per junior high and $175 per 
vocational school pupil in 1942. 

In 1940 cost per junior high school pupil was $96 and per vocational pupil was $140. 

Worcester for 1942 should read $111 instead of $107, and it should rank tenth instead 
of thirteenth. 

For basic data, see Table XIX, page 205. 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



1 



1 p|S§|SSS^|SS|23SSSSSS 



1 



1 



T = ppffiiipiiiipiiiiif 



3 lissiSiigMissigasiiisi 

O r}<IM<£> HH HNHH COCO (NiH 



I psiiiispiiisipiiisii 



Mpipillplilllip" 



TIlplililipliMsip 



lliTMlilPiisraiil' 



i liiiii 



ii 

il 



11; 



Growth in White High School Pupils, Teachers, and Salaries; 111 
Cost per Colored Elementary School Pupil 



CHART 25 



COST PEE COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



1940 1941 1942 
| 38 $ 40 



County- 
Co. Average 

All. 

Q. Anne's 
Mont. 
Cecil 
Wash. 
Carr. 
Kent 
Caro. 

St. Mary's 
A. A. * 
Fred. 
Talb. 
Dor. 
Wic. 

P. Geo.'s* 
Harf. 
Balto. 
Chas. 
Wore . 
How. 
Sara. 
Calv. 

Balto. City 62 t60 
State 50 51 




* Excludes pupils attending elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College, 
f Excludes $88 per junior high school pupil in 1942, $80 in 1941 and $81 in 1940. 
County average for 1942 includes $2.65, estimated health expenditures per pupil by 
State and county health offices, an increase of 90 cents over the corresponding amount in- 
cluded in 1942. 

For basic data, see Table XXI, page 208. 



112 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 26 



COST PER COLORED HIGH SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



21 

92 



8a 

81 





t Tuition payment of $150 for 57 Baltimore County pupils attending school in Baltimore 
City senior high schools, included with Baltimore County cost per pupil, but excluded from 
county average. Baltimore City and State figures include Baltimore City expenditures for 
these pupils. 

tt Cost per senior high school pupil $137, excludes $88 per junior high and $137 per 
vocational school pupil in 1942. 

% Cost per senior high school pupil in Baltimore City, $118, excludes $80 per junior high 
and $187 per vocational school pupil in 1941, and in 1940, $108 excludes $81 per junior high 
and $144 per vocational school pupil. 

For basic data, see Table XXII, page 209. 



Cost per Colored High School Pupil; Growth in Colored High 113 
School Pupils, Teachers and Salaries 



i 



i 



>M-H 

H 

S 5 



s 



P 

1 

si 

7i 



! 



5 



i 



liiMIMIMMIlIMi 



1 11 :iSIEig§i illlllliiSI 



C- t-* ^ U3 ec CO M CJCflOH TfiijgcK 



i n mnn \ mi mm 

e Tft>* oj^-hojojoo ncox noieita'ei 



I si : :iK32! : :3 :ll 1! H 



- p — 



Til 



I 



2 



'22' 



5 OCM CO^OSTfXO -t-O^tt -CO' 



.91 •C^rroorf^r • -^©«M -OOOXu- 



eo •^■kO oa h -f eo cm ih {vj! 



« ;:::: ^ ,~ 



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| 55 : :822S2? i 1 :§3 :§S :§S 

::: :8 :::::::::: :5 : 



iiiiilii 



Si 



114 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 90 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted to and Expended in Maryland, 1941-1942 



Purpose 


1942 
Allotment 


1942 
Expenditures 


Unexpended 
Balance 


Agriculture 


$68,227.85 
102,598.66 
46,904.63 
26,604.21 
15,350.53 


$66,770.58 
91,699.46 
46,904.63 
22,658.12 
*8,291.89 


$1,457.27 
10,899.20 


Trade and Industry 


Teacher Training and Supervision 

Education for Distributive Occupations 


3,946.09 
7,058.64 


$259,685.88 


$236,324.68 


$23,361.20 



* Includes $1,225.90 for supervision of occupational information and guidance. 



TABLE 91 



Federal Vocational Funds Expended by Subject and Type of School, 1941-42 



Type of School 


Subject 


Total 


Agriculture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Distributive 
Education 


County Day 

White 

Colored 


*$49,292.67 
♦14,218.41 

931.50 
528.00 

1,800.00 


t$31,334.10 
t5,266.71 

°5,265.40 
1,046.00 

3,992.42 


$$31,891.50 
5,206.00 

§8,871.35 


$3,450.00 


$115,968.27 
24,691.12 

15,584.25 
1,574.00 

36,633.61 
17,989.42 


County Evening 

White 

Colored 


516.00 


Baltimore City 

Day 


31,733.61 
13,997.00 


3,100.00 


Total 






$66,770.58 


$46,904.63 


$91,699.46 


$7,066.00 


$212,440.67 



* Includes travel expense totalling $6,645.32 for white and $1,845.11 for colored teachers. 

f Includes $1,355.00 for salary of coordinators, $2,073.86 for salary of teachers doing 
summer home visiting and $344.17 for travel expense of white teachers, and $115.00 for salary 
and $10.00 for travel of colored teacher doing summer home visiting. 

$ Includes $7,122 for salary and $300.25 for travel of coordinators. 

° Includes $98.90 for travel. 

§ Includes $2,214.35 paid University of Maryland for classes for 142 coal miners in 
Allegany and Garrett Counties, and $2,100.00 paid the University of Maryland for training 
of 647 volunteer firemen in fire fighting, first aid, maintenance of equipment, fire fighting 

techniques. 



* 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland; 115 
Federal Aid for Vocational Education for White Pupils in Day Schools 



TABLE 92 

Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Maryland County Day High Schools for 
White Pupils for Year Ending July 31, 1942 



COUNTY 


Agriculture 


Vocational 
Home Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Distributive 
Education 


Total 
Federal 
Aid 
for Salaries 


Enroll- 
ment 


Federal 
Aid 


Enroll- 
ment 


Federal 
Aid 


Enroll- 
ment 


Federal 
Aid 


Enroll- 
ment 


Federal 
Aid 


_ . _ 

local Counties.. . 




















1 QOQ QQ 


2,049 


$46,833.00 


2,613 


$40,143.00 


842 


$25,489.00 






«119 A.R^ no 


1 QQ Q A fl 


2,355 


47,667.00 


2,920 


32,934.00 


892 


25,452.00 






i or n^Q nn 

1UO , UOO . uu 




2,355 


42,928.77 


3,287 


31,840.73 


992 


27,628.08 






1 AO CQJ CO 


IQil AO 


2,291 


42,647.35 


3,603 


30,989.93 


1,151 


24,469.25 


50 


$3,450 


*±U1 , ODD . Do 


All 


74 


♦1,950.80 


304 


♦2,974.07 


335 


5,508.00 






*1 ft A'iO 87 


Anne Arundel . . * . 


37 


624.00 


184 


998.00 










1 fi°9 ftft 




92 


1,658.30 






152 


3,750.66 






e Ana Qft 




40 


810.00 


86 


♦437! 50 










*1,247.50 




215 


3,742.92 


154 


*1,132.00 










*4,874.92 




153 


2,881.00 


129 


993.13 










3,874.13 


Cecil 






90 


*2, 594.00 










♦2,594.00 




80 


l,86o!66 


134 


1,082.50 










2,942.50 


Dorchester 


97 


1,744.00 












900 


2,644.00 


Frederick 


226 


3,625.00 














3,625.00 




241 


3,545.00 


487 


1,987!50 


30 


675! 66 






6,207.50 




200 


4,002.00 


290 


5,812.00 










9,814.00 


Howard 


90 


1,625.83 


153 


1,075.00 










2,700.83 


Montgomery 


136 


2,687.50 


221 


*4,312.15 


106 


2,823!75 




2,550 


♦12,373.40 


Prince George's . . 


27 


675.00 


487 


♦2,560.09 


197 


4,237.50 






♦7,472.59 


Queen Anne's .... 


84 


2,060.00 


142 


815.00 










2,875.00 


Saint Mary's 


110 


1,960.00 


169 


*812.50 










♦2,772.50 


Somerset 


73 


930.00 














930.00 


Talbot 


23 


486.00 


6i 


♦5is!66 










♦1,001.00 


Washington 


166 


3,470.00 


471 


*2,631.16 


33i 


7,475!66 






♦13,576.16 




34 


810.00 














810.00 


Worcester 


93 


1,500.00 


41 


258! 33 










1,758.33 



* Figures above include the items below which are starred. 



County 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Industrial Education 


Travel 


Summer 
Work 
Project 


Co- 
ordinator 


Salary 
Summer 

Home 
Visiting 


Travel 


Co- 
ordinator 


Travel 


Total Counties. . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore 


$6,645.32 

$36.42 
268.20 
116.13 
75.92 
862.58 
271.32 


♦$134.00 
♦$134.00 


♦$1,355.00 
♦$620.00 


♦$2,073.86 
♦$388.80 


$344.17 
$32.43 


$7,122 
$1,632 


$300.25 
$76.01 










600 


79.44 


Calvert 






♦125.00 
♦145.00 


26.67 
20.00 
23.43 
21.87 


Caroline 










Carroll 






90 




Cecil 






♦300.00 




Charles 


644.60 
658.43 
573.24 
503.23 
276.36 

69.07 
468.80 

53.51 
349.93 
143.47 
173.67 

70.90 
365.76 
149.56 
514.22 










Dorchester 














Frederick 














Garrett 














Harford 














Howard 














Montgomery 

Pr. George's .... 
Queen Anne's. . . 




♦535.00 
♦200.00 


♦352.56 
♦150.00 


102.15 
16.00 


2,150 
1,250 


144.80 










♦187.50 


51.90 






Somerset 










Talbot 






♦125.00 
♦300.00 


20.67 
29.05 






Washington 






1,400 




Wicomico 





































116 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 93 

Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Maryland County Day High 
Schools for Colored Pupils for Year Ending July 31, 1942 



County 


Agriculture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


T t 1 

j. otai 
r ederal 

Aid 
for 
Salaries 


Enroll- 
ment 


Federal 
Aid 


Enroll- 
ment 


Federal 
Aid 


Enroll- 
ment 


Federal 
Aid 


Total Counties.. 
















1938-39 


789 


$7,244.00 


1,038 


$6,844.00 


165 


$4,074.00 


$18,162.00 


1939-40 


925 


9,792.00 


1,116 


6,879.00 


194 


3,025.00 


19,696.00 


1940-41 


935 


9,077.64 


1,156 


5,891.00 


194 


5,150.00 


20,118.64 


1941-42 


870 


12,373.30 


1,091 


5,256.71 


160 


5,206.00 


22,836.01 








38 


356.25 


28 


1,550.00 


1,906.25 


Anne Arundel . . . 


i3 


840 1 66 


72 


575.63 


76 


2,576.00 


3,991.63 




41 


906.67 


79 


272.50 




1,179.17 




74 


660.00 


95 


218.40 






878.40 


Carroll 


42 


592.00 










592.00 




135 


1,293.33 


23 i 


530 '. 66 






1,823.33 


Dorchester 


86 


645.00 


52 


130.00 


29 


520 166 


1,295.00 




16 


688.89 


48 


171.25 


27 


560.00 


1,420.14 


Harford 






66 


1,120.00 






1,120.00 


Howard 


46 


688! 89 


38 


163.75 






852.64 


Kent 


72 


945.19 


90 


277.78 






1,222.97 


Montgomery .... 


70 


735.00 










735.00 


Pr. George's .... 


75 


500.00 










500.00 


Queen Anne's. . . 






73 


28i!75 






281.75 




83 


1, 733133 


122 


545.00 






2,278.33 


Talbot 


22 


645.00 


38 


♦354.40 






#999.40 




46 


860.00 










860.00 


Worcester 


49 


640.00 


49 


260 ! 66 






900.00 



* Figure starred below is included above. 



COUNTY 


Agricul- 
ture 
Travel 


COUNTY 


Agricul- 
ture 
Travel 


COUNTY 


Home E 

Summer 
Home 
Visiting 


conomics 
Travel 


Total Counties . . 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Calvert 

Carroll 

Frederick 


$1,845.11 

39.40 
53.04 
245.20 
11.57 
540.77 
205.97 
8.30 


Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Pr. George's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 


$10.14 
98.64 
31.40 
11.97 
241.40 
120.00 
125.07 
102.24 


Talbot 


*$115 


$10.00 



Federal Aid for Colored Day High School Pupils and Source 117 
of Funds for Adult Education in Counties 



3 

.2-8 8 



a> a 



ll 



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ll 



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CO lH** 

oooi 

«3 CO C"» 



IN 



a> ho • t- a> co 

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CO • CO 

i-i »-i • ai cj co 'toootoioiociootc 
oo eo' • 10 rH co <o -todooait^oooooi 

CO iH ■C0"5C0*O 'if OOW^f t>00(0 



lOHHOOtOO- 

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1010U3100001 



t- 1- as to o oo io io 

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O OOCftlHrH CO 



00 t- cot- 

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as lONH^M^iooooHTfnoooiioooo 
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ooooeoooo 



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iO CO CO CO i— I CO COi-H 



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C- CO CO CO i-l CO 



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ail 



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118 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 95 



Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Baltimore City Schools for School 
Year Ending July 31, 1942 



Type of School 




Total 
Federal 
Funds 


Enrol 
Male 


Iment 
Female 


Amount of 
Federal 
Aid per 

Pupil 
Enrolled 


Distributive Education 

Total 


$31,733.61 
1,800.00 
13,997.00 
3,100.00 
3,992.42 


1,453 
13 
944 


405 

120 
159 
899 


$17.07 
138.50 
13.15 
19.50 
4.44 


$54,623.03 


2,41( 


) 


1,583 


$13.70 



TABLE 96 

Expenditures for Administration, Supervision and Teacher Training 
in Vocational Education, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



Purpose 




Administration 
and Supervision 


Teacher 
Training 




Total 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


University 
of 

Maryland 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


State and 
University 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Agriculture 

Trades and Industry . . 

Home Economics 

Occupational Infor- 
mation and Guidance 

Total 


$1,366.42 
3,541.87 
3,281.33 

a3,113.96 


$1,366.37 
2,986.83 
3,226.37 

a2,889.04 


$3,050.87 
7,338.17 
3,026.37 


$3,050.87 
7,338.16 
3,026.37 


$4,417.29 
10,880.04 
6,307.70 

3,113.96 


$4,417.24 
10,324.99 
6,252.74 

2,889.04 


$11,303.58 


$10,468.61 


$13,415.41 


$13,415.40 


$24,718.99 


$23,884.01 



a Includes $528.99 from agriculture, $630.10 from trades and industries, $504.06 
from home economics and $1,225-89 from distributive education. 



Federal Vocational Aid for Baltimore City, Administration and 119 
Supervision; Growth in Transportation of Pupils 



TABLE 97 

Maryland County Expenditures for Transporting Pupils to School 1910-1942 











v^osc to 




Public 


IMuroDer oi 


XT V. t 

jn umoer ot 


Public per 


I bAK 


Expenditures for 


Counties 




Pupil 




Transportation 




Transported 


Transported 


1910 


$5,210 


4 






1915 


17,270 


10 






1920 


64,734 


18 








84,870 


18 






1922 


90,011 


18 






1923 


132,591 


20 


4,344 


$30 . 59 


1924 


188,516 


21 


6,499 


29.01 


1925 


242,041 


22 


8,618 


28.09 




312,495 


22 


10 ,.567 


29.57 


1927 


373,168 


23 


tl3,385 


§27.92 


1928 


436 , 583 


23 


tl5,907 


§27.49 


1929 


♦512,385 


23 


tl8,928 


§27.12 


1930 


*603 , 148 


23 


t22,814 


§26.51 




♦744,400 


23 


t29,006 


§25.71 


1932 


♦834,679 


23 


t35,019 


§23.88 


1933 


858,274 


23 


t40,308 


§21.33 


1934 :.: 


863,549 


23 


t42,241 


§20.47 


1935 


892,422 


23 


t44,576 


§20.04 


1936 


952,598 


23 


t49,051 


§19.48 


1937 


1,019,872 


23 


t52,248 


§19.55 


1938 


1,121,498 


23 


156,268 


§19.96 


1939 : 


1,202,784 


23 


t61,753 


§19.50 


1940 


1,285,520 


23 


t66,036 


§19.50 


1941 


1,326,389 


23 


t70,162 


§18.94 


1942 


1,411,110 


23 


t74,113 


§19.07 



TABLE 98 

County Pupils Transported to Public Schools at Public Expense, 1923-1942 



Year 


Pupils Transported to School at Public Expense 


Public 
Expenditures for 
Transportation of 


Number Transported 


Percent Transported 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


White 
Pupils 


Colored 
Pupils 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


1923 


3,485 


133 


843 





3 


1 


6 





$129,738 


$2,853 


1924 


4,682 


133 


1,701 





5 


1 


11 





185,263 


3,253 


1925 


6,269 


144 


2,197 


1 


6 


1 


13 





238,094 


3,947 


1926 


7,613 


105 


2,835 


14 


8 





15 


2 


308,596 


3,899 


1927 


9,778 


tl40 


3,424 


15 


10 


1 


17 


1 


368,089 


5,079 


1928 


11,774 


t201 


3,870 


20 


11 


1 


18 




431,065 


5,517 


1929 


14,028 


t247 


4,632 


♦23 


14 


1 


20 


I 


506,478 


♦5,907 


1930 


16,670 


t310 


5,660 


♦174 


16 


1 


23 


9 


594,473 


♦8,675 


1931 


20,593 


t493 


7,746 


♦215 


20 


2 


29 


10 


726,747 


♦17,653 


1932 


24,787 


t724 


9,019 


♦477 


23 


3 


32 


19 


807,373 


♦27,305 


1933 


28,741 


t847 


10,157 


502 


27 


3 


34 


19 


828,067 


30,207 


1934 


29,969 


tl,051 


10,581 


740 


28 


4 


35 


27 


826,817 


36,732 


1935 , 


31,147 


tl,096 


11,517 


1,035 


29 


4 


37 


35 


850,481 


41,938 


1936 


32,676 


tl,389 


13,191 


°1,795 


31 


6 


41 


51 


890,325 


°62,272 


1937 


34,076 


U,807 


13,970 


°2,395 


32 


8 


42 


59 


944,922 


°74,951 


1938 


35,980 


f2,749 


14,556 


°2,983 


34 


12 


43 


68 


1,013,356 


°108,142 


1939 


38,201 


t4,147 


16,147 


°3,258 


36 


18 


45 


70 


1,066,880 


°135,904 


1940 


40,633 


t4,834 


17,122 


°3,447 


38 


21 


45 


71 


1,134,161 


°151,359 


1941 


42,765 


t5,472 


18,326 


°3 , 599 


40 


24 


47 


70 


1,160,242 


°166,146 


1942 


45,055 


t6,650 


18,893 


°3,515 


42 


29 


48 


69 


1,223,726 


°187,384 


Increase 






















1923-42. 


41,570 


6,517 


18,050 


3,515 


39 


28 


42 


69 


$1,093,988 


$184,531 



f Includes county pupils transported to elementary school at Bowie Normal School or 
State Teachers College at expense of State. 

* Includes Rosenwald aid toward transportation of pupils. 

° Includes Baltimore County pupils toward whose transportation costs to Baltimore City 
high schools Baltimore County contributed. In 1942 there were 59 pupils and the cost to the 
county was $793.00. 

§ Pupils transported at State expense to Bowie Normal School or Teachers College ex- 
cluded in obtaining cost per pupil transported. 



120 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 99 



Maryland County Pupils Transported to School in 1942 at Public Expense 



County 


Pupils Transported 


Public Expense for Transportation 


Total 


To Ele- 
mentary 
School 


To 
High 
School 


Total 


To Ele- 
mentary 
School 


To 
High 
School 


Total Counties 


t°74,113 


t51,705 


°22,408 


°§$1,411,110 


§$968,941 


°§$442,169 


Baltimore 


°10,585 


7,354 


°3,231 


°§143,830 


106,900 


°§36,930 


Frederick 


*4,750 


3,406 


*1,344 


107,127 


76,873 


30,254 




t5,881 


t3 , 760 


2,121 


101,001 


64,505 


36,496 




5,196 


3,817 


1,379 


94,957 


67,159 


27,798 


Carroll 


J4.404 


£3,126 


tl,278 


91,949 


60,451 


31,498 


Garrett 


2,367 


1,440 


927 


76,229 


45,399 


30,830 


Montgomery 


6,599 


5,265 


1,334 


§72,001 


66,753 


§5,248 


Prince George's 


t4,728 


t3,057 


1,671 


66,198 


35,266 


30,932 




3,463 


2,601 


862 


61,135 


45,155 


15,980 


Dorchester .. 


2,075 


1,377 


698 


56,154 


36,949 


19,205 




2,323 


1,499 


824 


55,077 


34,967 


20,110 


Charles 


2,190 


1,404 


786 


50,134 


31,632 


18,502 




2,259 


1,571 


688 


48,315 


32,651 


15,664 


Howard 


2,458 


1,728 


730 


46,992 


32,743 


14,249 


St. Mary's 


1,558 


942 


616 


42,943 


24,270 


18,673 




2,110 


1,458 


652 


42,780 


29,549 


13,231 


Cecil 


2,238 


1,456 


782 


42,485 


28,493 


13,992 


Somerset 


2,007 


1,399 


608 


42,328 


28,353 


13,975 




1,186 


840 


346 


37,563 


22 , 543 


15,020 




1,371 


900 


471 


36,099 


24,929 


11,170 




1,531 


1,019 


512 


35,286 


23,315 


11,971 




1,556 


1,452 


104 


§30,321 


§30,197 


§124 


Kent 


1,278 


834 


444 


30,206 


19,889 


10,317 



t Includes 124 pupils, 27 from Anne Arundel and 97 from Prince George's transported 
to the elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College. 

° Includes 59 pupils toward whose transportation costs to Baltimore City high schools, 
Baltimore County contributed $793.00. 

* Includes 33 Washington County pupils attending a Frederick County high school. 

t Includes 31 elementary and 5 high school Frederick County pupils attending Carroll 
County Schools. 

§ Supplemented by payments of high school pupils in Baltimore, Montgomery and Harford 
Counties and elementary pupils in Harford County. 



Number of and Expenditures for Pupils Transported; 121 
Cost per Pupil Transported 



TABLE 100 

Cost Per Maryland County Pupil Transported to School at Public Expense 
for Year Ending July 31, 1942 



Average Cost to Public Per County Pupil Transported to 



County 






White 


Colored 






All 














County 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 






Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


County Average. . 




$19.07 


$18.95 


$19.58 


$17.63 


$20.57 


Garrett 




32.21 


31.53 


33.26 






Calvert 




31.67 


32.41 


40.60 


12^23 


48! 92 


St. Mary's 




27.56 


32.82 


37.76 


15.74 


14.48 


Dorchester 




27.06 


30.24 


29.46 


20.87 


22.12 


Queen Anne's 




26.33 


27.24 


22.98 


30.32 


26.21 


Wicomico 




23.71 


25.25 


25.84 


17.77 


21.55 


Kent 




23.64 


24.94 


24.28 


21.38 


20.53 


Talbot 




23.05 


28.48 


26.73 


13.47 


14.49 


Charles 




22.89 


26.57 


28.76 


15.22 


16.54 


Frederick 




t22.55 


22.68 


t22.00 


21.19 


28.41 


Worcester 




21.39 


24.55 


27.48 


14.72 


12.10 






21.09 


24.16 


27.36 


13.61 


15.44 


Carroll 




J20.88 


J19.13 


J24.34 


23.93 


29.73 


Caroline 




20.28 


20.27 


20.27 


20.26 


20.38 






*19.49 


*21.48 


♦1.19 


12.20 




Howard 




19.12 


19.42 


19.02 


15.80 


24! 36 


Cecil 




18.98 


19.03 


16.81 


24.66 


25.94 


Allegany 




18.28 


17.48 


19.79 


88.83 


62.33 


Washington 




17.65 


16.88 


18.24 


82.04 


82.83 


Anne Arundel .... 




17.25 


17.15 


15.45 


27.73 


29.59 


Prince George's . . 




°14.27 


11.78 


17.18 


°16.27 


23.11 


Baltimore 




§*13.59 


14.38 


♦11.55 


16.77 


§*8.78 


Montgomery 




♦10.91 


11.89 


♦1.38 


17.33 


♦12.00 



f Includes average cost of $29.55 for 33 Washington County pupils attending a 
Frederick County high school at a cost of $975 to Washington County. 

% Includes average cost of $22.22 for 31 elementary and 5 high school Frederick County 
pupils attending school in Carroll County at a cost of $800 to Frederick County. 

* Supplemented by payment of high school pupils in Baltimore, Montgomery and Harford 
Counties and elementary pupils in Harford County. 

Cost to Prince George's County for transporting 97 pupils to Bowie State Teachers 
College Demonstration School is excluded in computing average cost per pupil transported. 

§ Includes average cost of $13.44 per Baltimore County pupil transported to high schools 
in Baltimore City. 



122 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 101 

Number and Percent of Maryland County Pupils Transported to School at 
Public Expense, Year Ending July 31, 1942 



White 



County 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total and Average 


















1940 


40,633 


38.4 


17,122 


45.2 


4,834 


20.9 


3,447 


70.5 


1941 


42,765 


40.4 


18,326 


46.7 


5,472 


23.6 


3,599 


70.0 


1942 


45,055 


42.1 


18,893 


48.1 


*6,650 


29.0 


t3,515 


69.4 


St. Mary's 


553 


72.6 


419 


99.1 


389 


49.9 


197 


96.1 




1,504 


68.9 


662 


89.5 


224 


37.4 


68 


81.0 


Carroll 


2,993 


68.9 


1,206 


65.4 


133 


48.5 


72 


71.3 


Caroline. 


1,065 


64.8 


511 


61.6 


393 


67.2 


141 


83.4 


Queen Anne's 


766 


61.7 


364 


73.2 


134 


25.8 


107 


95.5 


Worcester. 


969 


59.0 


477 


58.2 


602 


52.7 


211 


67.4 




904 


60.5 


450 


72.5 


500 


37.0 


336 


91.8 


Calvert 


608 


81.2 


229 


96.2 


232 


22.1 


117 


97.5 


Kent 


578 


54.0 


320 


61.1 


256 


41.4 


124 


76.5 


Somerset 


883 


54.4 


385 


57.9 


516 


42.4 


223 


75.3 


Talbot 


639 


46.5 


372 


56.3 


380 


51.1 


140 


68.0 




1,440 


42.2 


927 


73.5 










Frederick 


3,154 


50.7 


1,237 


51.3 


252 


35^8 


io7 


57^2 


Cecil 


1,316 


45.3 


689 


53.1 


140 


40.3 


93 


76.2 


Anne Arundel 


3,687 


57.9 


1,858 


70.9 


*73 


1.6 


263 


53.1 


Dorchester 


876 


39.1 


513 


51.1 


501 


46.2 


185 


57.6 




4,500 


42.2 


1.013 


32.0 


765 


46.3 


321 


88.9 




6,867 


39.8 


3,089 


49.2 


487 


27.2 


fl42 


43.8 


Wicomico 


1,113 


37.8 


548 


43.6 


386 


33.0 


276 


68.8 


Allegany 


3,811 


34.7 


1,367 


32.8 


6 


3.1 


12 


18.2 


Washington 


2,582 


25.3 


858 


32.8 


19 


8.3 


4 


9.1 




2,902 


25.2 


1,295 


33.9 


*155 


2.0 


376 


88.3 




1,345 


32.0 


104 


6.7 


107 


14.7 





0.0 



Colored 



* Includes 27 pupils from Anne Arundel and 97 pupils from Prince George's transported 
to elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College at State expense. 

t Includes 59 pupils transported to Baltimore City senior high schools at expense of 
Baltimore County. 



Percent of Pupils Transported; Schools to Which 123 
Transportation Was Provided 



TABLE 102 



Number of County Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public 
Expense, Year Ending July 31, 1942 







White 




White 


Schools 








Schools With Elementary 


Having 








Grades Only 












County 














Total 










Both 


High 


Colored 


Number 










High 


School 


Schools 


of 




One- 


Two- 




and Ele- 


Pupils 




Different 




Teacher 


Teacher 


Graded 


mentary 


Only 




Schools 




Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


Grades 








44 


68 


174 


100 


46 


150 


582 






2 


17 


6 




1 


30 


Anne Arundel 




3 


19 


2 




3 


31 


Baltimore 




4 


22 


8 




11 


48 


Calvert 




1 


4 






5 


11 






3 


2 


5 




4 


14 


Carroll 


2 


2 


6 


8 




5 


24 


Cecil 


2 


3 


1 


7 




4 


18 






1 


1 


5 




9 


16 




i 


3 


5 


5 




12 


33 


Frederick 




6 


14 


5 




7 


34 


Garrett 


a 


5 


3 


5 






31 


Harford 


1 




3 


a8 




7 


19 








4 


3 




3 


11 


Kent 




6 


1 


3 




8 


19 




2 


4 


19 


4 




15 


51 


Prince George's 




1 


15 


6 


5 


6 


33 


Queen Anne's 


2 


3 


7 




5 


6 


23 


St. Mary's 


5 


8 


1 




2 


11 


27 




1 


1 


4 


2 


2 


8 


18 


Talbot 


3 


2 


2 


3 


1 


11 


22 




1 


5 


16 


5 


3 


1 


31 




1 


2 


5 


5 


1 


5 


19 


Worcester 




3 


3 


5 




8 


19 



a Six of these to elementary only. 



124 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 103 
Capital Outlay, Year Ending July 31, 1942 



County 



Total Counties. 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Balto. City 

Elementary . . 
Vocational . . . 
Junior High . 
Senior High . . 

Total State 



White Elementary 



One- 
Teacher 
Schools 



$683.34 



92 

25 
266 
298 



35 



$683.34 



Two- 
Teacher 
Schools 



$14,083.24 



533.00 
i58!46 



95.50 



398.87 
,108.20 
53.57 



29.26 
,686.90 



19.54 



$14,083.24 



Graded 
Schools 



$975,846.19 

6,562.24 
20,141.04 
31,554.31 
332.61 
98.95 
736.00 
3,155.51 
1,145.85 



5,524.91 
2,747.94 
2,231.65 
1,437.88 
43.94 
301,293.94 
355,650.61 
3,769.86 
16.79 
879.77 



101,273.74 
118,090.29 
19,158.36 

58,584.39 
58,584.39 



All 

Elementary 
Schools 



$1,034,430.58 



$990,612.77 

6,562.24 
20,674.04 
31,554.31 
491.01 
98.95 
736.00 
3,155.51 
1,333.85 



5,948.86 
6,122.34 
2,583.43 
1,437.88 
73.20 
310,980.84 
355,650.61 
3,769.86 
16.79 
879.77 



101,273.74 
118,111.18 
19,158.36 

58,584.39 
58,584, 



$1,049,197.16 



White 
High 
Schools 



I, 258. 27 



26,226.72 
6,883.96 
6,147.59 

$417,020,33 



Colored 
Schools 



$377,762.06 


$93,085.84 


9,404.02 


43.36 


2,995.82 


2,178.84 


6,210.49 


25,765.35 


7,110.42 


470.05 


40.50 


16.09 


44,962.98 


95.00 


7,338.28 


100.80 


2,557.79 


4,783.96 


3,177.04 


7.01 


6,525.06 


413.92 


39,729.27 




1,711.29 


15.00 


3,862.53 


791.24 


14.64 


146.31 


168,862.14 


13,568.03 


60,174.49 


43,455.42 


195.43 




576.45 


124.32 


7,701.56 


921.43 


158.84 




2,574.80 




1,338.22 


189.71 



140,276.16 
136,425.64 

638.41 
3,076.51 

135.60 

$233,362.00 



a Includes $1,216.05 spent for the administration building, 
b Includes $25.54 spent for the administration building, 
c Includes $688.74 spent for the administration building, 
d Includes $16,583.36 spent for the administration building, 
e Includes $134,525.00 from Federal Works Agency, 
f Includes $3,494.49 spent for the administration building. 
For basic data by county, see Tables XVIII to XXII, pages 204 to 209. 



Capital Outlay; School Bonds Authorized, Issued 
and Outstanding 



125 



TABLE 104— School Bonds Authorized and Issued in 1941-42 



County 


Author 
Year 


ization 
Chapter 


Amount 
Authorized 
and Issued 
for Schools 


Date 
of Issue 


First 
and Final 
Payment of 
Principal 


Rate 
of Interest 
Percent 




1941 
1941 
1939 


416 
744 
340 


$800,000 
500,000 
170,000 


Sept. 1941 
Oct. 1941 
Jan. 1942 


1942-1961 
1942-1961 
1952-1966 


1.6 
1.75 
2.25 . 



TABLE 105— School Bonds Outstanding as of July 31, 1942 







1942 Assessable 




Percent that 






Basis Taxable 


Assessable Basis 


Indebtedness 


County 


School Bonds 


at Full Rate 


Back of Each 


for School Bonds 




Outstanding 


for County 


Dollar of School 


is of Total 




July 31, 1942 


Purposes 


Indebtedness 


County Basis 


Total Counties 


$18,994,578 


$1,311,958,656 


$69 


1.4 




3,323,000 


96,217,337 


30 


3.5 


Anne Arundel 


al, 149, 531 


62,841,652 


55 


1.8 




2,745,667 


304,162,702 


111 


.9 


Calvert 


b58,500 


7,199,597 


123 


.8 




cl25,000 


15,463,883 


124 


.8 






43,668,057 






Cecil 


310,000 


47,316,356 


153 


.1 


Charles 


108,000 


12,568,795 


116 


.9 


Dorchester 


469,500 


24,877,920 


53 


1.9 


Frederick 


1,117,000 


72,024,655 


64 


1.6 






19,649,306 








c235,200 


62,303,853 


265 


!4 




331,450 


20,378,564 


61 


1.6 


Kent 




18,225,990 






Montgomery 


d4, 429 ,795 


174,794,495 


39 


2^5 


Prince George's 


e2, 067, 435 


117,608,554 


57 


1.8 




f 180, 000 


17,876,920 


99 


1.0 






9,201,357 








60,000 


12,637,072 


2ii 


!5 


Talbot 


166,000 


23,433,615 


141 


.7 




1,103,500 


92,323,772 


84 


1.2 




g841,000 


35,105,931 


42 


2.4 


Worcester 


174,000 


22,078,273 


127 


.8 


Baltimore City 


hl6,069,777 


1,298,397,236 


81 


1.2 


Entire State 


$35,064,355 


$2,610,355,892 


$74 


1.3 



a Reduced by $96,469 in sinking fund. 

b Excludes $100,000 authorized but unissued and $25,000 in short term loans, 
c Excludes $5,000 in short term loans. 

d Reduced by $159,730 available through issue of refunding bonds held for payment of 
bonds included in total outstanding. 

e Reduced by $237,565 in sinking fund, 
f Excludes $30,000 authorized but unissued, 
g Excludes $280,000 authorized but unissued, 
h Reduced by $1,291,522 in sinking fund. 



126 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 106 

School Debt* and Interest Payments}- Per Pupil Belonging, 1942 



County 



County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 



School 
Debt per 

Pupil 
Belonging 



Interest 
Payments 
per Pupil 
Belonging 



$111.68 


$4.32 


219.38 


6.93 


95.51 


4.52 


110.13 


5.15 


27.75 


1.26 


39.82 


1.54 


67.74 


1.97 


29.29 


1.08 


103.07 


3.81 


119.13 


4.74 


35.90 


.89 



County 



Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City 

Total State 



School 
Debt per 

Pupil 
Belonging 



$93.79 


$3.17 


287.63 


11.79 


114.03 


4.26 


74.88 


1.62 


16.12 


.60 


55.93 


2.38 


85.95 


3.27 


148.48 


4.20 


45.49 


2.43 


148.21 


7.09 


$125.90 


$5.40 



* See Table 105, page 125 for school bonds outstanding. 

f See Table XVII, page 203 for interest payments on bonded indebtedness. 



TABLE 107 



Value of School Property, 1922-1942 



Year 


Value of School Property 


Value Per Pupil Enrolled 


Maryland 


Counties 


Baltimore 
Cityt 


Maryland 


Counties 


Baltimore 
Cityf 


1922 


$20,453,646 


$10,014,638 


$10,439,008 


$82 


$68 


$103 


1923 


22,236,638 


11,796,630 


10,440,008 


87 


77 


100 


1924 


28,264,507 


12,813,396 


15,451,111 


110 


85 


147 


1925 


33,622,503 


14,946,810 


18,675,693 


129 


97 


164 


1926 


38,865,024 


16,704,564 


22,160,460 


148 


108 


205 


1927 


48,654,045 


17,889,796 


30,764,249 


182 


114 


277 


1928 


51,765,517 


18,994,670 


32,770,847 


191 


120 


291 


1929 


52,801,013 


19,920,102 


32,880,911 


193 


124 


290 


1930 


55,741,316 


21,483,720 


34,257,596 


201 


132 


297 


1931 


61,141,759 


23,830,725 


37,311,034 


217 


144 


321 


1932 


64,116,448 


24,608,923 


39,507,525 


222 


146 


331 


1933 


66,030,676 


25,350,740 


40,679,936 


225 


147 


335 


1934 


72,241,647 


25,501,303 


46,740,344 


246 


149 


384 


1935 


74,116,872 


26,847,518 


47,269,354 


251 


156 


384 


1936 


74,429,453 


26,778,790 


47,650,663 


250 


155 


380 


1937 


*78,573,662 


♦29,656,237 


48,917,425 


♦264 


♦171 


395 


1938 


*81,336,202 


♦31,702,972 


49,633,230 


♦277 


♦184 


410 


1939 


♦82,477,467 


♦32,801,326 


49,676,141 


♦278 


♦188 


408 


1940 


♦86,373,506 


♦36,605,396 


49,768,110 


♦291 


♦208 


412 


1941 


♦87,253,746 


♦37,426,526 


49,827,220 


♦292 


♦210 


414 


1942 


♦88,171,154 


♦38,442,796 


49,728,358 


♦296 


♦213 


421 



* Includes value of equipment in Maryland counties, but excludes value of administration 
buildings. 

t Excludes value of equipment, and also of administration buildings, warehouses, and 
storage buildings. 



School Debt and Interest Payments per Pupil ; 
Value of School Property 



127 



In 1939-40, Maryland ranked 24th among the States in aver- 
age value of property per pupil enrolled . 



TABLE 108 

Value of School Property, Including Equipment, Per Pupil Belonging, 1942 



County 


School Property Used 
by White Pupils 


School Property Used 
by Colored Pupils 


tValue 


Average 
Number 
Belonging 


Value 

Per 
White 
Pupil 


tValue 


Average 
Number 
Belonging 


Value 

Per 
Colored 
Pupil 


Total Counties jjg|| 


$35,402,368 


141,939 


$249 


$2,024,158 


27,136 


$75 


36,343,173 


143,163 


254 


2,099,623 


26,919 


78 




6,217,775 


14,886 


351 


85,217 


261 


327 




1,904,300 


8,751 


218 


°138,365 


3,285 


42 




4,700,450 


22,923 


205 


266,650 


2,008 


133 


Calvert 


133,350 


964 


138 


°49,475 


1,144 


43 




645,297 


2,417 


267 


73,000 


722 


101 


Carroll 


1,270,272 


6,046 


210 


20,600 


377 


55 


Cecil 


1,175,525 


4,114 


286 


39,970 


462 


87 


Charles 


J341.100 


2,046 


167 


J129.350 


1,641 


79 


Dorchester 


965,100 


3,189 


303 


°106,450 


1,366 


78 




1,895,700 


8,492 


223 


111,560 


884 


126 


Garrett 


°501,225 


4,630 


116 










tl. 109, 850 


5,663 


196 


63,650 


888 


72 


Howard 


678,350 


2,873 


236 


23,750 


661 


36 


Kent 


178,597 


1,558 


115 


24,884 


766 


32 




6,088,400 


13.424 


454 


142,900 


1,977 


72 




t2, 861, 700 


14,893 


192 


283,700 


3,237 


88 




562,900 


1,740 


324 


°49,900 


664 


75 


St. Mary's 


169,400 


1.160 


146 


°26,300 


953 


28 


Somerset 


°495,600 


2.251 


220 


60,250 


1,470 


41 


Talbot 


526,434 


2.025 


260 


53,950 


943 


57 




2,788.650 


12.567 


222 


47,100 


272 


173 


Wicomico 


1,623.998 


4.134 


393 


220.452 


1,530 


144 




509,200 


2,417 


211 


82,150 


1,408 


58 


Baltimore City 


*42,273.314 


77,771 


544 


*7, 455, 044 


30,656 


243 


State 


78,616,487 


220,934 


356 


9,554.667 


57, 575 


166 



t No valuations are included for administration buildings, warehouses, or storage buildings. 
* Excludes value of equipment for Baltimore City. 
Excludes value of rented buildings. 

t Excludes value of property owned by the Federal government. 



128 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 109 
County Tax Levy 1942-1943 



County 



Total 
County 
Levy 



Levy for Public Schools 



Current 
Expenses 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



Total 



Levy for 
Purposes 
Other than 
Schools 



Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel t. 
Baltimore! • • • • 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick! 

Garrettf 

Harfordt 

Howardf 

Kentt 

Montgomery . . . 
Pr. George's . . . 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington! . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Balto. City f . . . 

Entire State . . . 



$18,583,981 

al, 734, 871 
bl, 548, 050 
c4, 014, 966 
111,562 
230,155 
e422,183 
497,517 
182,413 
f496,183 
854,444 
g503,735 
704,979 
348,519 
242,729 
h2, 605, 597 
1,404,062 
211,727 
102,483 
204,462 
265,902 
1,056,667 
544,316 
296,459 

k49,200,379 

$67,784,360 



$7,472,065 

763 , 589 
471,371 
dl, 224, 164 
45,054 
85,550 
246,189 
243,899 
73,054 
145,455 
407,800 
105,233 
330,000 
126,990 
95,274 
1,018,377 
820,070 
99,550 
46,401 
62,528 
124,813 
615,083 
210,000 
111,621 

k9, 187, 233 

$16,659,298 



$1,592,060 

♦258,912 
109,545 
278,978 
*10,373 
*11,455 



$495,693 

34,372 
24,500 
12,000 
2,000 
5,000 
19,500 



♦32,730 
♦11,585 
*33,897 
♦117,837 



♦26,266 
♦23,238 



4,000 

"3 1666 

gll,575 
1,500 
1,500 



h+222,452 
♦186,983 
♦7,700 
♦2,921 
♦8,233 
♦20,380 
♦129,825 
♦75,485 
♦23,265 

2,177,457 

$3,769,517 



342,550 
26,000 



8,196 



$495,693 



$9,559,818 

1,056,873 
605,416 
1,515,142 
57,427 
102,005 
265,689 
276,629 
88,639 
179,352 
528,637 
gll6,808 
357,766 
151,728 
95,274 
hi, 583,379 
1,033,053 
107,250 
49,322 
78,957 
145,193 
744,908 
285,485 
134,886 

kll.364,690 



$9,024,163 

a677,998 
b942,634 
c2, 499, 824 
54,135 
128,150 
el56,494 
220,888 
93,774 
f316,831 
325,807 
g386,927 
347,213 
196,791 
147,455 
hi, 022, 218 
371,009 
104,477 
53,161 
125,505 
120,709 
311,759 
258,831 
161,573 

k37,835,689 



$20,924,508 $46,859,852 



* Includes funds for debt service paid directly by county commissioners. 
fFor Calendar year 1943. 

a Excludes $7,920 due from State for care of insane and $65,620 due from State Roads 
Commission for bond retirement. 

b Excludes $52,980 estimated as due from State from Lateral Roads Gasoline Tax. 

c Excludes $350,000 estimated as due from the State. 

d Includes $5,000 for teachers retired prior to 1927. 

e Excludes $3,000 due from State for care of insane. 

f Excludes $2,769 due from State for forest fires, ferries and insane.. 

g Excludes $144,572 from uncollected taxes for which there are orders and notes out- 
standing and $7,211 due from State for indigent sick and forest fires. School debt service 
includes $10,000 unpaid from preceding levies for McHenry School. 

h Excludes proceeds of bond issues totalling $412,000, including $159,730 for schools, 
used to redeem bonds previously issued. 

k Excludes State and federal aid for public welfare $3,914.184 ; highways $3 202,550 ; 
education $977,843; retirement of teachers $564,890; salaries of judges $17,875; Public Im- 
provement Commission (from loan funds) $168,260; Total $8,845,602. 



1942-43 Levy in County and Incorporated Places and 129 
Percent For Schools 



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130 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 111 

Assessable Basis Taxable at Full Rate for County Purposes 
in Thousands of Dollars 

(Data Furnished by State Tax Commission ) 



County 


*1923 


♦1928 


1938 


1940 


1941 


1942 


Total Counties 


$661,725 


$883,508 


$1,025,573 


°$1,157,248 


°$1 ,213,364 


t$l,311,959 


Allegany 


69,886 


80,715 


*83,160 


*96,766 


98,030 


96,217 


Anne Arundel 


30,692 


47,544 


♦55,750 


*58,812 


62,099 


62,842 




104,232 


157,654 


199,908 


239,416 


257,371 


304,163 


Calvert 


4,427 


5,305 


6,181 


♦6,381 


6,834 


7,200 


Caroline 


14 , 027 


15,283 


♦14,813 


15,665 


15, 173 


♦15,464 


Carroll 


33,382 


39,875 


38,633 


♦41,396 


41,724 


43,668 




23 , 189 


30 , 408 


40 , 402 


*41 , 519 


43 , 994 


47,316 


Charles 


8,394 


9,938 


10,145 


*1 1,709 


11,826 


12,569 




18,987 


21,918 


26,403 


*24,433 


24,832 


24,878 




51,248 


65,234 


66,548 


69,634 


68,293 


72,025 


Garrett 


16,303 


21,653 


♦19,661 


19,959 


19,444 


♦19,649 


Harford 


28,580 


39,763 


53,192 


*57,608 


59,972 


62,304 


Howard 


15,670 


18,063 


18,386 


♦19,385 


19,959 


20,379 


Kent 


14,519 


16,162 


♦17,062 


*17,505 


17,694 


♦18,226 




45,503 


77,889 


109,635 


♦143,746 


155,486 


174,794 


Prince George's 


33,651 


59,312 


77,260 


♦°96,035 


°103,887 


tll7,608 


Queen Anne's 


14,793 


16,692 


16,778 


♦18,069 


18,176 


17,877 


St. Mary's 


7,163 


8,289 


♦9,084 


9,369 


9,457 


♦9,201 




10,609 


12,392 


11,920 


*1 1,764 


12,494 


12,637 


Talbot 


16,927 


20,478 


21,682 


*23,437 


23,323 


23,434 


Washington 


62 , 570 


72,908 


76,348 


♦80,311 


*87,833 


92,324 


Wicomico 


20,394 


25,092 


*3 1,538 


33,602 


33,876 


♦35,106 


Worcester 


16,579 


20,941 


21,084 


*20,727 


21,587 


22,078 


Baltimore City 


902,208 


1,255,978 


1,231,046 


1,237,321 


1,255,604 


1,298,397 


Entire State 


$1,563,933 


$2,139,486 


$2,256,619 


°$2,394,569 


$2,468,968 


$2,610,356 



* Includes reassessment figures. 

Includes $3,257,010 for Greenbelt. 

t Includes $5,157,010 for Greenbelt. 



TABLE 112 

Assessable Wealth Back of Each Public School Pupil Belonging 1941-42 



County 



Total and Aver. 



Baltimore 

Montgomery. . . 

Cecil 

Harford 

Talbot 

Kent 

Frederick 

Queen Anne's. . 

Washington 

Carroll 

Pr. George's. . . 
Allegany 



S3, 



3 3 fc 



.2 c 



$1,311,959 



304,163 
174,794 
47,316 
62,304 
23,434 
18,226 
72,025 
17,877 
92,324 
43,668 
117,608 
96,217 



60 

C t» 
£ O 

o o 

«-§ 

top 

a bo'* 
> c 2 



170,087 



24,931 
15,401 
4,577 
6,551 
2,967 
2,325 
9,376 
2,404 
12,839 
6,425 
18,130 
15,148 



*1 

«-§ 5 

a 

£ CO 
m rt:3 



$7,713 



12,200 
11,350 
10,338 
9,511 
7,898 
7,839 
7,682 
7,436 
7,191 
6,797 
6,487 
6,360 



County 



Wicomico 

Worcester 

Howard 

Dorchester. . . . 
Anne Arundel . . 

Caroline 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 

Calvert 

Charles 

Somerset 

Baltimore City. 

Entire State . . . 



8« a. 

«- u 

£^S, 

S ? c g 



o a 



$35,106 
22,078 
20,379 
24,878 
62,842 
15,464 

9,201 
19,649 

7,200 
12,569 
12,637 

1,298,397 
$ 

2,610,356 



bfl 03 

II 
la 

5 b03j 

> c2 



5,664 
3,826 
3,535 
4,555 
12,036 
3,139 
2,113 
4,630 
2,108 
3,687 
3,720 

108,427 

278,514 



£^m 

M w 3 



$6,198 
6,770 
5,766 
5,462 



,225 
4,926 
4,355 
4,244 
3,415 
3,409 
3,397 



11,975 
$9,372 



Assessable Basis by Year, per Pupil and by Source 



131 



I 



if 



f 



Ill 



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i 



i I llllI£lllllllgllllS 11111 1 S 



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i i iiiiisiiigiggaimi mil i a 

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i 1 11 liliiiiip mm mm 1 1 
g § I? ia'aa mm I I 



tj< (0 "«* M fH 



- i 



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;BSHE 




iliii 


mi; 











Real and 
Tangible 
Personal Prop- 
erty Assessed 
for County 
Purposes 


! 1 silSillilSlsis-iiiiS USsi 1 1 


1 1 SSgigssSiSlfglgglgl iiSli s 1 


I = - 5 3 


Total Basis 
Assessable? at 
Full Rate for 
County Purposes 


i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiagii 1 1 


I 1 ssSlllsIllSlsllSlsl gills 1 I 


3 g §8 t -SSSSS?!S§SS5 e, S8S!iS3 ||53S § 2 

d - a 



p liili ii 



132 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 114 

Calculated County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates, 

1942-43 





1942-43 Calculated County 








Tax Rate for School* 


Total 


Additional 


County 










Published 


Rates in 










County 


Districts 












Tax Rate 


and In- 




Current 


Debt 


Capital 




1942-43 


corporated 




Expenses 


Service 


Outlay 


Total 




Places 


All Counties 


$.570 


$.121 


$.038 


$.729 






Equalization Fund Counties 


.644 


.143 


.019 


.806 






Allegany 


.794 


J. 269 


.035 


1.098 


$1.38 


$.35-1.10 


Anne Arundelt 


.750 


.174 


.039 


.963 


1.45 


.67-3.62 


Calvert 


.626 


J. 144 


.027 


.797 


1.50 


.60-1.10 


Caroline 


.553 


J.074 


.032 


.659 


1.35 


.25- .80 


Carroll 


.564 


.045 


.609 


.90 


.30-1.10 


Charles 


.581 


^092 


.032 


.705 


1.25 


.50- .65 




.585 


M36 




.721 


1.45 


.65-1.25 


Frederickf 


.566 


M64 


'.ooi 


.734 


1.12 


.10-1.15 


Garrettf 


.536 




.059 


.595 


2.33 


.15- .90 


Howardf 


.623 


t'.iii 


.007 


.744 


1.40 


§.04-§.09 


Kentt 


.523 






.523 


1.20 


.40-1.05 


Prince George's 


.697 


t!i59 


!622 


.878 


1.35 


.32-2.30 




.557 


J. 046 




.603 


.90 


.30- .90 


St. Mary's 


°.504 


J. 032 




.536 


1.15 


.80 




°.495 


J. 065 


.065 


.625 


1.19 


.75-1.53 


Talbot 


.533 


t.087 




.620 


1.11 


.70-1.00 




.666 


M41 




.807 


1.10 


.40-1.00 




.598 


J. 215 




.813 


1.38 


.40-1.00 




°.506 


J. 105 




.611 


1.10 


.55-1.20 


Non-Equalization Fund Counties 


.479 


.095 


.060 


.634 








d.402 


.092 


.004 


.498 


1.22 


.13- .23 


Cecil 


.515 


:.069 




.584 


1.00 


.40-1.13 


Harfordf 


.530 


J. 042 


!6o2 


.574 


1.00 


.58- .83 


Montgomery 


.583 


hM27 


.196 


.906 


1.50 


.32-1.60 


Baltimore City f 


.708 


.168 




.875 




2.65 


Entire State 


.638 


.144 


.019 


.801 







* Obtained by dividing county ievy for school purposes by assessable basis taxable at the 
full rate for county purposes, 
t For calendar year 1943. 

° Additional must be made available to meet 51 cent requirement. 
$ Levied directly by county commissicrers. 
8 Plus cost of water. 



County Tax Rates; Parent-Teacher Associations 



133 



TABLE 115 

Parent-Teacher Associations in County White and Colored Schools 



County 



Total and 

County Average 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Queen Anne's 

Somerset 

Prince George's . . . 

Howard 

Wicomico 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Charles 

Frederick 

Harford 

Dorchester 

Garrett 

Cecil 

Washington 

St. Mary's 



White Schools 



Number 



1941 1942 



463 

30 
51 
7 
9 
13 
39 
19 
13 
43 
15 
18 
18 
34 
10 
12 
7 
21 
22 
17 
33 
14 
15 



452 

29 
49 

7 

9 
13 
41 
19 
14 
44 
12 
18 
18 
33 

9 
10 

7 
22 
24 
15 
28 
12 
16 



Percent 



1941 1942 



69.9 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
97.5 
100.0 
76.5 
82.7 
88.2 
90.0 
72.0 
79.1 
76.9 
75.0 
70.0 
60.0 
59.5 
51.5 
51.6 
45.2 
24.2 
16.7 



71.7 
100.0 



100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 

100. 
93.3 
88.0 
85.7 
85.7 
81.8 
76.7 
75.0 
71.4 
70.0 
64.7 
61.5 
51.7 
48.3 
42.9 
28.1 
17.6 



County 



Total and 
County Average 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Charles 

Kent 

Prince George's . . 

Wicomico 

Montgomery 

Queen Anne's. . . . 

St. Mary's 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Harford 

Calvert 

Howard 

Somerset 

Carroll 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Washington 



Colored Schools 



Number 



1941 



323 

39 
18 
3 
8 
23 
12 
45 
15 
20 
18 
17 
19 
12 
16 
14 
12 
6 
15 
4 
5 
1 
1 



1942 



286 

40 
17 
4 
6 
19 
10 
44 
13 
19 
17 
15 
12 
8 
11 
13 
14 
6 
9 
4 
5 





134 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



COUNTY AND STATE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 
AND SUPERVISION 

The salary of a Maryland county superintendent as fixed in 
the State minimum salary schedule depends on size of teaching 
staff and years of experience. Counties, however, may and in 
most instances do pay salaries above those in the minimum 
salary schedule, the range in salaries in 1941-42 being from 
$3,090 to $6,600 and $8,292. In 1942 the average salary was 
$4,469 and the median $4,350. (See Table XIV, page 200.) 

There were ten counties with fewer than 150 teachers, four 
having from 150 to 199 teachers, and nine with 200 or more 
teachers. The average number of teachers per county was 230, 
while the median county had 155 teachers. The smallest county 
had 64 teachers and the largest 627. Several counties which 
would have had more than 200 teachers had they not carried 
forward a policy of school consolidation and transportation have 
replaced the additional problems of a large teaching staff with 
those of the transportation service. (See Table X, pages 195-6.) 

Conferences of the County Superintendents with the State Department Staff 

Long Term Study Guide Preliminary to Curriculum Construc- 
tion for High Schools. In order to carry out the most important 
recommendation of the 1941 Survey of Maryland Public Schools 
for a long-term study program, a bulletin, "A Curriculum Study 
Guide, Maryland Looks Ahead in Education," was prepared by 
the State high school and special supervisors as a guide in the 
formation of committees and in carrying out a study program 
which will extend over several years. The Guide covers the 
basic study necessary to formulate and to reformulate a definite 
conception of the function of modern education — a basic phi- 
losophy of the purpose and place of education in a democracy. 
This preparatory study is preliminary to preparation of a bulle- 
tin on procedures in production of curriculum materials which 
will be forthcoming after principals and teachers working in 
study groups in the various counties and regions of the State 
under the leadership of the high school supervisors have formu- 
lated their basic philosophy. 

Meetings of county superintendents and State department 
high school supervisors were held in the summer and fall of 1941 
for the purpose of considering the "Orientation Study Guide" 
which sets up the actual machinery for a long time continuous, 
constructive study program to achieve the following ends: 

I The clarification of the purposes of secondary education today, 
resulting in general agreement on a sound philosophy of education 
by the great majority of high school teachers of the State 



County and State School Administration 



135 



II Careful analysis of the individual pupil of secondary school age 
and the society into which he will fit, to the end that decisions may 
be made as to what should constitute the high school program of 
studies 

Decision as to how subject-matter material shall be selected, 
organized, assembled, and made available 

Actual production of various curriculum units, first, probably, on 
an experimental basis. Try-out of those materials and provision 
for their evaluation 

V Constant continuous revision and improvement to prevent materials 
from becoming stagnant and out-of-date 

Through specially organized Study Groups, through individual 
faculty meetings, through general meetings of all high school 
teachers, and through reading various pertinent materials it 
was planned that all high school teachers would be led to clarify 
their philosophy of secondary education, to see possibilities in the 
way of additional curriculum materials, to realize the various 
ways in which materials could be selected, organized, and pre- 
sented, and to get a general picture of the high school program 
of the future. The State Committee was planning to coordinate 
the work of the various county and inter-county groups. 

The work of the county committees was started and there was 
admirable cooperation. The elementary school supervisors at- 
tended many of the meetings and made valuable contributions. 
At first, two meetings a month were held. After Pearl Harbor, 
because of demands on the teachers resulting from the national 
emergency and because of the shortage of tires and gasoline the 
number of meetings had to be curtailed and in some cases elimi- 
nated. 

Cooperation with the Nation's War Effort. After December 7, 
1941 cooperation of all parts of the school's program with the 
nation's war effort became a major objective emphasized in all 
committee work and conferences of the staff of the State De- 
partment of Education with county and City school officials 
during the school year. This work centered around the following 
defense committees made up of county superintendents and 
members of the staff of the State Department of Education: 

1. Protection of Life and Property 

2. Relating the Schools to Outside Agencies 

3. Agriculture and Defense Training 
Repair of Farm Machinery 

4. Home Economics and Canteen Work 

5. Physical Education and Health 

6. Adapting the Schools' Program to Wartime Conditions 

7. Vocational Defense Training Program 



136 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



1. Protection of Life and Property — The sixteen-page report of the 
superintendents' committee on protection of life and property released on 
Dec. 29, 1941 was prepared with the advice and approval of Col. Henry S. 
Barrett, Maryland Director of Air Raid Precautions. It provides directions 
of the U. S. Office of Civilian Defense and interpretations for Maryland on 
what to do when the air raid warning sounds; air raid drills; air raid 
refuges of various types depending on construction of school building; 
what to do about incendiaries; the organization, procedures and training 
required to provide necessary protection of life and property ; and means of 
securing the cooperation of parents in carrying out the procedures adopted. 
This material was made available to every principal and teacher in Mary- 
land public schools and each county superintendent assumed responsibility 
for seeing that the suggestions were put into effect. It was also released 
to non-public schools as suggestive material. 

2. Relating the Schools to Outside Agencies. 

a. Cooperation with 

(1) Civilian Defense Council 

(2) Red Cross 

(3) Health Department — training of pupils and adults 

(4) Farmers and producers 

(5) Extension Service, University of Maryland 

(6) U. S. Department of Agriculture (State and local) 

(7) Sale of tJ. S. stamps and bonds 

(8) Salvage collection of paper, rubber, rags, tin cans and scrap 

(9) Others 

b. School buildings and equipment were made available at all times 
for instruction and information in defense activities such as air 
raid and fire wardens, first aid, home nursing, etc.; adult recrea- 
tion and training adults in physical fitness; group housing in an 
emergency. 

c. Teachers and specially selected pupils or organized groups of 
pupils, such as scouts, were assigned in accordance with their 
interests and abilities and given necessary training and drill in 
first aid, air raid precautions, fire protection, dispensing of food, 
collection and conservation of metals, waste paper, etc. Teachers 
conducted classes for volunteer firemen, air raid wardens, casualty 
corps, and other adult groups. Teachers and pupils very gener- 
ally were given instruction in first aid and nutrition by physicians, 
nurses, and qualified public school teachers of physical educa- 
tion, home economics and science. 

d. Clerical service for defense activities was performed by com- 
mercial departments in high schools. 

e. It was recommended that each school be provided with special 
equipment for first aid, blankets, cots, etc.; fire extinguishing 
apparatus including sand, water, shovels; and a large supply of 
non perishable food in the cafeteria. 

f . A number of superintendents relieved one teacher of instructional 
duties to supervise the new duties resulting from the war. 

g. Special additional funds were requested from county commis- 
sioners for extra costs of heat, light and janitorial service due 
to defense activities. 

3. Agriculture and Defense — Training was given in the production, use, 
and storage of proper dietary foods for home consumption. The planting of 
victory vegetable gardens, including leafy vegetables, was encouraged and 
agriculture teachers cooperated with home economics teachers in planning 
for the canning and preservation of foods raised. 



Cooperation with the Nation's War Effort 



137 



The culture of crops designated for increased production by U. S., State, 
and local agricultural agencies and of feed was promoted. 

Quality production of poultry, swine, milk, etc., resulted in special 
emphasis on sanitation, inspection, grading and standardization. 

Economic production was emphasized, with more attention paid to ef- 
ficient management, reduction of debts, wise use of credit, use of labor 
saving machinery, and efficient placement of full and part time labor supply. 

In addition to instruction in the regular day school farm shop classes, 
training in maintenance, reconditioning and repair of farm machinery, 
buildings and equipment was given in federally financed national defense 
classes for out-of-school youth, and in evening classes financed by federal 
vocational George-Deen Funds for persons engaged in farming. 

Instruction in repair of tractors, trucks, automobiles and farm 
machinery was given by farm shop instructors, general shop instructors 
and local mechanics. Such training included repair of motors, transmissions 
and differentials, inspection for needed repair parts which can be ordered 
or made, metal work in simple welds and tempering. Training in opera- 
tion included driving by individuals under all conditions, and in maintenance, 
covered lubrication, cleaning and refueling. 

4. The Committee on Home Economics and Canteen Work recommended 

a. Maintenance of the regular home economics program as far 
as possible with the following objectives: 

(1) Continuance of the present program in home economics 
education to help maintain security, avoid emotional upsets 
and prepare girls for greater home responsibilities. 

(2) Emphasis in classes and home projects on nutrition, food 
production and preservation, home nursing, first aid, child 
care. 

(3) Promotion of the school cafeteria as a definite aid in nutri- 
tion education. 

(4) Cooperation with elementary school teachers in helping 
organize and develop units of instruction in nutrition. 

b. Extension of the home economics program in the emergency along 
the following lines: 

(1) Cooperation with agriculture teachers in the "Victory 
Garden" campaign to raise, store and conserve vegetables 
and fruits for home, school and other use. 

(2) Establishment of food preservation centers in the school 
home economics departments during the summer months. 

(3) Planning for emergency feeding of children of defense 
workers, school children and devastated families in case of 
disaster by accumulating stocks of non-perishable food 
materials, and training selected boys and girls for their 
duties in such a project. The Red Cross Canteen service 
cooperated in this program. 

(4) Training older girls to carry on a nursery center in or near 
the school to care for pre-school children whose parents are 
working in defense industries or whose homes are devastated. 

c. Use of home economics facilities in case of disaster for 

(1) Mass feeding 

(2) Distribution centers for food, clothing or health supplies 

(3) First aid 

(4) Care and feeding of children 



138 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



5. Physical Education, Health and National Defense — The need for 
physical fitness and recreation is more apparent today then ever before. 
Any basis for efficient living requires a fitness and recreation program. 
Therefore, all facilities, equipment, supplies, and leadership — both in and 
out of schools — in every community should be utilized to the fullest in 
promoting effective living. The primary effort should be concentrated on 
youth in the age group 12-30 who are most likely to participate in a 
vigorous physical fitness and recreation program. For the upper age group, 
greater stress can be placed on social activities with particular attention 
to home recreation. 

One of the first considerations should be a check of the health status by 
use of county health department personnel, county medical and dental 
associations' personnel, and family physicians and dentists. Such examina- 
tions should result in correction of remediable defects, the majority of 
which are very trivial yet necessary of correction, and the adaptation of 
physical and recreation activities to meet health and other needs. 

The physical education activities for in-school groups should consist 
of the present program enlarged to include more vigorous activities such 
as hiking, camping, etc. For the out-of-school groups, the activities would 
include : 

a. Social activities — including parties, social and country dancing, 
picnics, hiking, sailing, swimming, arts and crafts. 

b. Club and individual activities — first aid, life saving, swimming, 
hiking, winter sports, tennis, golf, archery, bowling, skeet and 
rifle shooting, handball, horseshoes, table tennis, etc. 

c. Team activities — softball, hockey, volleyball, touch football, 
soccer, basketball. 

The general plan included the use of each county games committee chair- 
man and a co-chairman from the twenty-three counties and a chairman 
for Baltimore City. These chairmen were expected to form operating 
councils of white and of colored laymen and laywomen in each of the 
communities, to promote an adequate physical fitness and recreation program. 

These chairmen were asked to make a survey of their respective areas, 
noting (buildings, rooms, bowling alleys, swimming pools, skating rinks, 
gymnasiums, athletic fields, riding academies, reservations, special activity) 
facilities that would or could be available for the program ; second — a survey 
of all possible personnel (physical educators, teachers of music, drawing, arts 
and crafts and life saving; hobby and games specialists) that might be 
utilized in the program; third — survey of the groups (members of athletic, 
social, civic, men's and women's clubs, industrial and youth organizations) 
or individuals who might take part as participants; and finally, a survey 
of the equipment and supplies already on hand. 

Each county and city group should operate to meet the specific needs 
of its area and to insure that needed facilities are kept open, and used 
under wise leadership. In any event, there should be careful supervision by 
the county chairman or executive to insure co-ordination with the present 
county and State defense plans. Operating and maintenance costs, including 
some travel, equipment, supplies, rentals, light and heat, as well as clerical 
service, must be provided. 

6. Recommendations of the Committee on Acceleration and Adjust- 
ment of the School Program. 

a. Release of county high school seniors not later than the first 
week in June in order that they may enter college or employ- 
ment. 



Cooperation in the Nation's War Effort 



139 



b. Adjustment of the school program so that individual pupils may- 
accept employment of the type which can be considered a 
part of the pupils' educational program and which may be 
supervised by the school. 

c. Make available during the regular school year, classes in 
vocational defense training to senior boys and girls and other 
pupils 17 years of age and consider such courses part of the 
regular school program. 

d. Encourage seniors and others, school leavers seventeen years 
old, to participate in the Vocational Defense Training Program 
during the summer. 

e. Accelerate but do not abbreviate the high school course for 
pupils preparing to take professional training in such fields as 
medicine, dentistry, engineering, nursing, etc., so that the 
college course may be completed by the age of 20. 

f. Develop the guidance program so that pupils may be prepared 
to engage in activities most needed at present. 

g. Close schools as early as possible, provided they remain open 
180 days as required by law, by utilizing Saturdays and other 
days normally considered holidays so that older pupils may 
help meet the acute labor shortage in industry, commerce and 
agriculture. 

h. Emphasize throughout the school program the privileges and 
responsibilities for each individual of living in a democracy. 

i. Emphasize the need of developing on the part of high school 
pupils an understanding of current events and their worldwide 
applications. 

j. See that specific opportunities are offered in the life and pro- 
gram of the school to practice democratic methods of behavior 
and action. 

k. See that teachers and pupils are relieved of as much unneces- 
sary strain as possible, in view of the extra duties and re- 
sponsibilities they are carrying. 

Early Closing of Schools Because of College Entrance and 
Work. Because of registration of freshmen by colleges of the 
State in June 1942 as well as the necessity or desirability of 
releasing students for war or agricultural work, the question 
of early closing of schools, especially for high school seniors, 
was proposed. Several counties made 180 days attendance as 
required by law by having sessions on Saturdays. (Table 2 on 
page 8 shows the early closing dates in 1942, especially for 
high school seniors and Table IX, page 194 shows number of days 
schools were in session in 1941-42.) 

The organization of summer schools for pupils of unusual 
ability was proposed to permit them to complete their high 
school course in a shorter period of time without lowering- 
standards. Montgomery County organized a summer school in 
1942. In all plans for acceleration it was stressed that health 
of pupils should not be sacrificed, and therefore, physical educa- 
tion must be given greater emphasis. 



140 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

Teachers Colleges Adapt Program to Meet Need for Additional 
Teachers. To meet the urgent demand for additional white 
elementary teachers there was evolved a plan for acceleration, 
not abbreviation, at the State Teachers Colleges at Towson, Frost- 
burg and Salisbury so that students in both the junior and 
senior classes could be made available for teaching positions in 
September 1942. The junior classes attended summer sessions in 
1942, to prepare them for employment on provisional certificates 
in September 1942, to be paid salaries at the rate of $1000 a 
year. They were to receive some credit for practice teaching 
on the job and to finish their requirements for the degree in the 
summer of 1943. During the emergency, students by attending 
summer and winter sessions will continue to complete the four- 
year course in three years. The number of men graduating is 
being reduced by the draft and the attraction of high salaries 
in the defense industries. Many girl high school graduates who 
would normally enter the teachers colleges are going into govern- 
ment and defense work because of the immediate high earnings 
which are possible and their feeling that they are thus contrib- 
uting more immediately to the pressing demands of the 
emergency. 

It becomes possible for freshmen to enroll at the teachers 
colleges in September and February although the main freshman 
class is to enroll in June. It is important for the superintendents 
and principals to guide as many graduates as possible who have 
the requisite qualifications to the teachers colleges if there is 
to be any possibility of meeting the shortage in teachers. 

Retirement of Dr. Albert S. Cook. In January 1942, the State 
Board of Education granted retirement to State Superintendent 
Albert S. Cook, to take effect as of March 1, 1942. 

resolutions adopted by the state board of education 
on february 25, 1942 on the retirement of dr. albert s. cook 

Dr. Albert S. Cook in retiring on March 1st, 1942, leaves the office of 
the State Superintendent of Schools in Maryland after more than twenty- 
one years of distinguished service as head of the State Public School 
System. After only seven years as a rural school teacher and as principal 
of the Bel Air Academy and the Franklin High School, he had been ap- 
pointed Superintendent of Schools in Baltimore County in 1900, and his 
notable achievements in that position brought him nation-wide recognition. 

Dr. Cook's assumption of the State Superintendency in 1920 came at a 
crucial time in the history of public education in Maryland. The General 
Education Board Survey had shown the need for the elimination of politics, 
for improving the school facilities and equipment, and for increasing the 
preparation of the teaching staff. As a result of the Survey, the Legislature 
had passed new school laws, the administration of which called for wisdom, 
initiative, and skill in leadership. These qualities Dr. Cook possessed to 
an unusual degree, and to them he added a deep sense of society's obligation 
to provide every child with the maximum opportunity to develop his 
capacities to the full. With Dr. Cook as the new State Superintendent, the 
whole Maryland school system dedicated itself to the improvement of in- 



Retirement of Doctor Albert S. Cook 



141 



struction. Under Dr. Cook's careful guidance the State undertook, through 
the Equalization Fund which he sponsored, to enable the financially poorer 
counties to maintain standard schools without prohibitive school taxes; 
through gradual but widespread consolidation of schools many children 
began to enjoy better school facilities and richer subject offerings; in the 
most remote school supervision of classroom teaching became the rule; 
the preparation of the teaching staff improved enormously; and the two- 
year Normal Schools became four-year degree-granting colleges. All school 
appointments were made on the basis of professional qualifications and 
ability. In 1922 the same year the Equalization Fund was started, a 
State minimum salary schedule was adopted, and in 1927 an actuarially 
sound Teachers' Retirement System was established. 

Always sensitive to the growing yet varying public needs, and realizing 
the obligation of the Public School System to meet those needs, Dr. Cook 
has developed in Maryland a sound program of vocational education, in- 
cluding vocational rehabilitation and educational guidance, adult educa- 
tion, and in recent months defense training classes. As the time became 
ripe, in 1939, he helped obtain for the principals and teachers of the State 
a greatly improved and scientific minimum salary schedule. Indeed, it is 
with reason that the Director of the 1941 State School Survey points out 
in the introduction to his report that most of the problems, largely ad- 
ministrative, which the 1915 Survey disclosed, have been courageously met 
during the intervening quarter of a century through sound planning and 
action — planning and action for which Dr. Cook has been primarily 
responsible. 

As State Superintendent, Dr. Cook has been truly the dominant figure 
among the public school forces in the State. He has welcomed advice, 
however, and has used and stressed democratic methods wherever in the 
school system these were feasible. Assistants, county school officials, and 
teachers with whom he has come into contact have been made to feel the 
value of their contributions and Dr. Cook's interest in their professional 
and personal welfare. No one has been readier or happier to recognize 
worth in others and, if possible, to reward it. These qualities, his high 
professional attainments, his unstinted devotion to the cause of public 
education, and his delightful sense of humor and magnetic personality 
have won for him the admiration and affection of the school people and his 
host of acquaintances and the respect of the public. 

On this occasion, when Dr. Cook is relinquishing his office as State 
Superintendent of Schools, the State Board of Education wishes to assure 
him of its appreciation of his sagacious and effective leadership and to 
wish for him many years of continued usefulness as a private citizen. 

The following testimonial which has been framed and hangs- 
beside his portrait in the entrance to the Department office ex- 
presses the feeling of the county superintendents and staff 
members of the State Department of Education upon the retire- 
ment of their leader who as State Superintendent since 1920 
had carried forward such a vigorous and successful fight for 
equal educational opportunities for all the children of Maryland* 



mm. 



Tc 

Albert 3. qook 

Greetings i 

T IS MEET on occasions for a group of people enlisted in a common 
cause formally to acknowledge any especially distinguished service rendered 
by one of their members. Accordingly, the School Superintendents of 
Maryland in conjunction with the Staff of the State Department of 
Education look upon your retirement from the State Superintendency as a peculiarly 
appropriate occasion on which to record their grateful appreciation for the intelligent, 
courageous, and unrelenting efforts you have put forth to promote the welfare of 
American school children, to advance the teaching profession, and to enrich the lives 
of the whole American people. 

(^During the forty -six years that you have devoted to public education in the State, 
phenomenal progress has been made. Most of the moves forward have had your active 
cooperation; none of them have lacked your personal encouragement; but many of the 
most significant ones have been due directly and largely to your wise and efficient 
leadership. Throughout these years your influence for a betterment of the schools has 
spread far beyond the bounds of the particular fields in which you labored, and the 
educational progress resulting from your personal efforts, first as Superintendent in 
Baltimore County and later as State Superintendent, has been reflected in public edu- 
cation throughout the country. 

For hundreds of thousands of American children school days have been made 
happier and more profitable as a result of your endeavors. Thousands of teachers, 
supervisors, and administrators have been enabled to render better public service 
because of professional standards attained under your educational leadership. And 
friendly ties between the people, the schools, and the State have been created and 
strengthened by the wisdom with which you directed and interpreted administration. 

(3^ We, the undersigned, who have been associated with you during much of the forty- 
six years, have been honored by the Group with a command to send you a message 
on their behalf at this time. We present this simple testimonial out of hearts that are 
filled with admiration and affection for you as an Educator, a Leader, and a Friend 

Edwin W. Broome Nicholas Orem 
Clarence G Cooper Franklin E. Rathbun 
George Fox C. Milton Wright 



142 



The State Superintendent; Teacher Demand and Supply; 143 
Changes in Certification Standards and Salaries 

appointment of dr. thomas g. pullen, jr., as state superintendent 

The State Board of Education on January 23, 1942, appointed 
Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State Superintendent of Schools 
effective March 1, 1942. Dr. Pullen had served as High School 
Principal in Catonsville, Superintendent of Schools in Talbot 
County, State Supervisor of High Schools, and Assistant State 
Superintendent in Administration since 1936. 

Relation of Teacher Supply to Demand in High Schools. The 
high schools which employ a larger percentage of men than the 
elementary schools, 40 as against 10 percent, are losing an even 
larger proportion of their teaching personnel to the military 
and defense services and to states which have higher salary 
schedules for teachers than Maryland. In certain fields such 
as industrial work, agriculture, physical education, science, 
mathematics and commercial work in which the need of training 
boys and girls for the increasing number of positions available 
in government, defense and war services is urgent, the turnover 
of teachers, especially of men, is appallingly high and a number 
of positions are unfilled. It is impossible to fill these positions 
with applicants from within the State who meet the qualifica- 
tions so that a larger proportion are being recruited from other 
States with lower salary scales and unqualified persons are being 
employed. The situation is becoming critical and steps must 
be taken to prevent further damage to the efficiency of the school 
system. 

The deferment of teachers of vocational agriculture, industrial 
education, industrial arts and physical education at least until 
the end of the school year had been recommended to local draft 
boards by the selective service system. The advisability of a 
similar procedure for principals of schools if schools are not to 
be disrupted was recommended by the county superintendents. 

Changes in Certification Standards and Salaries to Meet the 
Emergency. Certification was established to insure that we 
secure as permanent teachers the type we want. Teachers lack- 
ing some of the requirements receive provisional certificates and 
$200 less in salary. Substitute teachers are those employed in an 
emergency. During the war emergency we should get all the 
qualified teachers available, authorize few provisional certifi- 
cates, get the best available substitutes, and not lower standards 
for regular certificates. It may be advisable to pay substitutes 
the same salaries as beginning teachers. It was suggested 
that it may be necessary to have adjusted compensation to secure.- 
and hold teachers. 

A committee of superintendents appointed to confer with the 
Governor about raising teachers' salaries had a sympathetic hear- 
ing. They suggested that an appropriation be made to adjust 



144 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



teachers' salaries during the emergency. The action of other 
States and cities in meeting the situation had been published by 
the National Education Association and it was suggested that 
we prepare information showing the high turnover and what 
is being done to counteract the danger to the school systems. 
Turnover is lower in Baltimore City than in the counties probably 
due largely to the higher salaries in effect. It was brought out 
that Maryland ranks highest in the country in teaching load 
per elementary school teacher, and ranks low in effort, i. e., 
percent of funds devoted to support of schools compared with 
ability to finance them. 

The State Board of Education adopted the following changes 
in certificate regulations which had been recommended by the 
County Superintendents : 

1. The section of the certificate by-laws which forbids the issuance 
of Advanced First Grade Certificates shall be inoperative during 
the present national emergency and for six months thereafter 
if applicants who qualify for Bachelor of Science Certificates 
in Elementary Education are not available. Adopted February 
25, 1942. 

The section of the certificate by-laws which forbids the issuance 
of First Grade Certificates shall be inoperative during the 
present national emergency and for six months thereafter if 
applicants who qualify for Advanced First Grade Certificates 
are not available. Adopted February 25, 1942. 

2. In 1942 a certificate which is held by a teacher in service in 
the Maryland schools and for which the full requirement has 
been met may, upon recommendation of the superintendent, be 
renewed for two years without summer school credits. If 
summer school credits are presented, the renewal will be for the 
regular four-year or six-year period. Adopted February 25, 
1942. 

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAW 57* ADOPTED MARCH 20, 1942 

1. Assistant Superintendent's Certificate 

The certificate in administration and supervision which the 
County Superintendent must hold shall be required also of an 
Assistant Superintendent whose duties are? partly or wholly 
administrative. 

2. Attendance Officer's Certificate 

Beginning August 1, 1943, graduation from a standard 
college, including courses in Education, shall be required for 
the attendance officer's certificate. At least three years of 
successful teaching experience also will be necessary. 

3. Identical Requirements for White and Colored Teachers' and 
Principals' Certificates 

Since the white and colored teachers are now on the same 
salary schedule, the requirements for the teachers' and princi- 
pals' certificates for the two races shall be identical. 

♦The Certificate Bulletin was approved as a whole hy the State Board of Education as 

By-law 57 entitled "Certification of Teachers." These proposed amendments were incorporated 

with the material of the Certificate Bulletin, a pamphlet of 24 pages which was issued in 
August 1942 as Vol. XXIII, No. 3. 



Changes in Certification Requirements 145 

4. Elementary School Principal's Certificate 

Beginning August 1, 1944, four years of standard college 
work or equivalent training, including courses in elementary 
school methods, supervision, and administration, shall be re- 
quired for the elementary school principal's certificate. Three 
years of satisfactory teaching experience also will be necessary. 

5. Recent Training Requirement 

In accordance with the recommendation of the County 
Superintendents and the action of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, the rule requiring recent credits for the issuance of a 
certificate will be waived during the present national emergen- 
cy. As a rule certificates issued under these circumstances 
shall be valid for only one year, additional credits being 
necessary for the renewal. 

6. Term of Certificate Renewal 

The maximum period for which a certificate shall be re- 
newed shall be six years, even though a lower grade of certificate 
which a • teacher may have held might have been renewable 
beyond the end of the six-year term. When a higher grade of 
certificate is issued, it will under ordinary circumstances be 
valid for three years and may be renewed for a six-year 
period without additional summer school credits if the lower 
grade of certificate could have been renewed to the same ex- 
piration date. 

7. College Entrance Credits 

A teacher in the regular service who holds a Second Grade 
Certificate may be considered to have met on the basis of this 
certificate the entrance requirement for standard college work 
toward the Bachelor's degree for the Bachelor of Science 
Certificate in Elementary Education, provided the teacher does 
satisfactory college work. 

8. College Credits 

A teacher in the regular service who holds a First Grade 
Certificate may be considered to have satisfied, on the basis of 
this certificate, two of the four years of college work necessary 
for a degree if a standard college is willing to make such an 
allowance. A teacher in the regular service who holds an 
Advanced First Grade Certificate may be considered to have 
satisfied, on the basis of this certificate, three of the four years 
necessary for a degree if a standard college is willing to make 
such an allowance. 

9. Certificate in Business Education 

The term "Business Education" shall be substituted for the 
term "Commercial Education" in the certification of high school 
teachers in this field. 

10. Repeal of By-law 55 

By-law 55, which follows, is hereby repealed, since because of 
a later by-law it has been inoperative for some time: 

"By-law 58 — Advanced First Grade Certificate Required 
No white applicant shall be admitted or readmitted into the teaching serv- 
ice in the county elementary schools of Maryland after June 1, 1935, unless 
the applicant qualifies for an Advanced First Grade Certificate." 

11. Repeal of By-law 58 

"By-law 58, which follows, is hereby repealed, since because 
of a later by-law it has been inoperative for some time; 

"By-law 58 — Advanced First Grade Certificate Required 
No colored applicant shall be admitted or readmitted into the teaching serv- 
ice in the county elementary schools of Maryland after June 1, 1938, unless 
the applicant qualifies for an Advanced First Grade Certificate." 



146 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



AMENDMENT TO SECTION 9, BY-LAW 30 

Only such graduates as rank academically in the upper four-fifths of 
the class and who make a grade of C or better in practice teaching, D 
being the passing grade, shall be issued Maryland State Teachers' Certifi- 
cates; provided, however, that graduates who do not meet these standards 
may qualify for certification by presenting credit for the satisfactory comple- 
tion of an additional year of academic and professional work with an 
average of C or its relative equivalent, and at least two-thirds of the 
courses having been approved by the Maryland State Superintendent of 
Schools. The additional work must include a course in practice teaching 
with a grade of at least C if the practice teaching requirement has not 
been met in the undergraduate years. 

teachers- community service to aid the war effort 

The services of the teachers and school officials in volunteering 
to register men for the draft, in distributing sugar ration books, 
and in training the public in civilian defense activities received 
commendation from public officials, the public and the press. 

Teachers Register Men for the Draft. The school officials 
and teachers cooperated in giving their services and use of 
school buildings in February 1942, in registering men between 
the ages of 20 and 45 under the provisions of the Selective 
Service Act. They conducted the registration of men between 
the ages of 45 and 65 in April 1942. 

Suga r Rationing. The school officials and teachers distributed 
sugar ration books for the use of the trade in April and of the 
entire population in May 1942. 

Coordination of Efforts to Secure Funds for School Buildings 
in Defense Areas. The State Department made every effort to 
see that those Maryland counties and Baltimore City in which 
population has shown large increases because of the defense pro- 
gram furnished the required information so that they might 
secure the Federal funds for school buildings to which they 
become eligible under the provisions of the Lanham Acts. This 
involved sending out questionnaires, conferences with county 
superintendents and with Federal officials, trips to Washington to 
interview officials, etc. Financing of school buildings is a county 
and not a State function, according to Maryland law. 

Public Work Reserve No. 1, or Local Programming Office — 
Coordination of Information. The State Department of Educa- 
tion cooperated with Federal officials in securing from county 
and city school officials data on school plant needs for individual 
schools, with a view to finding their relation to long range pro- 
grams of school plant needs, and with the purpose «f planning 
a list of projects for post-emergency action. 



Services of Teachers en War Effort; Planning; 
Buses and Tires 



147 



Legislative Council Studies 191*1 School Survey Report. The 
1941 legislature by resolution referred the 1941 School Survey 
Report to the Legislative Council. The State Department staff 
spent considerable time in furnishing data requested by Dr. Flack 
and his research assistant and in checking the reports they pre- 
pared. Their report "Public Schools in Maryland — 11-Grade and 
12-Grade Systems" Research Report No. 12 published in July 1942 
centered about the recommendation that the twenty counties 
having an eleven-grade system be permitted gradually to add an 
additional year and enrich their curriculum. 

The Problem of School Buses and Tires. According to the 
Office of Defense Transportation, the purchase of new buses and 
tires for buses is difficult because of the limited supply available. 
Probably only one tenth of the supply ordinarily needed can be 
obtained. First consideration must be given to chassis needed 
for war production, for transportation of war materials, and for 
the fighting forces. 

It was suggested by the Office of Defense Transportation 
representative that school children walk a greater distance before 
transportation is provided, and since the gas and rubber situa- 
tions are decreasing traffic materially this will be less hazardous 
than formerly. School buses might be routed to cover more 
territory and used for a longer period. 

A school bus can only be obtained if conditions are unusual 
and drastic and there is no solution other than provision of the 
bus. A school bus may be used only 20 or 25 hours a week, 
whereas another vehicle using the same chassis might be used 
100 to 168 hours a week. School buses should be used for 
purposes other than transportation of pupils if possible and at 
all hours. This, however, would mean that extra insurance would 
have to be taken. 

The ODT representative said that all available vehicles must 
be rationed and that school buses might be expected to last for 
ten years. 

Appeals from the decisions of local ODT officials will tend to 
standardize practices in different sections of the country. There 
are to be local appeal boards set up but meanwhile the appeal 
board in Washington may be approached. 



148 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 116 

Number of Supervisors in Maryland Counties for Varying Numbers of 
White Elementary Teachers, 1941-42 



Number of 

White 
Elementary 
Teachers 




80 to 119 
120 to 185 
186 to 235 
236 to 285 
286 to 335 
336 to 385 



Names of Counties 



Calvert, Caroline, Charles, Dorchester, Howard, Kent, 
Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, Somerset, Talbot, Worcester 
Cecil (1), Carroll, Garrett, Wicomico (1) 
Anne Arundel (2), Frederick (2), Harford(2) 

°Prince George's, t* Washington 
tJAllegany, t*Montgomery (5) 
x§t*Baltimore 



( ) The number of supervisors actually employed in October, 1941, is shown in parentheses 
for counties which employed fewer than the minimum number required by law. 
* Includes a supervisor of music, 
f Includes a supervisor of art. 

§ Includes a supervisor of physical education and health. 

° Includes a general supervisor who supervises art part-time, and another who supervises 
music part-time. 

$ Includes a supervisor of special education. 

x Includes an assistant superintendent in charge of curriculum and instruction. 



State Supervision of Elementary Schools 

In addition to the usual activities devoted to improvement 
of elementary school practice, the Assistant Superintendent in 
charge of Elementary Instruction worked with the county ele- 
mentary school supervisors and teachers in studying, applying 
and developing the curriculum materials included in the State 
Department bulletins, "Social Studies in the Elementary School" 
Primary Level and Intermediate Level which were published in 
1940-41. The 33 units in the two bulletins center around the 
theme "Living in a World of Change and Progress." 

The elementary supervisors and teachers criticized and made 
suggestions regarding a tentative cumulative record card for 
elementary pupils proposed to give teachers a better under- 
standing of each child in his social setting and to make available 
basic data so that more intelligent guidance and planning of his 
future education and work career will be possible. 

At the close of the school year Miss I. Jewell Simpson who had 
worked in the State Department to improve instruction for 
children in the elementary schools since January 1921 requested 
retirement. The program of elementary school supervision 
which was extended to the entire State under her able leadership 
and guidance has shown remarkable development. The series 



State Supervision of Elementary Schools; Retirement 149 
of Miss Simpson 



of bulletins which Miss Simpson wrote or edited for the teachers 
and supervisors give outstanding evidence of her industry, 
scholarship and practical good sense in promoting a conserva- 
tively progressive curriculum for the elementary schools. Her 
helpful contacts with the teachers, supervisors and superin- 
tendents and her excellent relations with the members of the 
State Department staff will be missed. 

Vol. No. Title 

IV 4 Silent Reading, Suggestions for Testing and 
Corrective work 

5 Arithmetic, Suggestions for Testing and 

Corrective Work 
V 1 Worth-While Teachers' Meetings 

2 Does the Helping Teacher Really Help the 

Rural Schools? (Edited) 

3 School Publicity, a Professional Opportunity 

and Obligation 
7 What good if any can come from Teacher 
Rating by the Supervisor? by the Teacher 
Herself? (Edited) 
11 Silent Reading (Second Edition) 
VI 1 Material for the Celebration of Special Days 

2 Accomplishments and Shortcomings of Mary- 

land Schools 

6 Worth- While Patrons' Meetings 
11 Workable Daily Programs for One and Two- 
Teacher Schools 

VII 1 Making the Most of Supervision (Edited) 

3 Arithmetic Goals (Second Edition) 
*A Supervisor of Rural Schools Analyzes Her 

Task (Edited) 
5 Silent Reading (Third Edition, Revised and 
Expanded) 

VIII 2 Books for the Elementary School Library 

3 A Supervisor of Town Schools Analyzes her 

Work (Edited) 

4 Goals of Achievement in English 

5 Tentative Goals in History 
IX 3 Side-Lights on the Supervision of Primary 

Grades 

X 3 Supervisory Activities in Maryland (Edited) 
XI 2 Supplement to List of Books for the Ele- 
mentary School Library 
3 Arithmetic Goals — Suggestions for Testing 
and Corrective Work (Third Edition, Re- 
vised and Expanded) 
XIII 2 Cross Section of Supervision in Garrett 
County (Edited) 
XV 1 Science in Elementary Schools 
XXII Social Studies in the Elementary School — 

Living in a World of Change and Progress 

1 Primary Level 

2 Intermediate Level 



Date 
Published 
Oct. 1922 


No. of 
Pages 
32 


Oct. 


1922 


32 


Sept. 1923 
Nov. 1923 


87 
30 


Nov. 


1923 


93 


Jan. 


1924 


14 


Mar. 
Nov. 
Nov. 


1924 

1 Q9A 

1924 


87 
144 
24 


May. 


1 Q9^ 

1925 


95 
34 


Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 


1925 
1925 
1925 


62 
13 


Jan. 


1926 


96 


Sept. 
Oct. 


1926 
1926 


133 
63 


Dec. 
Jan. 
Sept. 


1926 
1927 
1927 


20 
52 
150 


Sept. 
Oct. 


1928 
1929 


95 
50 


Mar. 


1930 


96 


Nov. 


1931 


70 


Sept. 


1933 


331 


Nov. 
Dec. 


1940 
1940 


259 
429 



•Reprint from November 1925, Educational Administration and Supervision. 



150 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



The following minute was adopted by the State Board of 
Education on September 29, 1942 : 

Dr. I. Jewell Simpson, whose resignation as Assistant State 
Superintendent of Schools has just been accepted by the Board, 
has given twenty-two years of devoted and efficient service to 
the Maryland public school system. After teaching in Carroll 
County and later serving as elementary school supervisor there, 
Dr. Simpson came to the State Department as a member of the 
newly established division of measurements on January 1, 1921, 
was made supervisor of our elementary schools on April 1, 1923, 
and became Assistant State Superintendent of Schools on 
June 1, 1925. 

Throughout the more than twenty years during which Dr. 
Simpson was a member of the State Department of Education, 
she worked with the county superintendents and supervisors 
to improve the quality of the instruction in the county elementary 
schools. In this task she was eminently successful. She won 
the confidence and enlisted the cooperation of all with whom 
she came into contact and was largely responsible for the note- 
worthy progress made in the Maryland elementary schools. 
With her, supervision was a creative activity and through 
precept and example, through the writing and publishing of 
much valuable professional material, she inspired and guided 
the supervisors and teachers in all the counties to use sanely 
progressive methods. No State school official had a larger or 
more devoted following. 

Dr. Simpson leaves the Department with the cordial good 
wishes of the State Board of Education and the hope that she 
may enjoy many years of freedom from professional demands, 
of opportunity to make her full contribution to the community, 
and of well-merited leisure. 

Supervision of High Schools 

In 1941-42, in addition to the assistant State Superintendent 
in administration, the State had three high school supervisors 
in charge of supervision in the seven central, five western and 
eleven eastern counties of Maryland, respectively. Each of 
these supervisors had in his jurisdiction over 400 teachers giving 
instruction in fields other than the special subjects for which 
there were State supervisors of home economics, occupational 
information and guidance, agriculture (part-time), industrial 
arts and education (given by the director of vocational educa- 
tion and assistant superintendent for vocational education), 
and physical education. There were approximately sixteen 
hundred county teachers who gave instruction to pupils in the 
last four years of high school work. 

Four counties (Allegany, Baltimore, Carroll and Montgomery) 
each employed a full-time high school supervisor, who aided 
the principals and teachers in their county and cooperated with 
the State supervisor of the western or central region in which 
the county was located. 



Activities of State High School Supervisors 151 



It was proposed to unify and integrate the program of high 
school administration and supervision by having the supervisors 
of special subjects attend the monthly conferences of the general 
supervisors, and participate in conferences with the individual 
county superintendent in planning the county high school pro- 
gram. In this way the needs of each department or subject 
in a high school could be weighed in the light of the needs of 
all other departments and subjects. 

The main objective in the supervisory program for the year 
was the organization of "Study Groups" in each county to 
help teachers go through the basic rethinking of the problem 
of reorganizing the high school program, necessary before actual 
curriculum building can proceed. It was planned also to have 
closer contact with the instructors in the departments of educa- 
tion in the colleges and universities of the state so that they 
could not only make direct contributions to the "study program", 
but also acquaint their students training to become teachers 
with its purposes. This program is described further in con- 
nection with the administrative and supervisory conferences 
of the county superintendents and State Department staff held 
in the summer and fall of 1941. (See pages 134-135.) 

After Pearl Harbor the program of monthly or bimonthly 
meetings of the "Study Groups" of necessity was modified so 
that the school people would not only be ready to serve national 
needs when called on but would be ready to offer their services 
and make suggestions of ways in which they could contribute. 
It became necessary to consider and make concessions regarding 
various administrative and program changes and to make school 
facilities available for wider use by community agencies. 

In each of the eleven eastern counties, the various study 
groups were organized in groups of at least five teachers and 
principals to work out units which would be suggestive of ways 
of better meeting the national emergency. It was suggested 
that this material, after editing, should probably be made 
available for wider distribution throughout the State through 
mimeographing or printing. 

At their monthly meetings, the supervisors were asked to 
consider the possibility of allowing credit toward high school 
graduation for pupils who are definitely too disabled to attend 
high school, but who are capable of taking home instruction. 
The policies of other states and the use of correspondence 
courses from recognized institutions were to be investigated. 



152 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



The further development of workshops for 1942 such as those 
held in Montgomery and Baltimore Counties and at the colleges 
in 1941, was considered with the possibility of having regional 
workshops. It was recommended that contact be established 
with the colleges of the State and that questions of costs, availa- 
bility of books and other items be considered, and that further 
discussion be had with Dr. Heaton of the National Workshop 
Committee. 

The question of development of more parent-teacher associa- 
tions in the county high schools was taken up. It was agreed 
to appoint an advisory committee to represent administrative 
and supervisory staff, a high school principal who has a very 
successful P. T. A. and one who has none, two parents with 
children in high school, and an official of the Maryland Congress 
of P. T. A.'s to take up the matter. It was decided to send a 
questionnaire to selected high school principals concerning their 
ideas, problems and accomplishments in the field of home-school 
relationships. 

Three Regional principals' conferences were held in April 1942 
at Easton, Towson and Hagerstown to discuss "Adapting the 
Schools' Program to Wartime Needs and Conditions." In the 
morning there was a panel discussion by Maryland County 
principals, county superintendents, and members of the staff of 
the State Department of Education on the following topics : 

Means of emphasizing intelligent loyalty to American democracy 

through classroom instruction and school activities 
Part-time employment of seniors — problems and policies 
A summer program for high school pupils 

The extent to which acceleration through high school is justi- 
fiable 

Implications for guidance in the present emergency 
Adaptations of the program needed for potential "drop-outs" 
Defense training for pupils still in school 
Increasing provisions for health and physical efficiency 
Preserving mental health and morale 

At the afternoon session, Dr. William G.Carr of the Educational 
Policies Commission elaborated the seven points presented in the 
bulletin "A War Policy for American Schools". 

The following State Department bulletins were made available 
to the high school principals and teachers: 

Vol. XXIII No. 1 Business Education in Maryland High Schools, 

Sept. 1941, 235 pp. 
Vol. XXIII No. 2 A Curriculum Study Guide, Maryland Looks 

Ahead in Education, Nov. 1941, 192 pp. 



High School Supervisors' Activities; Principals' Conferences; 153 
High School Equivalence Examinations 



High School Equivalence Examinations 

As a result of the enactment of Chapter 150 of the Laws of 
1941 high school equivalence examinations were given for the 
first time in October 1941 and April 1942 to persons who had 
not attended high school but wished to qualify for certificates 
equivalent to high school diplomas. 

In October 1941, 27 candidates applied for and took the ex- 
aminations, while in April 1942, 24 additional candidates ap- 
plied as well as 13 of the original 27. 

The number of examinations taken by the candidates together 
with the number who passed is shown below : 



No. of No. of 

Examinations Candidates 
Taken 



Number who Passed Following 
Number of Subjects 



October 1941 

4 13 1 2 2 8.. 

3 4 12...... 

2 8 5 1...... 

1 2 2 

April 1942 

5 1 1 

4 17 1 2 3 10 

3 10 .37 

2 3 11 

1 6 5 ...... 

One certificate was issued as a result of the October examinations and 
5 as a result of the April examinations. 

The distribution of candidates by county and subject taken 
is shown below : 

No. Who Took Subjects in Which 

County Examinations Examinations No. of Examinations Taken 

Oct. 1941 April 1942 

Allegany 5 2 

Anne Arundel 4 4 

I>orchester 1 1 

Frederick 1 

Prince George's 1 3 

Wicomico .. 1 

Baltimore City 15 23 

Special 2 

Canal Zone 1 

27 37 



Were Taken 


Oct. 


1941 


April 1942 


English I-IV 




20 


34 


General Mathematics 




5 


3 


Algebra 




1 


6 


Plane Geometry 






1 


Ancient History 




3 


3 


Medieval and Modern 


History 


1 


3 


World History 






1 


U. S. History 




lb 


11 


Problems of Democracy 




5 




General Science 




3 


8 


Biology 




1 


2 


Chemistry 




1 




Physics 




1 


2 


French 






2 


Spanish 




i 


1 


German 






1 


Woodwork 






2 


Electricity 




i 




Agriculture 






i 


Home Economics 




i 


1 


Music 




2 


5 


Art 






1 


Commercial 




27 


29 






83 


117 



154 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
Supervision of Colored Schools 

The State Supervisor of Colored Schools spends half of his 
time in the field working with the colored high school principals 
and teachers and the remainder in assisting the county super- 
visors of colored schools and in finding qualified teachers to 
nominate to the county superintendents. 

In each of nine counties a full-time colored supervisor was 
employed toward whose salary the State gave $750. In Fred- 
erick and Talbot the part-time colored supervisor also acted as 
principal of the high school, in Caroline as principal of an 
elementary school, and in Harford and Carroll as part-time 
high school teacher. In Cecil, Howard, Queen Anne's and 
Somerset, the attendance worker also acted as supervisor of 
colored schools, in Baltimore County supervision of colored 
schools was assigned to the assistant superintendent of schools, 
and in Kent it was taken over by the county superintendent. 

At the conference held in August 1941 before the opening of 
school the following elements or means or procedures in pro- 
moting the professional growth of elementary school teachers 
were discussed and evaluated with the supervisors of colored 
schools : 

Scholarship of teachers, ways of bringing consciousness of 
weakness and desire for improvement 

Professional reading to suit the needs of each individual teacher 

Visit to a classroom followed by diagnosis of needs, demonstra- 
tion (at times) and conference with the teacher 

Teachers* meetings 

Organization of subject matter on different levels 

Procedures for individualizing instruction to meet the needs of 

pupils of different ability levels 
Analysis of the act of teaching various subjects in the light of 

aims sought 

Remedial teaching following diagnosis of weaknesses 
School organization— planning the administrative schedule, in- 
struction and parent teacher activity 
Determining the needs of pupils in the light of their home and 

community background 
Making guidance function in the elementary school 
Inculcating the values of thrift for pupils and community in food, 

clothing, use of time, etc. 
Development of the aesthetic in the decorating of the classroom 
Formulation of an acceptable philosophy of Education for a 

democratic country 
The workshop or summer school work 
The knowledge, skill and character of the supervisor 

Supervisors were asked to report at the end of the year on 
the extent to which they had brought about improvement in 
teachers, pupils, buildings and grounds and communities. 

At the conference with Maryland county colored high school 
principals held in August 1941, the theme was "Strengthening 
the high school principal." The elements discussed were: 



Supervision of Colored Schools; Conferences of 155 
Attendance Workers 



A philosophy of education, inclusive of the function of the 
secondary school and all parts of the secondary school program 
and its application to his own school 

Knowledge of the needs of the community 

A working knowledge of the principles of teaching and psy- 
chology of learning 

Character in taking a stand when the welfare of the school is 
involved 

Industry and enthusiasm as an example to teachers and pupils 
Breadth of vision and social experience 

Keeping buildings and grounds in good condition and improving 
them 

Enthusiasm for attendance at summer schools or workshops 

for himself and his staff 
Vigilant responsibility for carrying out directions of county 

school officials 

Active interest in the progress of pupils and their out-of-school 
activities 

Wholesome concern for health, living conditions, ideals, atti- 
tudes, academic and professional background, quality of in- 
struction, classroom activities and out-of-school activities of 
members of the faculty 

Attitude toward the judgment of the community regarding his 
worth 

Later in the year principals were asked to report on the 
school paper, special activities, the curriculum study program, 
cooperation with the war effort, and accomplishments of the 
school as measured by the Cooperative Study of Secondary 
School Standards. 

The State Supervisor of Colored Schools visited the Bowie 
State Teachers College during the year to study the quality of 
instruction and to confer with both faculty and students. He 
also continued to advise principals and teachers to direct to 
Bowie only those high school graduates who have maintained 
high scholarship records and who have the personal qualities 
necessary for a good teacher. 

The General Education Board made available $1200 towards 
the travel expense of the State Supervisor of Colored Schools, 
but only $735 was used. 

Conference of Attendance Workers with the State Department Staff 

A number of attendance workers attended a panel discussion 
on "Training the Child for Employment" which was held on 
April 21, 1942, at the Maryland State Conference of Social Work 
at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was planned to answer questions 
of social workers concerning vocational training for children 
and to work out better methods of cooperation between school 
and welfare workers in helping problem children. 



156 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

Cases presented showed the need for mutual understanding 
and exchange of information by workers in the two departments. 
The differences between programs possible in the Baltimore 
City Schools which can arrange to take care of problem cases 
in special classes and in occupational centers and the county 
schools which have a large number of small schools scattered over 
a large area with a large load per teacher must be realized. 
However, there is an increasing number of special classes for 
elementary school pupils in the larger centers in the counties.* 
Still the prohibitive cost makes it difficult to offer a sufficient 
variety of courses to meet the needs of individual pupils in 
the small county high schools, many of which enroll under 200 
pupils.f 

In order to deal intelligently with problem children informa- 
tion is needed regarding their capacities, abilities, aptitudes, 
strengths and weaknesses. Baltimore City has facilities for 
gathering such information in its Child Guidance Clinic. Any 
principal may refer a child to the clinic for testing, diagnosis, and 
recommendations for a remedial program. On the other hand, 
the counties have only the monthly or bimonthly clinic under 
the supervision of psychiatrists on the staffs of various State 
hospitals who volunteer their services without reimbursement. 
There is not sufficient time for follow-up treatment and since the 
clinics are organized by the State Department of Health, their 
services are not necessarily available for problem cases of the 
schools. These clinics deal with adults as well as children 
referred by the health, welfare and school departments. Besides, 
there is frequently no continuity in the service of the psychia- 
trists. 

If there is a child guidance clinic once or twice a year in a 
county, instead of presenting a flood of cases, let that be the 
occasion for a careful selection and consideration of one, two or 
at most three cases of unmet needs. Have representatives from 
the county health, social welfare, school and attendance depart- 
ments and any others who are concerned present, and attempt 
to arrive at a practicable solution worked out by the group. The 
program will be helped very much if the results of vocational 
interest and aptitude tests are available. 

Social workers should take an interest in supporting school 
authorities who try to get better equipped schools, more voca- 
tional work and opportunity classes, and more attendance work- 
ers in the larger counties. The school and tax funds are limited. 
We have to do the best with what we have and work together 
to build up sentiment for better programs for school, health and 
welfare agencies. 



♦See Table 24, page 34. 



tSee Tables 72 and 73. pages 87-88. 



Conferences of Attendance Workers 



157 



The State program for educational and vocational guidance 
inaugurated in 1938 has the following program: 

1. Make available to the teacher more basic knowledge about each 
child. The proposed State permanent record card provides for 
collection of information on home background, social environment, 
personality. 

2. Help teachers to make use of and interpret data so that they 
understand their pupils better. Teachers who have a wide 
knowledge of many phases of their pupils' lives have fewer 
problems. Many teachers have known children only as consumers 
of facts the teachers give out or the pupils obtain from books. 

3. Make authentic information about further education and occupa- 
tions available to all children. This requires that the principal 
of each school allow in the schedule time for discerning teachers 
of guidance to collect and make information available to pupils 
in the light of their needs. 

4. Placement means that teachers must cooperate with State employ- 
ment services and must understand job-getting techniques. 
Pupils need to know how to apply for jobs and what character- 
istics employers look for in an employee. 

5. Follow-up of those who leave the school both before and at 
graduation. 

The following recommendations resulted from the discussion : 

1. Set up a social-service exchange in each county and in the 
State, so that all workers may learn of all agencies interested 
in each case. 

2. Have the State and each county develop a council of social 
agencies which will have regular conferences attended by 
representatives from the schools, health, welfare, school at- 
tendance work, churches, and other interested agencies for the 
purpose of finding out what each group has to offer, pooling 
resources and enlisting group thinking in solving unmet needs. 
The work might be started by studying one or two problem cases. 

3. Identify for careful follow-up those pupils who become two or 
more years retarded in first, second, and third grades since 
these pupils may become the problem cases with which the 
schools and social agencies will be concerned for years later. 

4. Have the State Conference of Social Work hold a meeting 
concurrently with the meeting of the State Teachers Association, 
usually held in October, and plan carefully for a number of 
joint meetings. 

The attendance officers met in August 1942 at the Administra- 
tion Building of the University of Maryland. The recently 
appointed supervisor of Special Education and Attendance, Mr. 
David W. Zimmerman, met with the group for the first time. 
Special mention was made of the excellent work of the following 
committees : 



158 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



1. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Behavior Problems — Mrs. 
Lola Brown — Chairman 

2. Cooperation with State Labor Department — Miss Estella Everett 
— Chairman 

3. Records and Procedures — Arthur Ramey — Chairman 

4. Cooperation with State and County Welfare Offices — Miss 
Gertrude Smith — Chairman 

5. Cooperation with State and County Health Departments — Harold 
McCann — Chairman 

Considerable benefit was derived from the series of regional 
conferences held during 1941-42, of which the minutes are on 
file in the State Department office. 

Miss Grimes' leadership as chairman of the group received 
considerable praise. 

Mrs. Brown reported on the value of diagnosing needs of 
each problem pupil, developing his abilities, adjusting the cur- 
riculum to meet his needs, and planning educational and voca- 
tional guidance for him. The earlier in school life this is done, 
the more likelihood that serious problems will not develop in 
the upper grades and high school years. 

She brought out the advantages in a better understanding of 
pupils which would result if teachers received training in 
mental hygiene. This would probably lead to more commendation 
and less condemnation. 

A number of attendance workers who discussed use of the 
new forms for reporting on and handling behavior problem 
cases claim that they aid in considering the "whole" child and 
afford a basis for conference and cooperative action by teacher, 
principal, supervisor and attendance worker. 

Miss Anita Faatz, Assistant Director of the State Department 
of Welfare, took up the following three questions which recur 
in discussion of problems confronting the School and Welfare 
Departments : 

1. The policy of the Welfare Department requires the family to 
make its own application for assistance. This general practice 
is based on the belief that a family needs to decide for it- 
self whether it requires assistance and whether it wishes to 
make application for assistance. There are eligibility require- 
ments which the family needs to understand and the family 
must also consent to having the necessary investigation made. 
Experience has shown the family is served better when it makes 
the application. The Welfare Department may visit anyone, 
however, if because of illness or physical handicap or some 
other reason he is unable to get into the office. The Attendance 
Worker and the local Welfare Department can work out ways 
in which families will be referred to the agency when the 
Attendance Worker believes that need exists for financial assist- 
ance or other service. 



Conferences of Attendance Workers 



159 



2. The granting of assistance to a family cannot be made con- 
tingent upon the child's attendance at school. The Welfare 
Department has a concern about attendance but believes that 
the enforcement of the school attendance laws in families which 
are receiving assistance as well as in those which are not is 
the responsibility of the school officials. Assistance is based 
upon need and any conditions which are set up must come out 
of the law itself. 

3. The policy of the Welfare Department requires that informa- 
tion made available to the agency shall be used only for the 
purpose for which it was given. This regulation with respect 
to the confidential nature of the records is required by both 
Federal and State law. Information can be released at the 
request of the family or with their consent. Or, the informa- 
tion may be used by the Welfare Department to give service to 
the family, when such use is related to the purpose for which 
the information was given. 

The general discussion which followed revealed that the "Rules 
and Regulations" issued by the State Department of Public 
Welfare regarding confidential records are subject to various 
interpretations in different counties. It was indicated that, 
as interpreted in some counties, this regulation may handicap 
the work of both departments, the chief concern of which is or 
should be the welfare of the pupil or parent, and may tend to 
nullify cooperation. It was pointed out that the regulations do 
not prevent the Welfare Department and the Attendance Worker 
from working together when both agencies are jointly giving 
service to a child and a family. 

The advantages of a local Council of Social Agencies for co- 
ordinating all related problems were pointed out. This council 
might well include representatives of all public or civic and 
religious groups and act as a clearing-house in setting up poli- 
cies, outlining areas of operation, and in general trying to 
determine the unmet needs of any group or case. The general 
discussion indicated the need for greater cooperation among 
State Department heads as well as among local agencies. It was 
suggested that a Coordinating Council in some communities 
might be more effective than a Council of Social Agencies. 

The following recommendations of the committee on laws 
affecting attendance of which Mr. Tilghman was chairman were 
adopted : 

1. That the respective County Superintendents and the State 
Department of Education consider (separately and jointly) 
the problem of fixing a uniform age at which a child may be 
first enrolled in the first grade of school in any county in the 
state. The recommendation of this group is that any child 
must have reached the age of six on or before the thirty-first 
(31st) day of December in order to be entered and enrolled in 
school the September of the calendar year in which his sixth 
birthday falls. 



160 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



2. It is the unanimous belief of this group that better attendance 
can be secured by haying the compulsory attendance law be- 
come effective immediately upon a child's entrance to school — 
regardless of his or her age. 

3. The superintendents be asked to consider changing the title 
"Attendance Officer" to "Supervisor of Attendance." 

In view of the fact that no revisions or adjustments in salary 
for attendance workers have been made since 1922, while the 
minimum standards for certification have been raised twice 
during this period, certain adjustments should be provided for as 
soon as expedient. It was pointed out that increased training 
for teachers and principals had resulted in increase in minimum 
salaries. Furthermore, with the widening scope of the duties 
in the field of mental hygiene and social case-work, not to men- 
tion the increasing number and complexity of records and 
reports, the position of attendance worker has increased in im- 
portance, and, therefore, justifies a salary schedule commensurate 
with its services. The relation with teachers, principals, and 
supervisors, to be effective, requires that the status of attendance 
workers, both professionally and financially, be on a par with 
that of the others. 

Mr. Ramey, the chairman of the committee on "Procedures 
for the 1942 School Census," announced that Dr. Pullen had 
suggested that no major changes in policy or procedures in 
taking the 1942 census be undertaken in view of wartime 
conditions. 

Miss Stern went over changes in the new 1942 census blanks 
recommended by the attendance workers. She stated that 1940 
or 1938 blanks may still be used if this has been planned. All 
handicapped children are to be included in the regular school 
census. 

Dr. Edward Davens, who had just been appointed Chief of 
the Bureau of Child Hygiene of the State Department of Health, 
conducted a discussion of the mental hygiene clinics set up in the 
various counties and suggested ways in which this service may 
be improved. He summarized his remarks by indorsing the 
following ideas expressed by Dr. George Preston, Commissioner 
of Mental Hygiene : 

"Mental Hygiene is an essential part of any public health pro- 
gram and any plan which breaks the connection between mental 
hygiene and public health is moving in the wrong direction. The 
clinic organization therefore should center around the Bureau of 
Child Hygiene as far as State organization is concerned and 
around the County Health Officer, as far as county work is 
concerned. The next step is to divide this very inclusive but 
rather poorly carried out mental hygiene program into two 
essential aspects, one strictly preventive and the other therapeutic. 



Conferences of Attendance Workers 



161 



"For the present it seems to me that it would be necessary 
for us to continue our volunteer clinics as far as we are able 
and to continue to use as much service as possible from the 
staffs of the various State hospitals. The first step in further 
development might be a coordinating psychiatrist trained in child 
guidance programs, who might serve part-time in a State 
Hospital and devote the rest of his time to the development of 
a clinic program on a State-wide basis. 

"All work in clinics is primarily psychiatric therapy and only 
incidentally preventive mental hygiene. I believe, however, that 
a strictly preventive mental hygiene program could be built up, 
within the nursing service of the State Department of Health. 

"There are a certain number of specific risks to which practi- 
cally all children are exposed and the State Department of 
Health is at present engaged in immunizing children against 
some of these risks and in organizing the community so that 
other risks do not arise. Diphtheria and tuberculosis will 
serve as two examples. There are, however, a fair number 
of almost universally occurring threats to mental health which 
at the present time are thought of as lying outside the field of 
public health. 

"If I try to summarize this plan, I would picture the Depart- 
ment of Education studying children so as to find out what 
kind of children they were teaching, doing as well as they could, 
and then referring their difficult cases to a treatment service. 
I would picture the State Department of Health carrying on a 
preventive program such as outlined above and referring their 
treatment cases to a treatment agency. I would picture the 
treatment agency as probably belonging ultimately to the Board 
of Mental Hygiene because it is now concerned with the ad- 
ministration of psychiatric treatment and could, without a great 
deal of difficulty, be expanded to provide adequate treatment 
for children. Ideally, the Mental Hygiene Society should add 
to this program the impetus which would see that both simple 
psychiatry and mental hygiene become essential parts of the 
teaching program in every teachers' college, university, and 
high school in the State." 

Miss Grimes led the discussion on the proposal that each 
attendance worker submit an annual comprehensive report of 
attendance work. The need for some type of report was noted, 
since there are many areas of our work about which we have 
no definite data for presentation to local and state authorities; 
e.g., the extent and nature of delinquency; the number and 
disposition of cases; and the specific problems and accomplish- 
ments of our work. 

Several registered opposition to the making of another sta- 
tistical report on the ground that the present annual report on 
enrollment, attendance and promotions is sufficient. The type 
of report desired, however, is not another statistical report, 
but a thoughtful analysis of the problem cases that have been 
dealt with during the year, the means used to bring about ad- 
justments for the type of cases which did not respond to treat- 



162 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



ment and the reasons, and suggestions of ways of meeting un- 
met needs. In the absence of a common understanding as to 
the nature and purpose of the type of report desired, it was recom- 
mended that the State Department and the County Superin- 
tendents were the proper authorities to request such a report, 
if and when needed, as well as the content-material to be included. 

However, in closing this discussion definite suggestion was 
made that each worker evaluate his work in terms of his yearly 
objectives set up in advance. In so doing the need may arise 
for some type of activity report on which to base later policies. 
Some members of the group are making such reports. 

In a general discussion of the effect of the war on attendance 
procedures, Miss Chell presented the problems which arise when 
parents and older children are employed during the day and take 
no responsibility for getting the children ready for school or 
for preparing their meals. The school alone can not handle 
the situation. It is a general one demanding the immediate 
consideration of the industries, the government, and the public. 
The schools, however, must or may take the initiative in col- 
lecting the facts and bringing the nature and seriousness of the 
problem before the groups concerned. 

The matter of gas and tire rationing as it affects attendance 
work, particularly the taking of the biennial census, was also 
brought up. This year, it was felt, a house-to-house canvass will 
be impossible. The alternative suggested was the use of older 
high school pupils or the oldest member of the family to cover 
bus routes and mapped areas under careful teacher direction. 

Action of State Board of Education on Death of Dr. Tall and Dr. Finney 

The State Board of Education on March 20, 1942 adopted the 
following minute: 

In the death of Dr. Lida Lee Tall, Maryland has lost an out- 
standing educational leader and a valuable public-spirited 
citizen. Starting as critic and instructor in the Baltimore 
Teachers' Training School, serving later in Baltimore County 
as Assistant Superintendent, Dr. Tall became principal of the 
State Normal School at Towson in 1920, and when in 1934, 
under her administration, it became a four-year Teachers Col- 
lege, she continued as its president until she retired in 1938. 
Dr. Tall thus had a large part in the professional preparation 
of the elementary school teachers of Maryland and in the 
marked increase in the State standards for elementary school 
instruction. As a teacher and an administrator, Dr. Tall has 
left a lasting impression on the State school system. Her 
achievements in her profession brought her national recognition. 



Resolutions of State Board of Education re Dr. Tall 163 
and Dr. Finney 



Dr. Tall did not confine her interests to education. She 
took an active part in various social and civic enterprises and 
for some years before her death gave her time and effort un- 
stintedly to the presidency of the Children's Aid Society. Music, 
art, literature, and extensive travel enriched her personality. 
She was equally gracious to all and many are happier for 
having known her. Her memory will remain a choice possession 
not only for her large circle of friends but for thousands of 
former students, associates, and acquaintances throughout the 
State. 

On the occasion of Dr. Tail's death, as at the time she re- 
tired, the State Board wishes to express its appreciation of 
the significant and devoted service Dr. Tall has rendered to 
public education in Maryland. 

The State Board on March 20, 1942 granted permission to 
name the elementary school at the State Teachers College at 
Towson the Lida Lee Tall School. 

The following minute was adopted by the State Board of 
Education on September 29, 1942 : 

The members of the State Board of Education wish to ex- 
press individually and collectively their deep sense of loss in 
the death of Dr. J. M. T. Finney, which took place on May 30, 
1942. 

Dr. Finney was appointed to the State Board of Education 
in 1920 at a critical period in the administration of the State 
school system, and he immediately took a leading part in the 
deliberations of the Board. He was at once elected vice- 
president, after withdrawing his name from nomination as 
president in favor of Dr. Henry M. Fitzhugh. At an early 
meeting of the Board Dr. Finney nominated Dr. Albert S. Cook 
as State Superintendent, a step the wisdom of which was amply 
demonstrated in the remarkable progress the Maryland schools 
made during Dr. Cook's long administration. Though living 
an especially full life as one of the foremost surgeons in the 
United States and leading or participating in many community 
activities. Dr. Finney attended almost every meeting of the State 
Board of Education during more than two decades and followed 
with keen interest the multifarious problems which arose. He 
fully realized the importance of public education in a democracy 
and lent his support to every effort to enrich the contribution 
of the public schools. He helped to shape the educational policies 
of the State in such a way that standards for the preparation 
of teachers rose sharply, the normal schools became four-year 
teachers colleges, supervision reached every school, and the 
gradual but steady consolidation of schools and the furnishing of 
public transportation to pupils gave greatly improved educa- 
tional opportunities to children throughout the State. 

In the death of Dr. Finney Maryland has lost one of her 
most distinguished and public-spirited citizens and the State 
Board of Education one of its most valued members. Those 
who have been privileged to serve with Dr. Finney will long- 
remember him as one whose words and actions, personal charm 
and delightful sense of humor won universal admiration and 
affection. 



164 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Graduates of State Teachers Colleges and Their Placement 



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166 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 119 — Enrollment at Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges 



Fall of 


Towson 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Total 
White Students 


Bowie 


Coppin 


City 


County 


County 


State 


1920 




184 


57 




241 


241 




124 


1921 




397 


101 




498 


498 




185 


1922 




506 


134 




640 


640 




225 


1923 




569 


125 




694 


694 




225 


1924 


'518 


602 


149 




751 


1,269 


MJ 


91 1 
all 


1925 


411 


513 


197 


107 


817 


1,228 


oD 


1 at 


1926 


275 


475 


201 


158 


834 


1,109 


81 


117 


1927 


268 


402 


192 


170 


764 


1,032 


104 


121 


1928 


315 


359 


178 


186 


723 


1,038 


128 


99 


1929 


346 


368 


173 


174 


715 


1,061 


120 


125 


1930 


298 


348 


161 


165 


674 


972 


109 


171 


1931 


348 


306 


111 


127 


544 


892 


106 


145 


1932 


289 


257 


136 


101 


494 


783 


122 


127 


1933 


230 


230 


116 


114 


460 


690 


99 


282 


1934 


178 


193 


124 


108 


425 


603 


100 


111 


1935 


193 


147 


137 


185 


469 


662 


96 


112 


1936 


284 


175 


131 


201 


507 


791 


116 


141 


1937 


290 


186 


170 


210 


566 


856 


138 


163 


1938 


340 


222 


212 


239 


673 


1,013 


177 


168 


1939 


322 


249 


223 


273 


745 


1,067 


131 


164 


1940 


277 


234 


221 


221 


676 


953 


150 


156 


1941 


210 


209 


195 


209 


613 


823 


155 


161 


1942 


172 


162 


145 


159 


466 


638 


120 


154 



TABLE 120 — Distribution of Enrollment in Maryland State Teachers 
Colleges and Coppin Teachers College by Class, Fall of 1942 





Towson 


Frost- 
burg 


Salis- 
bury 


Total 
White Students 


Bowie 


Coppin 


City 


County 


County 


State 


Freshman 


47 


30 


32 


61 


123 


170 


24 


40 




34 


36 


34 


39 


109 


142 


29 


45 




46 


44 


42 


24 


110 


157 


41 


38 




45 


§°52 


§36 


§31 


119 


164 


23 


31 


Total 


172 


°162 


*145 


fl59 


*|466 


°*t638 


tll9 


154 


Resident Students 


11 


110 


54 


64 


228 


239 


117 




Day Students 


161 


38 


65 


63 


197 


359 


2 


154 


Cadets 




14 


26 


32 


72 


72 






Elementary School .... 


50 


177 


169 


84 


430 


480 


131 


711 



* Includes one special student. ° Includes one out-of-state student, 

t Includes four special students. $ Includes two special students. 

§ Includes Cadets. 

By-Law 50 providing that no student shall be admitted to the 
freshman class in a Maryland State Teachers College who will 
not be sixteen years of age by the following December 31 was 
rescinded by the State Board of Education, August 27, 1941. 

The State Board of Education on February 25, 1942, approved 
the following policies applying to the State Teachers Colleges 
for white students : 

The acceleration of the courses at the three State Teachers 
Colleges for white students. 

The summer school students in the State Teachers Colleges 
shall be charged fees proportionate to those paid in the winter 
session. Out-of-State students will pay a surcharge. 



Enrollment at State Teachers Colleges 



167 



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168 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 122 



1942 Entrants at White Teachers Colleges 



State 
Teachers 
College 


Total 
Num- 
ber 


Percent Having Had Various High 
School Courses 


Percent From High 
Middle, and Lower 
Third of Class 


Aca- 
demic 


Gen- 
eral 


Com- 
mercial 


Voca- 
tional 


Unclass- 
ified 


High 


Middle 


Low 


Unclass- 
ified 




77 




















City 


47 


93^6 




i'.3 


2.1 




78!7 


19.2 


2.1 




County 


30 


77.7 


23.3 








56.7 


30.0 


13.3 




Frostburg 


32 


78.1 


9.4 


6.3 


3.1 


3.1 


62.5 


21.9 


9.4 


6.2 


Salisbury 


61 


62.3 


31.1 


6.6 






41.0 


42.6 


16.4 





TABLE 123 

Freshmen Who Entered White Maryland Teachers Colleges in September, 
1941, Who Withdrew at the Request of the School, or Voluntarily, Before 

September, 1942 





Towson 












Frostburg 


Salisbury 




City 


County 








39 


47 


48 


94 




2 


4 


2 


27 






3 










3 


13' ' 


25' ' 


Withdrawals to Enter Armed Services 


2 ' 






3 


Percent* Withdrawn at Request of School 




7.0 






Percent* of Voluntary Withdrawals 




7.0 


28!3 


37!3 


Percent* Withdrawn to Enter Armed Services 


5*4 






4.5 


Percent* of Total Withdrawals 


5.4 


14.0 


28.3 


41.8 



♦Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment or death. 



TABLE 124 



Faculty and Staff at Maryland State Teachers Colleges 1941-1942 





Towson 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


Coppin 




1 


1 


1 


1 


<l 


Instructors 


28 


dl2 


el2 


f9 




Library 


4 


2 


3 


2 




Campus Elementary School 


9 


5 


4 


4 


17 










il2 






a6 




h7 


jio 


City 


bl9 










8 


2 


2 


1 


1 




c4 


1 


1 


1 





a In three schools in Baltimore County, 
b In eleven schools in Baltimore City. 

c Includes dietician, resident physician, resident nurse and dormitory clerk. 

d Includes the director of student training who acts as principal of the elementary school 
and two teachers who instruct in the elementary school. 

e Includes the director of student training who acts as the principal of the elementary 
school, but excludes social director who acts as teacher. 

f Includes the director of student training who acts as principal of elementary school, 
but excludes social director. 

g Classified as a principal. Also principal of elementary school. 

h Includes three in one school in Somerset and four in three schools in Wicomico. 

i Includes five schools in Prince George's and two schools in Anne Arundel. 

j In eight schools. 



Entrants, Withdrawals, Faculty and Costs, State 169 
Teachers Colleges 

TABLE 125 

Total and Per Regular Student Costs at State Teachers Colleges, 1929 to 1942 



Year 



Total 
Current 
Expenses 



Fees 
Paid 
by 
Students 



Cost 

to 
State 



College 
Enrollment 



Total 



Percent 
Resident 



Percent 
Elemen- 
tary is of 
College 
Enroll- 
ment 



Average Annual 
Cost per College 
Student 





in 


to 


Total 


Fees 


State 



Towsom 



1929 


$301,590 


$64,551 


$237,039 


650 


51 


39 


$464 


a^99 


$365 


1930 


314,699 


64,660 


250,039 


604 


49 


43 


521 


al07 


414 


1931 


311,674 


61,663 


250,011 


561 


51 


42 


556 


allO 


446 


1932 


277,642 


57,201 


220,441 


582 


43 


46 


477 


a98 


379 


1933 


261,686 


42,182 


219,504 


503 


36 


53 


520 


a84 


436 


1934 


210,135 


79,108 


131,027 


450 


36 


54 


487 


bl96 


291 


1935 


192,873 


58,317 


134,556 


354 


31 


71 


545 


bl65 


380 


1936 


179,751 


50,286 


129,465 


330 


25 


75 


545 


bl53 


392 


1937 


184,263 


65,395 


118,868 


438 


23 


54 


420 


bl48 


272 


1938 


217,359 


70,312 


147,047 


455 


26 


54 


478 


bl55 


323 


1939 


218,699 


81 , 737 


136,962 


531 


25 


47 


412 


bl54 


258 


1940 


224,929 


88,414 


136,515 


535 


31 


46 


420 


bl65 


255 


1941 


219,112 


82,597 


136,515 


482 


34 


49 


455 


bl71 


284 


1942 


222,487 


h74,468 


148,019 


403 


37 


58 


553 


hbl85 


368 



Frostburo 



1929 


$73,584 


$14,566 


$59,018 


178 


44 


65 


$413 


a -82 


$331 


1930 


76,581 


13,221 


63,360 


161 


43 


65 


476 


a82 


394 


1931 


77,554 


14,290 


63,264 


154 


51 


80 


504 


a93 


411 


1932 


75,575 


9,809 


65,766 


113 


50 


166 


669 


a87 


582 


1933 


71,254 


9,175 


62,079 


121 


41 


175 


589 


a76 


513 


1934 


61,359 


21 , 545 


39,814 


115 


49 


171 


533 


bl87 


346 


1935 


56,780 


23,230 


33 , 550 


117 


49 


171 


485 


bl99 


286 


1936 


59,558 


22,415 


37,143 


130 


42 


161 


459 


bl73 


286 


1937 


64,087 


23,444 


40,643 


131 


45 


153 


489 


bl79 


310 


1938 


77,755 


29,625 


48,130 


167 


44 


123 


466 


bl78 


288 


1939 


82,025 


33,895 


48,130 


204 


39 


93 


402 


bl66 


236 


1940 


80,919 


37,869 


43,050 


214 


46 


86 


378 


bl77 


201 


1941 


82,220 


36,535 


45,685 


210 


41 


85 


392 


bl74 


218 


1942 


83,889 


b.33,398 


50,491 


186 


41 


95 


451 


hbl79 


272 



Salisbury 



1929 


$86,575 


$28,437 


$58,138 


180 


80 


35 


$481 


a"158 


$323 


1930 


98,930 


27,456 


71,474 


168 


88 


53 


589 


al63 


426 


1931 


98,359 


28,005 


70,354 


160 


90 


59 


615 


al75 


440 


1932 


88,197 


20,475 


67,722 


124 


85 


79 


711 


al65 


546 


1933 


71,346 


12,575 


58,771 


98 


72 


108 


728 


al28 


600 


1934 


66,144 


24,267 


41,877 


114 


71 


102 


580 


b213 


367 


1935 


59,435 


20,706 


38,729 


109 


40 


121 


545 


b252 


293 


1936 


67,672 


32,289 


35,383 


184 


41 


69 


384 


bl92 


192 


1937 


70,185 


34,801 


35,384 


200 


40 


61 


351 


bl74 


177 


1938 


87,595 


36,608 


50,987 


210 


39 


58 


417 


bl74 


243 


1939 


89,119 


41,787 


47,332 


228 


49 


52 


391 


bl83 


208 


1940 


93,633 


48,746 


44,887 


268 


51 


49 


350 


b!82 


168 


1941 


84,281 


40,444 


43,837 


211 


55 


57 


430 


bl92 


208 


1942 


92,625 


b.37,588 


55,037 


194 


47 


59 


478 


hbl94 


284 



Bowie 



1929 


$50,469 


$14,220 


$36,249 


128 


95 


24 


$394 


C$111 


$283 


1930 


57,004 


14,799 


42,205 


108 


97 


61 


528 


dl37 


391 


1931 


55,917 


13,717 


42,200 


94 


98 


78 


595 


dl46 


449 


1932 


47,790 


13,600 


34,190 


97 


97 


71 


492 


dl40 


352 


1933 


55,064 


15,449 


39,615 


108 


98 


60 


510 


dl43 


367 


1934 


39,082 


13,385 


25,697 


89 


97 


65 


439 


el 50 


289 


1935 


46,817 


14,723 


32,094 


87 


98 


68 


538 


el69 


369 


1936 


42,965 


13,571 


29,394 


86 


97 


79 


500 


el 58 


342 


1937 


47,601 


17,673 


29,928 


111 


92 


59 


429 


el 59 


270 


1938 


59,589 


19,275 


40,314 


128 


92 


75 


466 


el51 


315 


1939 


62,911 


19,069 


43,841 


158 


97 


65 


399 


fl21 


278 


1940 


57,695 


17,098 


40,597 


121 


98 


93 


477 


gl41 


336 


1941 


60,295 


19,270 


41,025 


140 


99 


86 


431 


gl38 


293 


1942 


63,134 


19,359 


43,775 


144 


98 


85 


439 


gl35 


304 



a Day students paid $20, women residents $200, and men boarders $72. 

b Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 

c Resident students paid $115, day students $7. 

d Resident students paid $120, day students $9. Service rendered by students, 
e Resident students paid $164, day students $19. 

f Resident students paid $110, day students $15. Service rendered by students. 
g Resident students paid $140, day students $20. 

h Includes excess of receipts over expenditures of summer school students transferred 
to offset deficit in actual under estimated student fees. 



170 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 126— Expenditures and Receipts at State Teachers Colleges from 
Sept. 1, 1941 to Aug. 31, 1942 



Expenditures 







Expenditures for Instruction 


Expenditures for Dormitory 






c 






c 


c 


c 




College 


Total 


o 

a 
it 


"S3 


c 

35 _ 


n, 

ortati 


tratic 


N 

? c a 








Adminis 


Salaries 
Instruc 


■5 S 


- - z. 

ci.E C 

jtf 


Adminis 


Operatic 
Mainte 
Transpi 
Health 


Food 


Towson 


$222,487 


$19,495 


$103,850 


$6,860 


$37,491 


$3,979 


$32,371 


$18,441 


Frostburg 


83,889 


9,070 


43.090 


5,714 


7,805 


1,800 


9,494 


6,916 


Salisbury 


92,625 


7,485 


41,340 


4,653 


8,109 


4,759 


18,284 


7,995 


Total White .... 


$399,001 


$36,050 


$188,280 


$17,227 


$53,405 


$10,538 


$60,149 


$33,352 


Bowie 


63,134 


2,419 


21,321 


3,323 


8,390 


1,743 


12,872 


13,066 



Receipts 



College 


Average 
Enrollment in 


Receipts for 
Instruction from 


Average 


Receipts for 
Dormitory from 


College 


Ele- 
mentary 
School 


Stu- 
dents 


Excess 
Summer 

School 
Receipts 


State 


Resi- 
dent 
Enroll- 
ment 


Stu- 
dents 


Excess 
Summer 

School 
Receipts 


State 


Towson 


403 
186 
194 


233 $40,855 
176 18,402 
115 18,640 


$1,256 
681 
2,432 


$125,585 
46 , 596 
40,515 


150 
76 
92 


$31,417 
13,805 
15,643 


$940 
510 
873 


$22,434 
3,895 
14,522 


Frostburg . . . 
Salisbury. . . . 

Total White 
Bowie 


783 
144 


524 '$77,897 
123 | 1,930 


$4,369 


$212,696 
33,523 


318 
141 


$60,865 
17,429 


$2,323 


$40,851 
10,252 





° Because students' fees fell below estimates the excess of summer school fees over 
expenditures was transferred to offset the deficits in actual under estimated students' fees. 



TABLE 127 



National Youth Administration Student Aid, 1941-42 





N. Y. A. 


Approved 


Aid 


College 


Student 


Appli- 


per 




Aid 


cations 


Student 


State Teachers College, Towson 


81 


$4,796.55 


$59.21 


State Teachers College, Frostburg 


70 


4,385.00 


62.64 




75 


4,905.21 


65.40 


State Teachers College, Bowie 


65 


2,436.00 


37.48 




31 


1,346.00 


43.42 



Expenditures, Receipts and Per Student Costs, 
State Teachers Colleges 



171 



CHART 27 



1941-42 COST PER TEACHERS COLLEGE STUDENT 



TOTAL COST OF INSTRUCTION PER STUDENT 



State 



Average 



Teachers 
College 
at 


Number of 
College Elem. 
Students Pupilst 


Total 
Cost 


Towson 


403 


233 


$416 | 


Frostburg 


186 


176 


353 | 


Salisbury 


194 


115 


317 | 



Total Cost I 



*M2 



Paid by 

State Kflfl Student 

□ Excess fees 
Sum. Sch. Pups. 



Bowie 



144 



123 



246 



State 
Teachers 



Resident 
Students 



College 


Average 


♦per 


Total 


at 


Number 


Cent 


Cost 


Towson 


150 


37 


#781 1 


Salisbury 


92 


47 


154 | 


Frostburg 


76 


41 


593 | 



TOTAL COST PER RESIDENT STUDENT 

HD22 Total cost 



Paid by 
State (22]student 

I I Excess fees 
1 'Sum. Sch. Pups . 



*4u \/////////m///////m 



v///i/////%y/////m 



Bowie 



141 



98 



443 



f Not considered in calculating cost per college student. Elementary pupils were follow- 
ing percent of college enrollment in 1942 : Towson, 58 ; Frostburg, 95 ; Salisbury, 59 ; Bowie, 85. 

* Percent that resident students were of total college enrollment. 
Because students' fees fell below estimates, the excess of summer school fees over ex- 
penditures was transferred to offset the deficits at Towson, Frostburg and Salisbury. 
See white blocks above. 



TABLE 128— Inventories at State Teachers Colleges and State Department 
of Education, September, 1942 



School or Department 


Land and 
Improvements 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 


Towson State Teachers College 
Frostburg State Teachers College.. 
Salisbury State Teachers College . . 

Bowie State Teachers College 

*State Department of Education . . 

Vocational Rehabilitation Dept 


$127,970 
80,590 
17,872 
15,246 


$1,306,500 
354,718 
700,046 
437,064 


$214,237 
44 , 842 
95,056 
73,284 
19,880 
6,012 
1,236 


$1,648,707 
480,150 
812,974 
525,594 
19,880 
6,012 
1,236 



* Includes Vocational Education, Physical Education and Bureau of Educational 
Measurements. 



172 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 129 

Contributions by Teachers to the Annuity Savings Fund of the Teachers' 
Retirement System of the State of Maryland for the Year Ended July 31, 
1942; Number and Percent of October, 1942, County Teaching Staff Who 
Are Members in Active Service 







Members 




Amount 


in Active Service 




Contributed 


October 


, 1942 


County or Institution 


Year Ending 








July 31, 1942 








Number 


Percent 


County: 










$33,013.35 


452 


92.2 




22,554.25 


358 


94.0 




46,269.61 


595 


91.4 


Calvert 


3,833.40 


66 


95.7 




6,557.29 


102 


94 4 




14,188.52 


212 


95^5 




10,276.94 


154 


93.9 




6,592.22 


95 


77.9 




9,194.98 


146 


91 '.& 




19,636.43 


277 


94 1 9 




9,602.39 


148 


94*3 




13,207.29 


216 


91 9 




6 , 526 . 93 


113 


95!8 




5,372.36 


77 


92.8 




38,846.78 


499 


94.0 


Queen Anne's 


30,716.72 


534 


89.0 


6,103.54 


92 


98.9 




4,677.90 


70 


84.3 


Somerset 


6 856 00 


115 


96.6 




6 ',415! 28 


98 


94.2 


Washington 


26,919.79 


369 


93.2 




1 n csfl i a 

1U , OOO . 14 


167 


89.3 




7,527.65 


117 


95.9 


Total Counties 


$345,777.76 


5,072 


92.8 


Teachers Colleges: 










6,365.57 


47 


92.2 




2,425.42 


19 


86.4 




2,596.22 


22 


100.0 




1,259.75 


18 


94.7 


Department: 










4,485.70 


30 


100.0 




466.81 


5 


100.0 


Retirement 


359.34 


3 


100.0 




421.86 


6 


100.0 


Other Schools: 








Maryland Training School for Boys 


2,134.73 


18 




Montrose School for Girls 


802.58 


6 




Maryland Training School for Colored Girls 


390.80 


4 




Rosewood State Training School 


1,346.10 


13 




Maryland School for the Deaf 


2,026.17 


24 




Total School and Departments 


$25,081.05 


215 




Grand Total 


$370,858.81 


5,287 





Contributions and Membership, Retirement System; 
Services of Maryland Public Library Commission 



173 



TABLE 130 

Services of Maryland Public Library Commission to Maryland County 
Schools for White Pupils by Year 





Total Number 
Supplied 


Traveling Libraries 
(30-35 Books in Each) 


Package Libraries 
(1-12 Books in Each) 


Year 
Ending June 30 








Supplied to 




Supplied to 




Volumes 


Pictures 


No. 


Schools 


Teachers 


No. 


Schools 


Teachers 



White Elementary Schools 



12,022 
9,799 

16,606 
8,609 
8,675 
7,029 
8,255 
5,577 
4,258 
4,249 
3,751 
2,894 



569 
1,814 
574 



299 


157 


196 


393 


89 


124 


275 


165 


206 


266 


79 


84 


419 


182 


275 


334 


87 


112 


225 


96 


128 


210 


91 


107 


219 


81 


144 


247 


77 


88 


184 


66 


80 


150 


46 


56 


207 


44 


52 


237 


56 


73 


133 


39 


43 


199 


47 


52 


92 


26 


31 


279 


66 


82 


86 


22 


25 


375 


64 


75 


69 


17 


21 


353 


56 


75 


62 


10 


12 


207 


44 


56 



White Hioh Schools 



3,236 
4,562 
6,266 
4,148 
6,172 
3,723 
3,082 
3,937 
3,208 
5,076 
5,432 
3,791 



323 
125 
180 



77 


31 


47 


125 


27 


32 


105 


31 


48 


189 


49 


54 


148 


35 


45 


331 


47 


57 


91 


35 


39 


324 


37 


63 


148 


42 


79 


338 


48 


67 


95 


31 


46 


134 


24 


29 


61 


18 


21 


281 


37 


48 


54 


16 


17 


405 


35 


37 


51 


11 


11 


284 


26 


28 


37 


13 


13 


809 


37 


46 


35 


13 


13 


828 


43 


48 


32 


12 


12 


679 


35 


35 



174 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



to (MHrsnaN • .-h th ,-1 eo m -co so -nhnhco 



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Services of Library Commission; Rosenwald Fund Libraries 175 



TABLE 132 



Services of Maryland Public Library Advisory Commission to the County 
Colored Schools, 1941-1942 



County 


Total Number 
Supplied 


Traveling Libraries 
(30 to 35 Books in Each) 


Package Libraries 
(1 to 12 Books in Each) 


Number 


Supplied to 


Number 


Supplied to 


Volumes 


Pictures 


Schools Teachers 


Schools Teachers 



Colored Elementary Schools 



Total 


206 


57 


1 


l 


l 


36 


6 


7 


Calvert 


53 










7 


1 


1 




10 










5 


1 


2 




94 




i 


i 


i 


9 


1 


1 


Prince George's 


28 


40 








7 


2 


2 


Wicomico 


21 


17 








8 


1 


1 


Colored High Schools 


Total 


123 


22 




l 


l 


43 


7 


7 




3 
















Calvert 


14 










3 


1 






7 


is 








4 


1 




Howard 


37 




i 


i 


i 


1 


1 




Kent 


33 


1 








17 


1 






6 










6 


1 




Wicomico 


23 










11 


1 





There are public libraries available to county colored children and adults in the high 
school at Catonsville, Baltimore County, and in Cambridge in Dorchester County. 



TABLE 133 



County Schools for Colored Pupils Which Received Libraries Through Aid 
from the Rosenwald Fund, 1941-1942 



County and School 


Value 
of 

Library 


County and School 


Value 
of 

Library 


County and School 


Value 
of 

Library 


Anne Arundel 

Laurel Heights 

Stanton 


$36 
15 
36 
15 
15 


Montgomery 
Sellman 


$30 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 


Montgomery, (con't): 
Quince Orchard .... 
Norbeck 


$15; 

15. 

15. 

15, 

$94 
$188 


Carroll; Johnson ville . . . . 

Frederick; Lincoln 

Kent; Georgetown 


Washington 

Germantown 

Clarksburg 

Smithsville 


Poolesville 

Total Number of 

Libraries Aided .... 
Rosenwald 

County Contribution 



* Excludes cost of transportation of books paid by the Rosenwald Fund as well as 
one-third of the value of each library supplied. 



176 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 134 



Estimated Cost of Health Service to Public School Children in Maryland 
Counties for Year Ending September 30, 1942 



County 


Number of 


Es- 
timated 
Budget 
Affecting 
Puolic 
School 
Children 


Percent from 


Hea 
Offi< 

Full 
Time 


1th 
:ers 

Part 
Time 


Nurses 


Clerks 


*Other 


State 


Federal 
Aid 


County 
Levy 


All Counties .... 


26 


30 


132 


48 


136 


*t338,784 


38.6 


27.1 


34.3 


Allegany 


2 




10 


4 


12 


35,506 


33.4 


16.9 


49.7 


Anne Arundel . . . 


2 




20 


7 


14 


32,051 


19.9 


68.4 


11.7 


Baltimore 


2 




15 


5 


7 


31,725 


22.6 


17.2 


60.2 


Calvert 






2 


1 


4 


6,648 


48.5 


30.2 


21.3 


Caroline 






3 


1 


2 


7,651 


61.0 


14.8 


24.2 


Carroll 






2 


1 


2 


7,056 


45.9 


33.5 


20.6 


Cecil 






2 


1 


2 


9,919 


40.7 


34.1 


25.2 


Charles 






3 


1 


5 


12,501 


32.0 


55.1 


12.9 


Dorchester 






4 


2 


9 


10,990 


67.3 


14.9 


17.8 


Frederick 






5 


1 


6 


18,600 


34.8 


39.0 


26.2 


Garrett 






6 


1 


6 


10,307 


56.5 


19.8 


23.7 


Harford 






3 


2 


3 


8,206 


33.8 


30.7 


35. 5 


Howard 






2 




2 


7,235 


48.4 


18.9 


32.7 


Kent 






4 


i 


4 


10,986 


54.1 


21.3 


24.6 


Montgomery .... 






13 


4 


13 


27,780 


29.7 


12.8 


57.5 


Prince George's. 






8 


3 


8 


23,429 


25.4 


24.6 


50.0 


Queen Anne's . . . 






4 


2 


4 


6,420 


58.4 


21.8 


19.8 


St. Mary's 






2 


1 


5 


6,414 


62.8 


25. 5 


11. 7 


Somerset 






3 


1 


3 


7,523 


52.6 


12.7 


34.7 


Talbot 






3 


1 


5 


9,195 


42.5 


37.2 


20.3 








4 


2 


9 


20,855 


44.9 


18.9 


36.2 


Wicomico 






8 


2 


6 


16,123 


59.0 


17.0 


24.0 


Worcester 






6 


4 


5 


11,664 


48.2 


18.1 


33.7 



* Includes 34 sanitary inspectors ; bacteriologists, technicians, laboratory helpers in 
branch bacteriological laboratories ; physicians and janitors in venereal disease clinics. 

t Includes one-half of State funds for general purposes ($188,252.92), services for 
crippled children ($44,209.37), and branch laboratories ($29,170.12) ; one-half of federal funds 
for U. S. Public Health Service Title VI ($75,784.40), services for crippled children ($84,524.21) 
and branch laboratories ($23,421.32) ; one-half of county expenditures from which Board of 
Education contributions have been deducted ($232,206.51). Expenditures for venereal disease 
control ($42,350.06), maternal and child health ($109,051.91) and contributions paid by other 
agencies ($38,017.48) have been excluded. 



Aid of 



State 



and County Health Offices to School Children 177 



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IS 



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178 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 136 



Report of School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of the 
Maryland State Department of Health, August 1, 1941 to July 31, 1942 



County 


Number of 
Clinicians 


Time 
Given 
to 

Service* 


Number of 
Children 


Number of 


Examined 
by 
Dentists 


Treated 


Fillings 
Inserted 


Teeth 
Extracted 


Clean- 
ings 


Treat- 
ments 


Total 
Opera- 
tions 


Total 


29 




35,717 


9,401 


23,210 


13,921 


3,007 


6,319 


46,457 




1 


Full 


2,495 


1,495 


866 


3,887 


381 


1,832 


6,966 


Anne Arundel .... 


5 


Part 


2,783 


373 


1,071 


343 


356 


162 


1,932 


Baltimore 


7 


Part 


6,418 


1,200 


3,972 


1,596 


632 


1,013 


7,213 


Calvert 


1 


Part 


435 


296 


575 


357 


2 


3 


937 


Carroll 


1 


Half 


2,262 


175 


1,415 


705 





89 


2,209 




2 


Part 


1,100 




452 


313 


3 





768 


Frederick 


1 


Half 


2,064 


1^051 


2,197 


1,426 


134 


62 


3,819 




1 


Part 








17 






17 




1 


Part 


229 


226 


'455 


258 


212 


"*3 


928 




1 


Half 


839 


235 


778 


291 


110 


132 


1,311 


Montgomery 


1 


Full 


6,124 


761 


3,174 


926 


1 


1,084 


5,185 


Prince George's. . 


2 


Half 


1,914 


1,053 


1,549 


770 


89 


55 


2,463 


Queen Anne's .... 


1 


Half 


617 


158 


521 


150 


157 


117 


945 


Talbot 


1 


Half 


2,714 


161 


236 


79 


161 


102 


578 


Washington 


1 


Full 


2,370 


1,262 


2,660 


1,261 


760 


174 


4,855 




1 


Half 


1,377 


597 


2,043 


1,043 


9 


825 


3,920 




1 


Half 


1,976 


358 


1,246 


499 





666 


2,411 



* The scope of service varies from full-time and half-time service to "part-time," mean- 
ing one or more one-day clinics per month. 



Dental Clinics 
List of Financial and Statistical Tables 



179 



LIST OF STATISTICAL AND FINANCIAL TABLES 1941-42 
Subject of Tables 



Financial Statements 180-182 

I Number of Schools 183 

II Total Public School Enrollment 184-185 

III Catholic Private Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff.. 186-187 

IV Non-Catholic Private Schools: Enrollment and 

Teaching Staff 188-189 

V Non-Public Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 190 

VI Average Number of Public School Pupils Belonging 191 

VII Average Daily Attendance" 192 

VIII Aggregate Days of Attendance 193 

IX Average Days in Session; Percent of Attendance 194 

X Number of Teaching Positions, Public Schools 195-196 

XI Receipts from State and Federal Government 197 

XII Receipts from All Sources 198 

XIII Total Disbursements 199 

XIV Disbursements for General Control 200 

XV Disbursements for Instruction and Operation 201 

XVI Disbursements for Maintenance, Auxiliary Agencies, and 

Fixed Charges 202 

XVII Disbursements for Debt Service and Capital Outlay 203 

XVIII Disbursements for White Elementary Schools 204 

XIX Disbursements for the Last Four Years of White 

High Schools 205 

XX Disbursements for Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior 

High Schools 206-207 

XXI Disbursements for Colored Elementary Schools 208 

XXII Disbursements for Colored High Schools 209 

XXIII Cost, Enrollment, Attendance, Graduates, Courses in 

Individual County High Schools 210-215 

XXIV Enrollment by Subject in Individual County High Schools . 216-221 



180 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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d 

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Financial Statements — State Public School Budget 



181 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 1942 



Source or Purpose 


State 
Department 
of Education 


Towson 
State Teachers 
College 


Frostburg 
State Teachers 
College 


Salisbury 
State Teachers 1 
College 


Bowie 
State Teachers 
College 


Receipts 


Transfers by Budget Amendment b 


$64,474.00 

735. 00 
3.20 


$142,909.00 
a74, 153.35 
17,812.87 
b7,312.50 
7,476.95 


$47,580.00 
33,347.50 
10,443.86 
b3,392.00 
241.69 


$51,532.00 
36,611.29 
10,310.23 
b4,020.00 
1,976.42 


$41,025.00 
19,359.98 

b3,335\80 
684.25 


$65,212.20 


$249,664.67 


$95,005.05 


$104,449.94 


$64,405.03 



Disbursements 



Salaries, Wages and Special Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light, Heat, Power and Water 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Printing, Other than Office Supplies. . 

AH Other Contractual Services 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies 

Laundry, Cleaning and Disintecting 
Supplies 

Refrigeration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational and Recrea- 
tional Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical Supplies. . 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Building Materials 

Plumbing Materials 

Electrical Materials 

Painting Materials 

Motor Vehicle Materials 

Materials for Equipment 

Highway Materials 

Sewer and Water Materials 

All Other Materials 

Office Equipment 

Household Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory Equipment . . 

Agricultural and Botanical Equipment 

Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Educational, Vocational and Recrea- 
tional Equipment 

Tools and Machinery 

All Other Equipment 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 

Summer School 

Total Disbursements 

Transfers by Budget Amendment 

Refunds of Students' Fees (In- 
cluding Summer School) 

\°? ( Reversion to the State 

Treasury 

Unexpended balance returned to 
the State Treasury 

Grand Total 



$52,773.57 
123.13 
365.17 



2,623.18 
50.71 
2,187.44 



54.00 



1,013.54 



76.42 
1,102 .52 



59.07 



456.01 



38.20 



190.00 
208.58 



$61,321.54 
750.00 



645.00 
2,495.66 



$65,212.20 



$160,234.72 
8,743.38 
419.05 
5,718.99 
65.62 
46.75 
1,682.76 
740.95 
371.31 
26,167.32 
331.00 
9,185.30 
846.65 
119.10 

1,492.71 
320.88 

1,762.37 
130.34 
654.53 
580.77 
168.96 
1,215.26 
24.85 
685.51 
65.71 
68.05 
355.41 



891.87 
* 50 i 56 

122! 66 

1,366.53 
7.00 



4,928.72 
5.10 
100.00 



1,779.90 
125.00 
15,444.55 



$247,019.48 



C442.50 
1,429.00 
773.69 



$249,664.67 



$61,871.64 
327.55 
81.75 
1,845.70 
154.86 
50.71 
452.63 
129.20 
1,205.53 
7,949.14 



1,461.36 
114.06 
585.62 

202.37 



1,663.73 
19.70 
218.80 
97.21 



768.79 
35.41 

170.00 
5.06 
7.05 

207.85 

' "4!78 
'46i27 



200.00 
1,607.43 
298.23 



2,888.47 
21.20 



549.31 
9,035129 



$94,276.70 



c247.65 
476.00 
4.70 



$95,005.05 



$64,196.65 
880.63 
174.38 
2,043.93 
207.98 
11.39 
916.42 
110.00 
1,151.04 
9,788.89 



5,769.17 
503.85 
816.21 

463.77 
56.65 

1,676.33 
14.36 
457.70 
13.48 



846.90 
95.65 

184.60 
23.88 
16.22 

164.71 

"47i38 
6.28 

' 77.19 
82.30 

730 ! 04 



1,591.34 
124.97 
583.23 



774.53 
6,967i62 



$101,509.67 



c2,425.05 
515.00 
.22 



$104,449.94 



a Includes $1,249.95 received for faculty board and $360 for rent of cottage. 

b Includes amounts transferred from Public Schools to aid in making up deficits in students' fees 
as follows : Towson — $6,500.00 ; Frostburg — $3,000.00 ; Salisbury — $3,500.00 ; Bowie— $2,885.00. The remainder 
was transferred to take care of cost of war risk insurance. 

c Includes refunds of summer school fees as follows : Towson — $171.00 ; Frostburg — $173.79 ; Salis- 
bury— $97.00. 



152 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30. 1942 











n 












c 










c g 


J8 














.2 £ 


Source or Purpose 


z — 


ucati 


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Receipts 



State Appropriation 


$15 


850 


00 


$11,000.00 


$19,000.00 


$9,600.00 


$4,000.00 


Receipts (including transfers 
by budget amendment) . . . 














al4 


514 


40 


Ml ,897. 88 




'800.21 


cl,200.00 


Total Receipts 


$30 


364 


40 


$22,897.88 


$19,000.00 


$10,400.21 


$5,200.00 



Disbursements 



Salaries, Wages and Special 

Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Printing , Other than Office 

Supplies 

Other Contractual Services. . 

Office Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and 

Recreational Supplies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Office Equipment 

Motor Vehicles 

Educational, Vocational, and 

Recreational Equipment . . 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 



$12,544.50 



17.00 
d2,329.62 



511.96 



$17,950.02 



82.04 
2,398.10' 



162.64 



Total Disbursements. . 

Returned to State 
Treasury 

Transferred by Budget 
Amendment 



d9, 848.94 
169.53 



490.70 
228.35 



d3 . 799 . 82 
402.30 
16.33 



$30,359.05 
5.35 



$8,438.16 
28.00 
28.10 
1,083.78 
1.40 
801.59 



52.49 

412.00 
416.75 

929.69 

12.20, 
110.00 
51.24 



532.60 

164.08 
299.20 
4,275.96 
84.30 



68.85 



$22,770.67 



20.41 
10.00 



$15,836.43 



Grand Total . 



127.21, 1,413.36 

I 1,750.21 

$30,364.40 $22,897.88 $19,000.00 



$8,098.54 



919.45 
28.00 
30.37 

1,126.48 



18.27 



$10,221.11 



179.10 



$10,400.21 



$4,000.00 
' *734.6i 



$4,734.61 
e465.39 

$5,200.00 



a Includes $14,058.42 from Federal Funds, 
b Includes $10,622.88 from Federal Funds, 
c From General Education Board. 

d Includes transportation, tuition, and equipment for trainees, 
e Unused travel allowance refunded to General Education Board. 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTS AT STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 



Purpose 


Towson 
State Teachers 
College 


Frostburg 
State Teachers 
College . 


Salisbury 
State Teachers 
College 


Bowie 
State Teachers 
College 


Receipts 


Loan of 1939 


$100,000.00 
51,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$ 


$ 




5,000.00 


30,000,00 


$151,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$5,000.00 


$30,000.00 



Disbursements 



Advertising for bids 

Architects' Fees 

Construction 

Equipment 

Total Disbursements. 
Reverted to Treasury . 
Balance to 1943 

Grand Total 



$18.60 
8.261.81 
137,332.27 
4,020.63 



$149,633.31 
$151,000.00 



2,264.15 



$2,264.15 
97^73o! 85 
$100,000.00 



4,978.05 



$4,978.05 
21.95 



$5,000.00 



$6.60 
501.89 
17,184.16 
3,808.59 



$21,501.24 
8i498!76 
$30,000.00 



Financial Statements; Number of Schools 



183 



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184 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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186 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE III 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools in 
Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



County and School 



Allegany 
*S. S. Peter's and Paul's, 

Cumberland 

*St. Patrick's Catholic Girls' 
Central High, Cumberland . . 

*St. Mary's, Cumberland 

St. Michael's, Frostburg. ...... 

*La Salle Institute, Cumberland . 

*St. Peter's, Westernport 

St. Patrick's, Mt. Savage 

St. Joseph's, Midland 

Total (8) 

Anne Arundel 

St. Mary's, Annapolis 

St. Mary's (Col.), Annapolis. . . 

Baltimore 
*School of the Immaculate and 
Catholic High, Towson 

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, 

Middle River 

*Loyola High, Towson 

St. Mark's, Catonsville 

St. Michael's, Overlea 

*St. Stephen's, Bradshaw 

St. Clement's, Rosedale 

St. Joseph's, Fullerton 

St. Ursula, Parkville 

St. Rita's, Dundalk 

Ascension, Halethorp 

St. Charles', Pikesville 

St. Agnes,' Woodlawn 

*St. Charles' College, Catonsville 

St. Clement's, Lansdowne 

Mt. de Sales, Catonsville 

St. Joseph's, Texas 

St. Vincent's Orphanage, 

Towson 

Sacred Heart, Glyndon 

Total (19) 



Enrollment 



- £ 



511 

327 
353 
280 

139 
170 
106 



1,886 



306 
73 



372 
475 

3ii 

292 
190 
248 
238 
215 
214 
195 
160 
149 

i45 
15 
84 

69 
49 



3,421 



£ 



95 



11 



' "2 
u C 

ID o 



109 



51 



194 

57 



494 



185 



468 



77 



147 

83 



960 



88 



146 



County and School 



Calvert 

Our Lady Star of the Sea, 
Solomon's 

Caroline 

St. Gertrude's Academy, 
Ridgely 

Carroll 

*St. John's, Westminster 

St. Joseph's, Taneytown 

Total (2) 

Cecil 

Immaculate Conception, Elkton 

Charles 

*Sacred Heart, La Plata 

*St. Mary's, Notre Dame High 
School, Bryantown 

Total (2) 

St. Mary's (Col.), Bryantown.. 

Frederick 

*St. John's, Frederick 

St. Euphemia's, Emmitsburg . . . 
St. Anthony's, Emmitsburg .... 
*St. Joseph's College High, 

Emmitsburg 

Visitation, Frederick 

St. Peter's, Libertytown 

Total (6) 

St. Euphemia's (Col.), Em- 
mitsburg 

Garrett 

St. Peter's, Oakland 

Harford 

St. Margaret's, Bel Air 



Enrollment 



32 



21 



136 
27 



163 

109 

205 
133 



338 
126 



144 
178 
116 



488 



103 



* Secondary school accredited by the Maryland State Board of Education. 



Enrollment in Catholic Schools 



187 



TABLE III— (Continued) 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools in 
Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



County and School 



Enrollment 



* S 



E 6 

<= E 



t C 



County and School 



Enrollment 



>> 






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5 


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3? 


~5 


b 


JS 

a 


if 


e'E 

; - 


■ d 


at 

V 

c_ 




O E 


Efl O 




172 






6 


89 






2 


261 






8 


307 




94 


17 


10,643 


189 


2,487 


508 


609 




17 






1,116 


39 


26 




832 


35 


241 




525 


47 






614 


18 






404 


19 


153 




202 


30 


223 




179 


32 


141 






6 


51 






13 


39 






2 


874 




3,872 


241 


962 




141 


27 


24,453 


377 




581 


414 


22 


7 


38 


26,703 


399 


4,020 


887 


68 




113 


15 


1,002 






22 


179 




15 


22 


1,249 




128 


59 


37,346 


588 


6,507 


1,395 


1,858 




128 


76 



HOWARD 

♦Trinity, Ilchester 

St. Paul's, EllicottCity 

♦St. Louis,' Clarksville 

St. Augustine's, Elk Ridge 

Total (4) 

St. Augustine's (Col.), Ellicott 
City 

Montgomery 

St. Michael's, Silver Spring. . . 
Our Lady of Lourdes, Bethesda 
Academy of the Holy Name, 

Silver Spring 

♦Georgetown Prep., Garrett Pk. 
St. Martin's, Gaithersburg 

Total (5) 

Prince George's 

St. James,' Mt. Rainier 

Holy Redeemer, Berwyn 

♦St. Mildred's, Laurel 

St. Mary's, Marlboro 

♦La Salle Hall, Ammendale .... 

Total (5) 

St. Mary's (Col.), Marlboro . . 

St. Mary's 
♦St. Mary's Academy, Leonard- 
town 

♦St. Michael's, Ridge 

Little Flower, Great Mills 

St. Joseph's, Morganza 

St. John's, Hollywood 

Holy Angels, Abell 

Sacred Heart, Bushwood 

Our Lady, Medley's Neck .... 

Leonard Hall, Leonardtown . . . 

Total (8) 



92 
144 

85 
89 



410 
62 



471 

229 



20 
127 



847 



413 
266 
163 

85 



927 
84 



105 
150 
191 
186 
164 
137 
112 
105 
65 



25 



73 



147 
108 



25 



Hi 



255 



16 



83 



123 
74 



26 



13 



49 



St. Peter Claver's (Col.), Ridge 
St. Joseph's (Col.), Morganza.. 

Total (Col.) (2) 



Washington 
♦St. Mary's (Hagerstown) 



,215 



197 



47 



All Maryland Counties 

White Catholic Schools (67) . . 
Colored Catholic Schools (7) . . . 

Baltimore City 

♦Seton 

♦Mt. St. Joseph's 

♦Institute of Notre Dame 

♦Catholic High 

♦Calvert Hall 

♦Notre Dame of Maryland 

♦Mt. St. Agnes 

Mt. Washington Country 

Visitation 

Calvert Hall Country 

Total (10) 

♦St. Martin's 

50 Other White Parish Schools 
5 Institutions for White Children 

Total White (65) 

♦St. Francis Academy 

3 Colored Parish Schools 

4 Institutions for Colored 
Children 

Total Colored (8) 

Entire State 

White (132) 

Colored (15) 



* Secondary school accredited by the Maryland State Board of Education. 



188 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE IV 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Non-Catholic Private Elementary and Secondary 
Schools in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1942 



County and School 



Enroll- 
ment 



Ele- 
men- 
tary 



Sec- 
ond- 
ary 



No. OF 
Teachers 



Full- 
time 



Part- 
time. 



County and School 



Enroll- 
ment 


No. OP 
Teachers 


Ele- 
men- 
tary 


Sec- 
ond- 
ary 


Full- 

time 


Part- 
time 


181 
133 

76 


218 
85 
in 


12 
18 

D 

6 


12 
2 


79 

AR 


A 


8 

A 




t53 
43 


41 


2 
5 
4 


17 
6 


t32 
tl9 




4 

A 

2 


2 

i 


662 


448 


75 


40 


OO 

37 


1 Q 


1U 

4 




22 




1 




10 




1 




§15 




1 




122 


19 


17 




17 


18 


6 


1 


5 




1 




OO 


1 a 
18 


n 
1 


i 


17 


*123 


11 






*42 


5 


1 


17 


165 


16 


1 


t34 




6 




10 
t33 


70 


12 

2 


1 

2 


17 




1 




60 


70 


15 


3 


t26 




2 




2,036 


1,775 


327 


85 



Allegany 

Waddell 

Anne Arundel 

♦Severn, Severna Park 

Cochran-Bryan 

Holladay 

Annapolis Nursery and Kin- 
dergarten 

Primary School, U. S. Naval 

Academy 

Thomas, Annapolis 

Total (6) 

Baltimore 

*McDonogh 

Garrison Forest, Garrison . . . 
Hannah More Academy, 

Reisterstown 

St. Timothy's, Catonsville . . . 

Greenwood, Ruxton 

Crosby, Catonsville 

Oldfields, Glencoe 

Blue Bird, Ruxton 

Village Nursery, Pikesville . . . 
Playground, Pinehurst Road 
Miss Barnhart's Kindergarten 

Dundalk L 

Harford Park Kindergarten, 

Parkville 

Lutherville Kindergarten 
Crestmont, Stevenson 

"otal (14) 



ECIL 

♦Jacob Tome Institute, Port 
Deposit 

♦West Nottingham Academy 
Seventh Day Adventist, 
Perry ville 

Total (3) 



Harford 

Tiny Tot Nursery, Bel Air . 



x22 



43 
J35 



117 



t300 
64 

94 

18 
t^69 

°47 
119 
J26 

t20 

tl8 
U7 
2 



694 



f208 
17 



23 



♦112 
68 



180 



♦300 



679 



♦100 
♦89 



24 



248 



§12 



196 



135 



28 



30 



10 



Montgomery 

Columbia Jr. College, Ta- 

koma Park 

London (Boys), Edgemoor. . . 

Bullis, Silver Spring 

Countryside, Silver Spring . . . 
Chevy Chase Country, 17 

Grafton St _. 

Slade, Olney 

Nat'l Park College, Forest 

Glen 

JGreen Acres, Bethesda 

Longfellow (Boys), Bethesda. 
fJohn Carroll (Boys), Silver 

Spring 

Chevy Chase Jr. College .... 
JLady Isabel, Edgemoor Lane . 

Total (12) 

Prince George's 

Briarley Military Academy, 
Ammendale 

Avondale Country, Laurel . . . 

Hillside Seventh Day Adven- 
tist, Sherman Ave., Ben- 
nings, D. C 

Seventh Day Adventist, 

Laurel 

§Mrs. Ballinger's Nursery, 
Riverdale 

Total (5) 

Queen Anne's 

Gunston, Centreville 

Seventh Day Adventist, 
Grason ville 

Total (2) 

St. Mary's 

♦Charlotte Hall 

♦St. Mary's Female Seminary, 
St. Mary's City 

Total (2) 

Talbot 
tCountry, Easton 

Washington 

St. James, Hagerstown 

tMisses Hoffmeier and Camp- 
bell, Hagerstown 

Seventh Day Adventist, 
Smithsburg 

Total (3) 

Wicomico 

Mrs. Herold's 

Total County White (51). . . 



* Secondary school accredited by Maryland 

State Board of Education, 
t Includes kindergarten. 
Includes nursery school. 



x Kindergarten only. 
§ Nursery school only. 

t Includes nursery school and kindergarten. 



Enrollment in Non-Catholic Non-Public Schools 189 



TABLE IV— (Continued) 



Number of Pupils and Teachers in Non-Catholic Private Elementary and 
Secondary Schools in Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1942 









Number of 




Enrollment 


Teachers 


School 










Elemen- 




Full- 


Part- 




tary 


Secondary 


time 


time 





*244 


14o 


28 


5 




T175 


115 


27 


8 




tl70 


113 


29 


5 


Roland Park Country, 817 W. University Parkway. . 


J175 


93 


19 


11 




t241 


20 


12 


7 




f257 


• • ■ • 


18 


4 




fl72 


80 


29 


2 


St. Paul's School (Boys), 2101 W. Rogers Ave 


138 


96 


11 


2 


Boy's Latin, Brevard St 


60 


64 


10 


2 




113 




4 






J108 




10 


' " 2 


Girl's Latin, 10 Club Road 


21 


64 


8 


6 


Nursery and Child Study Home 721 Woodbourne. . . 


$82 




3 


1 


Samuel Ready, 5100 Old Frederick Road 


46 


*32 


4 


5 


Franklin Day School, Park Ave. and Franklin St. . . . 


30 


♦42 


3 


8 


Miss Crater's Country School,3524 Meadowside Road 


*63 




4 




Salvation Army Day Nursery, 242 S. Patterson P'k Ave. 


§58 




7 


4 




34 


14 




2 


Kornerstone Kindergarten, Lafayette and Bolton Sts. 


US 




2 


1 




§42 




3 




Whitmore Nursery, 3319 Alto Road 


§36 




2 




Happy Day Nursery, 507 Dunkirk Road 


J32 




3 




Cathedral Kindergarten, Univ. Parkway and Chase St. 


131 




3 


' ' 2 


The Ireland, 3021 Wayne Ave 


§25 




3 




Forest Park Hebrew Nursery, 3202 Garrison Blvd. . . 


§25 




3 


... 


Southwest Center Nursery School, 1920 Wilkins Ave. 


§25 




2 






§20 




2 


1 


Woodland Nursery, 3911 Groveland Ave 


§20 




2 




Matthews, Brightside Road, Woodbrook, Govans 


tl9 




1 






T19 




2 




Little School in Guilford, 15 Cold Spring Lane, West 


tl8 




3 


' ' 2 


Walbrook Memorial School Center, Gwynns Falls 










§13 










§12 






... 




§11 








Kirwan Nursery School, 1511 Park Ave 


§11 








Aline B. Strauss, 2203 Eutaw Place 


§10 








Epiphany Kindergarten, Arlington Ave. and Old 










York Road 


x8 






1 


Garden School, 1525 Bolton St. 


3 










2,612 


878 


267 


84 


School for Colored Pupils 










Seventh Day Adventist, Harlem Ave. and Dolphin St. 


50 


13 


3 


1 



* Secondary school accredited by Maryland State Board of Education, 
t Includes kindergarten. 

t Includes nursery school and kindergarten. 
§ Nursery school only, 
x Kindergarten only. 



190 1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE V 



Number of Pupils Reported Enrolled in Maryland Non-Public Elementary and 
Secondary Schools, for the Year Ending June 30, 1942 



County 


White 


Colored 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Enrollment 


Number 
of 

Teachers 




Enrollment 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Elemen- 
tary 


Com- 
mer- 
cial 


Second- 
ary 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Elemen- 
tary 


Second- 
ary 


■("Catholic Parish and Private Institutions 


Allegany ^ 


8 


1,886 


95 


494 


88 










Anne Arundel 


1 


306 






8 


" i 


' 73 




"2 




19 


3,421 


' ii 


960 


146 










Calvert 


1 


32 


7 


8 


6 












1 


21 




8 


7 










Carroll 


2 


163 




32 


8 










Cecil '. 


1 


109 






3 


... 








Charles 


2 


338 




' '85 


15 




126 




"2 


Frederick 


6 


488 


' 30 


19£ 


49 


i 


3 




1 


Garrett 


1 


70 






4 












1 


103 






3 


... 










4 


410 




' *73 


26 




' 62 




"2 


Montgomery 


5 


847 


''25 


255 


49 


. ... 








Prince George's 

St. Mary's 


5 


927 


16 


83 


32 




' 84 




"2 


9 


1,215 


5 


197 


47 


2 


261 




8 




1 


307 




94 


17 










Total Counties 


67 


10,643 


189 


2,487 


508 


7 


609 




17 


Baltimore City 


65 


26,703 


399 


4,020 


887 


8 


1,249 


128 


59 


Total State 


132 


37,346 


588 


6,507 


1,395 


15 


1,858 


128 


76 


*Non-Catholic Private Schools 


Allegany 


1 


22 






1 












6 


117 




180 


24 












14 


694 




679 


165 










Cecil 7 


3 


248 




196 


38 












1 


12 






1 










Montgomery 


12 


662 




'448 


115 










Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


5 


122 




19 


17 










2 


22 




18 


8 










St. Mary's 


2 


17 




165 


17 










Talbot 


1 


34 






6 












3 


60 




' 70 


18 












1 


26 






2 










Total Counties 

Baltimore City 

Total State 


51 

38 


2,036 
2,612 




1,775 
878 


412 
351 


.... 


"50 


"is 


' ' 4 


89 


4,648 




2,653 


763 


1 


50 


13 


4 



♦Schools for Atypical Children 



Maryland Training School for Boys. . . 


268 




23 


4" 










Maryland School for the Deaf 


155 




19 


18 










Maryland Training School for Colored 


















Girls 












62 


11 


1 


Montrose School for Girls 


"70 
















Maryland School for the Blind 


62 




"12 


' i6 






"2 


' ' 5 


Dept. for Colored Deaf 












52 




7 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute 


' 66 






"7 










Open Air School, State Sanitorium . . . 


56 






1 










Reinhardt School for Deaf Children. . . 


10 






2 










Rosewood State Training School 


199 






10 











t Figures furnished by Rev. John L Barrett, Superintendent of Catholic Schools. 
* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



Enrollment in Non-Public Schools; Average Number 191 
Belonging Public Schools 



1 
1 




P 


1 siSilisliliSiilllSiSili mU 3 


! 
1 

* 




42,131 

4,020 
2 ,953 
6,193 
341 
937 
1,880 

'905 
1,264 
2,486 
1,221 
1,642 
787 
643 
3,369 
4,009 
608 
588 
906 
834 
2,512 
1 , 597 
1,077 

22,422 

2,223 
6,257 
13,942 

64,o53 


Total 
Ele- 
mentary 
Schools 


127,956 

11,128 
9 , 083 

18,738 
1,767 
2,202 
4,545 
3,218 
2,782 
3,291 
6,890 
3,409 
4,909 
2,748 
1 , 682 

12,032 

14,121 
1,796 
1,525 
2,814 
2,133 

10,327 
4,067 
2,749 

86,005 
71 , 566 

14^439 
213,961 


g 


Total 
Colored 


8 illjpiiii ;iSISsli!ls!l liip. 1 


I 

PQ 

2 


Regular 
High 


1 * ;§2 SSIS ig^siassa il : : : : : 1 


p 

>S 
Q 


Junior, 
Senior, 
Junior- 
Senior 
High (8 
or 9 to 
11 or 12) 


457 
64 
x25i 

ioi 

41 

3 , 659 

'435 
1,149 
2,075 

4,116 


! 


Junior 
High 
(7 or 7-8) 


196 
48 

' 80 

3,325 
3^ 325 
3,521 


1 


i 




1,120 
150 

iio 

' '83 

i77 

23,672 
23,672 

24,792 


i 




Grades 
1-7(8) 


§ Si - J£ J ~~ 




Total 
White 


s IEIZ3S3iSHI£S«SSHSS3 EiBH 1 


ay Pupils Belong 


Regular 
I High 

) 


6 19,493 

6 

2,481 

2 .... 

228 

3 

8 1,111 
1,240 

575 
956 
2,308 
1,221 

7 1,180 

710 
492 

3^611 
486 
409 
630 

4 306 

1/215 

9 334 

3 
8 

8 

7 

9 19,493 


Junior 
Senior, 
Junior 
Senior 
High (1 
or 9 to 
11 or IS 


17,91 

3 ,95 

5^94 

78 
66 

28 
3^02 

33 
2,47 

44 

18,76 

1,78 
5,10 
11,86 

36,67 


r White E 


1 


~ High 
(7 or 7-8) 

I 


9 111 aS = ::::« = =1 = = : 2 1 3 : i 

t- « M £ 00 


IOOLS FC 


Elementary 


t- 


g i ;i :il ; ; : : 1 ; ;i ; : : ;ig i ii : ; ; S 

It?* - 55 S 


HI 

o 


Grades 
1-7(8) 


3 KSPSSHttSI :Sig§§Sss : : : : : S 

oo ,_I?0 ^J 08 <m ih n <o eo eo c» >h *4«h <n csi oo 


County 




Total Counties. 
Anne Arundel . . 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester. . . . 

Kent 

Montgonru ry . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City . 
Elementary . . 
Vocational . . . 
Junior High. . 
Senior High . . 

Total State 



192 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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193 



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21 


t4, 398, 192 

46,101 
540,063 
*342,100 
171 938 
117',248 
59,876 
74,806 
255,545 
223,313 
146,698 

145,791 
104,692 
128,169 
320,118 
537,493 
111,506 
149,656 
245,234 
154,825 
46,283 
257,553 
219,184 

°5, 112,284 
3,919,424 
71,252 
756,324 
365,284 

°9, 510, 476 




P 


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II 


f24, 161,778 

f2, 590,014 
1,451,906 
f3, 966, 309 
158,588 
403,512 
1,013,296 
676,027 
333,678 
540,266 
1,423,135 
783,112 
934,703 
477,284 
266,209 
2,205,762 
2,508,931 
288,739 
196,367 
379,270 
339,424 
2,126,719 
T700.646 
397,881 

$13,322,056 
8,072,532 
313,960 
2,841,996 
2,093,568 

37,483,834 






3,306,225 

413,514 

38,509 

188,729 
204,574 

96,412 
162,551 
396,028 
207,378 
199,858 
121,664 

83,808 

617,661 
81,534 
69,431 

107,942 
50,616 

210,394 
55,622 

3,306,225 


1 


Jr., Sr., 
Jr.-Sr. 
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or 9 to 11 
or 12) 


1 8 ii :3I : : : i !3 : 3 : i : :|| it B :IU S 


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II 


til, 486, 334 

214,995 
1,038,392 
2,109,724 
120,079 
6,903 
517,404 
471,453 
237,266 
377,715 
1,027,107 
575.734 
581,188 
355,620 
182,401 

1,891,270 
207,205 
126,936 
271,328 
101,584 
447,618 
t490,252 
134,160 

11,486,334 


! 


Total Counties 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's .... 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Baltimore City 

Elementary 

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Senior High 

Total State 



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194 



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$14,761.23 

1,123.78 
3,567.09 

421.51 
539.08 
7.50 
1,488.05 
849.92 

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108.88 
81.49 

L,891.84 

15.50 
488.22 

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$132,700.62 

17,194.57 
6,659.27 

10,661 19 
499.45 
2,373.95 
3,912.81 
4,290.07 
1,226.75 
4,158.1!) 
7,244.50 
1,467.62 
4,007.95 
2,259.79 
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1,894.17 
400.52 
1,980.07 
L,756.7J 
8,523.40 
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1,055.37 

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$275,563.70 


Fuel 


$320,036.16 

19,316.61 
21,030.07 
30,995.74 
2,945.71 
8,750.34 
11,069.75 
13,337.28 
8,134.15 
6,917.07 
17,462.98 
3,827.58 
13,544.96 
8,119.16 
8,935.45 
41,929.47 
88,978.04 
7,926.17 
4,026.88 
7,040.25 
9,865.90 
19,974.72 
11,456.80 
8,956.08 

kl76,812.29 

$496,848.45 


Janitors' 
Supplies 


$70,435.32 

10,027.79 
2,293.35 
5,498.57 

701.90 
1,365.71 
1,681.57 
2,411.53 
2,040.04 

942.51 
6,364.80 
1,247.34 

824.40 
1,669.29 

609.22 
9,1 10.13 
9,209.94 
1,750.67 

896.50 
1,293.86 
1,325.42 
4,340.89 
3,844.23 

985.66 

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$95,036.95 



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Capital 
Outlay 


$348,100.00 

2,986.11 
19.37 
9,384.65 


12,390.13 

7.84 
13.72 


21.56 

718.58 
5,491.91 


6,210.49 
25,345.28 


25,345.28 

16.62 
133.34 


149.96 


30.20 
39,860.42 


39,890.62 
' 95.66 


95.00 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


$2,264,572.81 

176,160.05 
8,909.82 
328,244.16 


513,314.03 

4,373.72 
9,938.02 


14,311.74 

44,344.54 
48,768.80 
430,934.15 


524,047.49 

3,094.34 
18,203.68 


21,298.02 

13,876.98 
85,032.77 


98,909.75 

11,294.59 
8,191.11 
53,738.06 


73,223.76 

1,440.58 
8,827.59 


10,268.17 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


$182,802.56 

17,260.19 
758.54 
33,509.78 


51,528.51 

493.20 
788.00 


1,281.20 

5,996.40 
3 015.63 
34,812!l3 


43,824.16 

249.63 
1,231.84 


1,481.47 

3,322.49 
11,817.82 


15,140.31 

1,731.10 
1 969.03 
9,'609.51 


13,309.64 

272.42 
2,230.99 


2,503.41 


Main- 
tenance 


$60,740.81 

3,252.43 
256.39 
9,853.57 


13,362.39 

166.48 
500.35 


666.83 

1,144.08 
1 338.46 
1<M>41.08 


12,523.62 

73.18 
241.10 


314.28 

359.58 
3,496.19 


8,855.77 

189.08 
155.71 
1,270.82 


1,615.61 

32.06 
142.10 


174.16 


Operation 


$184,196.99 

17,912.64 
904.18 
31,863.37 


50,680.19 

356.33 
1,019.71 


1,376.04 

3,288.56 
3,419.68 
25,318.38 


32,026.62 

448.76 
1,815.67 


2,264.43 

1,129.31 
6,737.66 


7,866.97 

550.63 
541.25 
3,647.92 


4,739.80 

56.10 
409.30 


465.40 


Total 
Costs 
of In- 
struction 


$1,836,832.45 

137,734.79 
6,990.71 
253,017.44 


397,742.94 

3,357.71 
7,629.96 


10,987.67 

83,915.50 
40,995.03 
360,762.56 


435,673.09 

2,322.77 
14,915.07 


17,237.84 

9,065.60 
62,981.10 


72,046.70 

8,823.78 
5,525.12 
39,209.81 


53,558.71 

1,080.00 
6,045.20 


7,125.20 


Other 
Costs 
of In- 
struction 


$38,346.88 

2,336.67 
81.51 
5,120.94 


7,539.12 


16.72| 


15.72 

294.11 
429.90 
9,917.30 


10,641.31 


28.34 


28.34 

44.86 
273.39 


318.25 

33.60 
77.65 
1,071.49 


1,182.74 

1.00 
43.77 


44.77 


Materials 

of In- 
struction 


$47,899.06 

3,880.04 
265.98 
8,703.76 


12,849.78 

45.80 
299.22 


345.02 

1,023.65 
1 320.80 
8|006!67 


10,351.12 

96.73 
618.50 


715.23 

191.60 
1,390.27 


1,581.87 

94.07 
166.45 
1,203.44 


j 1,463.96 

3.50 
j 879.89 


883.39 


Text- 
books 


$47,357.30 

7,321.68 
174.22 
6,236.04 


13,731.94 

283.70 
203.54 


487.24 

333.35 
398.14 
6,544.96 


7,276.45 
695.68 


695.68 

182.14 
1,021.85 


1,203.99 

146.11 

241.02 
1,292.88 


1,680.01 

15.50 
122.73 


138.23 


Salaries 
of Principals 
and 
Teachers! 


$1,703,229.21 

124,196.40 
6,469.00 
f232.956.70 


t363,622.10 

3,028.21 
7,111.48 


10,139.69 

32,264.39 
38,846.19 
t336,293.63 


rH TjllO 

cm ©to 
tj5 co cm 

O CM t- 
■f CM^ 

t> M*eo 

O rH 

•«* H— 
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tl5,798.59 

8,647.00 
60,295.59 


68,942.59 

8,550.00 
5,040.00 
35,642.00 


L 49,232.00 

1,060.00 
6,498.81 


6,558.81 


3ni3aojag 

»d ;soo 


$92.83 

73.10 
88.22 
85.15 


80.63 

91.12 
155.28 


127.78 

63.99 
75.26 
81.40 


78.98 

38.68 
72.52 


64.34 

58.31 
108.60 


96.88 

75.30 
154.55 
87.38 


89.52 

102.90 
87.40 


89.29 


jaqoBaj, 

93BJ3AV 


$1,714 

1,543 
1,659 
1,584 


1,571 

1,442 
1,823 


1,690 

1,744 
1,850 
1,912 


1,891 

1,113 
1,437 


1,380 

1,330 
1,489 


1,467 

1,474 
1,738 
1,536 


1,543 

1,514 
1,309 


1,339 


jo jaquin^i 


983.6 

80.5 
3.9 
141.8 


226.2 

2.1 
3.9 


6.0 

18.5 
21.0 
172.5 


212.0 

2.0 
9.4 


11.4 

6.5 
40.5 


47.0 

6.8 
2.9 
23.2 


OS t>(M 
rH '-rj! 
CO 


os 
■<* 


j'aqam^ 


24,179 

2,231 
95 
3,652 


X LO CM 

t> Tf CO 

to 


107 

642 
610 
4,961 


6,213 

74 

235 


OS Ht* 

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CO Tj<Tjtf 

OS rH tO 


CO rH OS 
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25,946 

2,410 
101 
3,855 


CO 00 f 
CO "<* <£> 

eo 

CO* 


112 

693 
648 
5,294 


6,635 

80 
251 


rH X eo 

co eo x 
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1,021 

150 
53 
615 


X ^J«rH 
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County 


Total Counties 

Allegany 
White: 

Grades 7-8 

Grade 9, Yr. I . . 
9-12, I-IV 

Tnt*l 


Colored: 


9-12, I-IV 

Tnt.il 


Baltimore 
White: 

Grade 7 


Grade 8, Yr. I . . 
8-11, I-IV 

Total 


Colored: 

P.raHp 7 


h 


3 
c 
E- 


Caroline 

Grade 7 


8-11, I-IV 
Total 


Carroll 

White: 


j 
m 

* 


8-11, I-IV 

Total 

Colored: 

Grade 7 . 


8-11, I-IV 

Total 





Disbursements for Junior and Junior-Senior High Schools 207 



$7.04 
192.89 


199.93 

108,345.28 
17,563.04 
19,984.97 

114,730.77 


260,624.06 




96.92 


96.92 

601.25 
671.96 
429.66 
1,573.19 


3,076.05 










6,883.96 
2,653.10 


9,537.06 

8,076.51 
135.60 


rH t- 
rH rH 

oi oj 

CM CO 

« s 

CO 


$3,807.38 
25,285.07 


29,092.45 

198,733.49 
71,371.27 
166,033.03 
114,697.96 


650,835.75 

4,727.21 
81,709.60 


36,436.81 

97,918.15 
43,976.63 
94,878.12 
101,130.30 


337,903.20 

3,517.65 
6,478.04 


8,995.69 

5,659.93 
40,276.02 


45,935.95 

1,714,449.94 
1,634,742.03 


3,349,191.97 

895,437.56 
285,038.64 


680,476.20 
$6,294,240.98 


$246.22 
88.26 


334.48 

12,413.00 
741.61 
878.58 
1,421.27 


15,454.46 

1,176.09 
8,151.46 


4,327.65 

8,245.17 
1,307.35 
3,792.83 
11,392.47 


24,737.82 

667.22 
342.65 


1,009.87 

1,401.81 
6,467.87 


7,869.68 

22,939.76 
29 533 74 


62,473.50 

5,112.79 
8,193.45 


13,806.24 
$248,682.80 


$107.34 
2,238.20 


2,345.54 

4,900.68 
1,554.68 
3,897.32 
1,981.68 


12,334.36 

111.48 
1,167.58 


1,279.06 

2,852.80 
695.84 
3.286.76 
3,853.12 


10,688.52 

66.03 
66.03 


132.06 

86.00 
1,362.61 


1,448.61 

39,065.00 
33 656.36 


72,721.36 

8,784.40 
7,607.64 


16,392.04 
$149,854.21 


$241.94 
3,019.55 


8,261.49 

22,814.63 
7,444.08 

14,494.78 
8,475.11 


63,228.60 

433.09 
2,674.80 


3,007.89 

6,754.32 
2,646.14 
6,389.67 
6,076.36 


20,866.39 

192.64 
290.60 


483.24 

446.99 
3,482.94 


3,929.93 

182,493.41 
164,309.41 


346,802.82 

44,827.98 
30,284.67 


75,112.65 
$606,112.46 


$3,211.88 
19,939.06 


23,150.94 

158,605.18 
61,630.90 
146,762.35 
102,819.90 


469,818.33 

3,006.55 
24,815.76 


27,822.31 

80,065.86 
89,327.30 
82,408.96 
79,808.35 


281,610.47 

2,591.76 
4,778.76 


7,370.52 

3,725.13 
28,962.60 


32,687.73 

1,469,951.77 
1,407,242.52 


2,877,194.29 

336,712.39 
238,952.88 


575,665.27 
$5,289,692.01 


$4.69 
78.85 


83.64 

• 4,160.64 
1,955.00 
3,625.37 
6,231.16 


15,972.17 

13.93 
138.60 


152.43 

825.00 
130.61 
649.88 
674.56 


1,679.94 
2.94 


2.94 

10.98 
674.63 


686.61 

27,708.87 
22,331.00 


50,039.87 

5,665.87 
3,268.72 


OJ TP 

lo eo 

TP rH 
CM rH 

OJ CO 
00* t"* 
OJ 
«9- 


$19.77 
406.54 


426.31 

4,877.83 
1,437.66 
3 646.65 
2,275!68 


12,237.32 

61.03 
639.46 


700.49 

1,281.05 
790.33 
1,936.86 
1,919.91 


6,928.161 

10.31 
179.12 


189.43 

17.69 
709.30 


726.99 
23,612.56 

OI COf7 AC 


45,040.02 

6,484.37 
3,755.05 


9,239.42 
$102,178.60 


$50.79 
482.79 


533.68 

4,499.72 
1,287.82 
3,712.31 
2,270.66 


11,770.61 

63.77 
659.63 


723.40 

2,513.41 
1,531.46 
1,093.63 
3,025.95 


8,164.44 

92.20 
106.06 


198.26 

60.79 
692.78 


753.57 

19,390.13 
19,655.22 


39,045.36 

6,805.41 
6,138.98 


10,944.39 
$97,847.04 


$3,136.63 
18,970.88 


22,107.51 

145,067.49 
66,950.42 
tl35,778.02 
f92,042.40 


t429,838.33 

2,867.82 
23,378.17 


26,245.99 

76,946.40 
36,876.01 
78,728.69 
74,287.94 


265,837.94 

2,489.25 
4,490.64 


6,979.89 

3,635.67 
26,885.89 


30,521.56 

+1,399,340.21 
tl.343,728.84 


LO Tf CO 
O t> rH 

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to tOOJ 
q r-^t> 

eo* oj to" 

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CM* "* *- 
•i — 


c- eo 

CO rH 
td LO* 
LO LO 

LO_ 00 
tO* CM 

TP OJ 

LO OJ 

**- TP 

ft* 


47.59 
88.10 


79.27 

95.13 
106.87 
112.87 
129.76 


107.69 

48.24 
94.94 


84.84 

69.71 
90.30 
88.59 
110.77 


82.19 

65.14 
133.61 


94.69 

60.21 
120.60 




107.32 

106.69 
137.76 


1 19.24 

88.39 
137.37 


103.91 
$103.98 


1,206 
1,542 


tP oot-co o 

00 IOCOOJO 
Tp to OJ 30 00 


1,793 

1,366 
1,528 


00 OJrHTPO 
O OJ OJ Tp Tp 

ia to cc oj t> 


1,770 

1,810 
1,727 


1,651 

1,454 
1,519 


1,511 

2,122 
2,628 


2,844 

1,983 
2,637 


2,212 
$2,069 


2.6 

It-, o 


OJ «5^HO 

T* t^ojdd 

rH 00 CM C- LO 


237.0 

2.1 
16.3 


Tp LO LO LO 
t> C- OJ O CM 
rH ■* rH t* Tjt 


150.2 

1.9 
2.6 


4.5 

2.5 
17.7 


20.2 

648.0 
507.2 


1,156.2 

167.0 
84.6 


241.6 
2,880.4 


CM 


(O Tpt-COrH 

eo cmcmlqo 

CO OJ5OO3 00 


4,706 

92 
312 


404 

1,608 
461 
1,011 

862 


CM OOO 

TP LO CO 

00 

eo" 


oo lo oj 
CO ooo 

CO 


894 

15,117 
11.136 


26,263 

4,023 
1,943 


6,966 
66,898 


Ot- 

00 00 
CM 


t- 0>HHTf 

to OOt-C-00 

eo otOTpoo 

Oj" rH* 


6,116 

98 
884 


432 

1,640 
487 

1,071 
913 


rH TPrH 
rH LO Tp 

TP* 


LO TfTjl 

OJ OJ CO 
CO 


428 

16,222 
11,867 


28,089 

4,474 
2,076 


6,649 
60,684 




rH OJ Tp CM LQ 




1-t C-CSJrHLO 


00 HH 


rH COCO 


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TP TP 

00 


Harford 

firndp 7 


8-11, I-IV 


I 

c 
fr 


Montgomery 

Oradfi 7-8 


Grade 9, Yr. I. . 

10-12, II-IV 

9-12, I-IV 


c 
fr 


Talbot 


8-11, I-IV 


*c 
c 
fr 


Washington 
White: 

Grade 9, Yr. I . . 

10-12, II-IV 

9-12, I-IV 


z 

c 
E- 


Colored: 

HrndPR 7-R 


9-12, I-IV. ...... 


Worcester 

Grade 7 

8-11, I-IV 


1 

b 


Baltimore City 
White: 






c 
fr 


Colored: 




c 

c 

i- 


i 

i 
I 





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208 



1942 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Caroline 
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CARROLL 

Mt. Airy 

New Windsor 

Elmer Wolfe 

Jr. Charles Carroll 


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Robert Moton (Colored) . . . 

Cecil 

Elkton 

North East 

Chesapeake City 

Cecilton 

Calvert 


Total 

Elkton (Colored) 


Charles 

Lackey 

La Plata 


Total 

Pomonkey (Colored) 

Bel Alton (Colored) 





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Bel Air 

Jarrettsville 

Old Post Road 

Dublin 

Slate Ridge 


Total 

Havre de Grace (Colored) . . 
Bel Air (Colored) 


Howard 

Ellicott City 

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Cooksville (Colored) 


Kent 

Chestertown 

Rock Hall 

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Montgomery 


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219 

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INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 210-215 
Acceleration and adjustment of school pro- 
gram, 138-139 
Adapting school program to wartime con- 
ditions, 135, 138-139 
Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 103, 104 
Expenditures, 200 
Percent for, 101-102 
Superintendents, 134-147 
Adult education, 89-91, 94-96, 117, 118 
Age for entrance to first grade, 159 
Ages of boys and girls, 30-31 
Agriculture 

Adjustment for defense, 136-137 
Enrollment 

County day schools, white and colored, 

44-45, 60, 115, 116 
Each high school, 216-221 
Evening schools, 90-91 
Failures and withdrawals, white pupils, 56 
Federal aid, 94-96, 114-116, 118 
Schools having, 44, 45, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds to 
Counties and Baltimore 

Distributed by type of fund, 1941-42, 197 
1922-1942, 97-98 
1941-1942, 99-100, 180, 197 
State teachers colleges, 169-170, 180-181 
Vocational education, 114-118, 180, 182 

Defense training, 94 
Vocational rehabilitation, 92, 180, 182 
Appropriations 

County, 1942-1943, 128-129 
County and State 
1922-1942, 97-98 
1941-1942, 99-100, 197, 198 
State, 1941-1942, 99-100, 180-182, 197 
Architect, consultant, 180, 182 
Art, white high schools 
Enrollment, 44, 52, 216-221 
Teachers of, 57 
Assessable basis, 130-131 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 193 
Average daily, 192 
Effect of war on, 161 
Index of elementary, 16 

Officers, 144, 155-162, 200 • 

Percent of, 14-17, 194 

Summer school pupils, 89, 139 

Teachers at summer school, 70 
Audiometer tests, 34 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per white pupil for, 106, 108 



A — (Continued) 

Auxiliary agencies (Cont.) 
Expenditures for 

Colored, 208, 209 

Total by purpose, 202 

White elementary, 204 

White high, 205 
Percent of current expense budget, 101-102 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 53 
Belonging, average number, 191 

Each high school, 210-215 

Per teacher, 71, 72-75 

Proportion in high school, 13 
Birth rates, 12 

Board of Education, State, 2, 180, 182 
Bonds for schools, 125 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per white pupil 

Elementary, 106 

High, 108 
Expenditures 

All schools, 201 

Colored, 208-209 

White elementary, 204 

White high, 206 
Percent of current expense budget, 101-102 
State aid for, 1941-1942, 197 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

By age, 30-31 

By grade, 18 

Total, 184-185 
Graduates 

Elementary school, 21, 22-23 

High school, 36-37, 38-43 
Non-promotions 

Elementary, 21, 24-29 

First grade, 27 

High school subjects, white pupils, 
Each subject, 56-57 
One or more subjects, 54-55 
Budget(s) 

Local, county and Baltimore City 
1922-1942, 97-98 

1941- 1942, 99-100 

1942- 1943, 128-129 

State public school, 180-182 

State teachers colleges, 180-181 
Buildings, grounds and equipment 

Cost, (see capital outlay) 

Number of, 183 

Plans in defense areas, 146 

Value of school, per pupil, 126-127 
Buses and tires, 147 
By-laws re certification, 144-146 



222 



Index 



223 



C 

Capital outlay, school 

By year, 1922-1942, 97 

By sites, buildings, equipment, 203 

By types of schools, 124 

Colored, 208-209 

White elementary, 106, 204 

White high, 108, 205 
Census and attendance fund, 180, 197 
Certificates held by county teachers, 58-61 

Changes in standards for, 143-146 
Classes 

Evening school, 89-91, 94, 117 
Size of, 71-76, 87-88 
Special for handicapped, 34-35 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 89 
Clerks, county high schools, 58 
Clinics, 156, 160-161, 177, 178 
Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1941 entering, 41-43 
of 1942 entering teachers colleges, 38-40, 
210-215 

State teachers, 164-171, 180, 181, 210-215 
Training teachers appointed in Maryland 

counties, 1941-1942, 67, 165 
White high school graduates of 1941 entering 
Maryland, 42 
Commercial subjects, white high schools 
Enrollment 

Each high school, 216-221 
Total and by county, 44, 51 
Failures and withdrawals, 56 
Schools having, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 
Conference programs of 

Attendance Officers, 155-162 
High school principals, 152, 154-155 
Superintendents, 134-147 
Supervisors 
Colored, 154 

White elementary, 148-150 
White high, 150-152 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 84 
Schools closed by, 183 
Transportation of pupils, 119-123 
Cook, Albert S., retirement of, 140-142 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for white elementary and high 

school pupils, 106, 108 
By types of schools, 104 

Colored elementary and high schools, 111-112 
General control, 103, 104 
Individual high schools, 210-215 
One-teacher schools, white, 104, 107 
Transported, 121 

White elementary and high schools, 103-109 
State teachers colleges, 169, 171 



C — (Continued) 

Costs (see expenditures) 
Council of social agencies, 157, 159 
Courses in individual high schools, 210-215 
Crippled children, services for, 34, 35, 177 
Current expenses 
Cost per pupil 
Colored, 111-112 

Individual high schools, 210-215 
White elementary and high schools, 103-109 
Expenditures 
Colored, 208-209 
Total, 199 
White, 204-207 
Curriculum construction, 134-135, 149, 151 

D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, days 

in session, 8, 194 
Debt service 

1941- 1942, 125-126 

1942- 1943, 128-129 
Tax rate for, 132 

Defense training program, 93-96 
Dental clinics, 178 
Disbursements (see expenditures) 
Distributive education, 51, 90, 91 

E 

Employment of high school graduates, 38-43 
English, high school 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 

White, 44, 46 
Failures and withdrawals, white, 56 
Schools offering, 44, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 
Enrollment 

Adult, 89-91, 94 

Elementary, 9-10, 18-20, 184-185 
Grade or year, 18-20 
High school 

Course, each school, 210-215 
Growth in, 9, 11, 110, 113 
Subjects 
Colored, 45 
Each school, 216-221 
White, 44, 46-53 
Year, 18-20 

Each school, 210-215 
White, 46 

Non-public, private and parochial schools, 

9, 186-190 
Public schools, 10-11, 18-20, 184-185 
State teachers colleges, 166-167 



224 



Index 



E— (Continued) 

Enrollment (Continued) 
Subject 

Colored high, 45 
Each high school, 216-221 
White high, 44, 46-53 
Summary, elementary and secondary, public 

and non-public, city and county, 7 
Summer schools, pupils, 89 
Total public schools, 184-185 
Equalization fund, 99, 100, 197 
Equivalence examinations, 153 
Evaluative Criteria of Cooperative Study of 

Secondary School Standards, 155 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 89-91 
Expenditures, 117, 118, 202 
Expenditures, 199-209 

(See also general control, instruction, opera- 
tion, maintenance, auxiliary agencies, 
fixed charges, tuition to adjoining coun- 
ties, current expenses, debt service, 
capital outlay) 
Colored schools, 208-209 
Elementary schools, 204, 208 
Evening schools, 117, 202 
Health, 176, 202 
High schools, 205, 209 

Junior and junior-senior high schools, 206-207 

Libraries, 202 

Salaries 

All schools, 201 

Colored high, 113, 209 

Elementary, 204, 208 

Vocational teachers, 114-118 

White high, 110, 205 
State teachers colleges, 169, 170, 180, 181 
Summer schools, 202 
Total, by major classifications, 199 
Transportation, 119, 120, 202 
Vocational work, Federal, 94, 114-118, 180, 
182 

F 

Failures (see non-promotions) 

Farm machinery, repair of, 96, 135, 137 

Federal aid 

Federal Works Agency, 124, 197 

N. Y. A., 170 

Vocational education, 180, 182 

Administration and supervision, 118 
Defense training, 94 
Salaries of teachers 

Baltimore City, 118 

County day, 114, 115-116 

County evening, 117 



F— (Continued) 

Financial statements 

County schools, 197-203, 204-209 

State public schools, 180, 181, 182 

State teachers colleges, 180, 181 
Finney, Dr. J. M. T., death of, 163 
First grade 

Age for entrance to, 159 
■ Non -promotions, 26, 27 
Fixed charges, 202 
French 

Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 

White, 46, 50 
Failures and withdrawals, white, 56 
Schools offering, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 

G 

General control 

Cost per pupil, 103, 104 
Expenditures, 200 
Percent for, 101-102 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 53 
Graduates 

Elementary school, 21-23, 36-38 
High school 

Entering teachers colleges, 38-40 
From each school, 210-215 
Occupations of, 38-43 
Teachers colleges, 164-165 
Growth in high school enrollment, teachers, 

and salaries, 110, 113 
Guidance, 57, 118, 150, 155-156, 157 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 34, 180, 182 

Home instruction, 34, 35, 151 

Hospital schools, 34 

Opportunities for education of, 34-35 

Receipts from State, 34, 197 

Transportation, 34 
Hard-of-hearing children, 34, 35 
Health 

Activities of State Department of, 176-178 
Cost per pupil, 105, 106, 108, 111 
Expenditures 
All schools, 202 
By county health offices, 176 
High school equivalence examinations, 153 
High schools 

Disbursements, 205, 206-207, 209 
Individual, 210-221 



Index 



225 



H— (Continued) 

Home economics 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 

White, 44, 50 
Evening schools, 89, 90-91 
Federal aid, 114-118 

Recommendations for cooperation in war 

effort, 135, 137 
Schools having, 44, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 
Home instruction of pupils, 34, 35 

I 

Immunizations, 177 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 129 
Index of school attendance, 16 
Industrial arts (see also trades and industries) 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 

White, 44, 50 
Schools having, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 
Instruction 

Cost per white pupil, 106, 108 
Expenditures 

Colored, 208-209 

Junior and junior-senior high, 206-207 
Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 201 
State teachers colleges, 170-171 
White elementary and high, 204-205 
Percent of current expense budget, 101-102 

J 

Junior and junior-senior high schools, 206-207 

K 

Kindergartens, enrollment, 18, 19, 20 

L 

Languages (see English, French, Latin) 

Late entrants, 16 

Latin, (see French) 

Legislative council report, 147 

Length of session, 8, 139, 194 

Levies, county, 128, 129 

Libraries 

Colored schools, 175 

Expenditures all schools. 202 

Service from Library Advisory Commission, 
173-175 

Library Advisory Commission, service from, 

173-175 
Lip reading classes, 35 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per white pupil for, 106, 110 
Expenditures 

By type of repair, 202 

Colored, 208-209 

White elementary, 204 

White high, 205 
Percent of current expense budget, 101-102 
Materials of instruction and books 
Cost per white pupil for, 106, 110 
Expenditures 

Colored, 208-209 

Total, 201 

White elementary, 204 

White high, 205 
Percent of current expense budget, 101-102 
State aid for, 197 
Mathematics, high school 
Enrollment 

Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 
White, 44, 47 
Failures and withdrawals, white, 56 
Schools having, 44, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 
Medical examinations 
Pupils, 177 
Teachers, 180 
Men teachers, 195, 196 
Mental hygiene, 157, 160 
Mentally handicapped children, 34, 35 
Music, high school 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 

White, 44, 52, 53 
Orchestras, bands, etc., 53 
Schools having, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 

N 

National Youth Administration, aid to 

State teachers college students, 170 
Night schools (see evening schools) 
Non-promotions, 21 

Colored elementary schools, 21, 25, 26, 27, 29 
First grade, 27 
Subject, white high schools 
Each subject, 56 
One or more subjects, 54-55 
White elementary schools, 21, 24, 26, 27 
Number belonging, 191 
Each high school, 210-215 
Per teacher, 71 
Colored, 74-75 
White elementary, 72, 144 
White high, 73 
Proportion in high school, 13 



226 



Index 



N — (Continued) 

Number of schools 

Having one teacher, 83, 84 
Non-public, 186-190 
Public, 183 

Elementary, 83 

High, 86-88 

o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 38-43 
One-teacher schools 
Decrease in, 84 
Number of, 83, 183 
White 

Capital outlay for, 124 
Cost per pupil, 104, 107 
Decrease in, 84 
Number belonging in, 84 

Per teacher, 71 
Percent of attendance, 15 
Salary per teacher in, 82 
Operation 

Cost per white pupil, 106, 108 
Expenditures 

By fuel, janitors' wages, supplies, 201 
Colored, 208-209 
White elementary, 204 
White high, 205 
Percent of current expense budget, 101-102 
Orchestras, bands, etc., 53 
Outside agencies, relation of schools to, 136 
Overage pupils, 32-33 

P 

Parent-teacher associations, 133, 152 
Parochial and private schools, 9, 186-190 
Part-payment of salaries, 180, 197 
Persistence to high school graduation, 36-38 
Physical education and recreation 

Appropriation for, 180, 182 

High school enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 
White, 44, 52 
Program, 138 

Schools offering, 57, 216-221 
Teachers, 57 
Physical examinations (see medical examina- 
tions) 

Physically handicapped children, 34, 35 

Services for crippled children, 177 
P re-kindergarten classes, 13 
Presidents of teachers colleges, 2, 168 
Private and parochial schools (see parochial 

and private schools) 
Programs of conferences (see conferences) 
Property, valuation of 
County and City, 130-131 
School, 126-127 



P— (Continued) 

Protection of life and property, 135, 136 
Public welfare agencies, relations with, 155, 
158 

Pullen, Thomas G., Jr., elected State Superin- 
tendent, 143 

Pupils 

Non-public schools, 9, 186-190 
One-teacher schools, 83, 84 
Per teacher, 71, 72-76 
Public school 

Enrollment, 7, 184-185 

Number attending, 192 

Number belonging, 191 

Percent of attendance, 194 
Transported, 119, 120 

R 

Ration books distributed by teachers, 146 
Ratio of high school to total attending and 

belonging, 13 
Receipts from 
All sources, 198 
Federal Government, 197 

Evening schools, counties, 117 
Federal Works Agency, 124, 197 
N. Y. A., 170 

Teachers' salaries, counties, 114-118 
Vocational education, 114-118 
Baltimore City, 118 
Defense training, 94 
Rosenwald fund, 175, 182 
State 

Distributed by type of fund, 1941-1942, 

180, 197 
1922-1942, 97, 98 

Teachers colleges, 169-170, 180-181 
Total and percent, 99, 100 
Record card for elementary pupils, 148 
Registration of men for draft, 146 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 92, 180, 182 
Repair of farm machinery, 135, 136 
Reports from attendance workers, 161 
Resignations of teachers, 62-63 
Retirement System, Teachers, 

Financial statement, 180 

Members, 172 
Rosenwald fund, 175, 180, 182 

S 

Salaries 

Adjustment of, because of abnormal loss 

of teachers, 143 
Attendance officers, 200 
Growth in high school, 110, 113 
Percent of school budget, 101-102 
Superintendents, 134, 200 
Supervisors, 201 



Index 



227 



S— (Continued) 

Salaries (Cont.) 
Teachers 

Average per teacher, 76-82 
Cost per white pupil, 106, 108 
Total 

Colored elementary, 208 

Colored high, 113, 209 

White elementary, 204 

White high, 110, 205 

Vocational, 115-118 
Schools, number of, 7, 183 
Science, high school 
Enrollment 

Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 
White, 44, 49 
Failures and withdrawals, white high schools, 
56 

Schools offering, 57, 216-221 

Teachers, 57 
Session, length of, 8, 139, 194 
Sex of teachers, 195-196 

Simpson, I. Jewell, retirement of, 149-150 
Size of classes, 71-76, 144 
Size of school (s) 

Each high, 210-215 

Elementary, 83 

High, 86-88 
Social studies 

Curriculum revision, elementary schools, 148- 
149 

Enrollment in high school 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 
White, 44, 49 
Failures and withdrawals, white high schools, 
56 

High schools offering, 57, 216-221 

Teachers, 57 
Special classes for handicapped, 34, 35, 156 
Special high school teachers, 57, 210-215 
State 

Aid to health, 176, 197 
Aid to schools 

Showing various school funds, ISO, 197 
1922-1942, 97, 98 
Board of Education, 2, 180, 182 
Department of Education, 2, 180, 1S2 
Department of Health 
Expenditures, 176 
School activities, 177-178 
Public school budget, 180 
Teachers colleges, 2, 140, 155, 164-171 
Teachers Retirement System, 2, 172, 180 
Statistical tables, 183-227 
Stenography, typewriting, bookkeeping, 51 



S— (Continued) 

Subjects studied in high school 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 216-221 
White, 44, 46-53 
Summer school attendance 
Pupils, 89, 139 
County teachers, 70 
Superintendents, 2, 134-147, 200 
Supervision, Supervisors 
Activities 

Colored, 154-155 

White elementary. 148-150 

White high, 150-152 
Cost per white elementary pupil for, 106 
Cost, salaries, and expenses 

All schools, 201 

Colored elementary, 208 

White elementary, 204 

White high, 205 
Curriculum revision, 134-135, 149, 151 
Names of, white, 3 
Number of, 148, 150, 154, 196 
Percent of current expense budget, 101-102 
Survey, 147 

T 

Tall, Lida Lee. death of, 162-163 
Taxable basis, 130, 131 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 101-102 
Tax rates, county, 132 
Teacher! s) 

Academic, high school. 57, 210-215 
Certification of. 58-61 
Colleges, 2. 38-40. 140, 164-171 
Number of, 195-196 

For each high school subject, 57 
In each high school, 210-215 
In schools of each type 

Colored, 7, 83, 84, 88, 208-209 
Non-public schools, 7, 186-190 
Public schools, 7, 195-196 
White elementary, 7, 83, 84, 204 
White high, 7, 57, 86. 205 
White junior and junior-senior high, 206- 
207 

Total non-public and public school, 7 

Total public school, 195-196 
Pupils per, 71-76 
Resignations of, 62-63 
Salaries of, 76-82, 110, 113, 143-144 
Sex of, 195-196 

Special high school, 57, 210-215 
Summer school attendance of, 70 
Turnover of, 64-66, 68-69, 143 



228 



Index 



T— (Continued) 

Teachers' Retirement System 
Financial statement, 180 
Staff, 2 

Teachers' contributions to, 172 
Trades and industry, courses in 

Defense training, 93-96 

Enrollment, day schools 
Colored, 45, 116, 118 
Each high school, 216-221 
White, 44, 115, 118 

Evening schools, 89, 90-91 

Federal aid, 114-118 

Schools having, 57, 216-221 
Training centers, teachers colleges, 168 
Transportation of pupils, 119-123 

Cost, total and per pupil, 119-121 

Percent of pupils transported, 122 

Problems due to war conditions, 147, 162 
Tuition charge, teachers colleges, 169, 170, 171 
Turnover in teaching staff, 64-66, 6S-69, 143 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 130-131 

School property, 126-127 
Vocational education 

Enrollment, day schools, 44, 45, 115, 116, 
216-221 

Defense training, 93-96 

Evening schools, 89, 90, 91, 117 

Federal aid, 114-118, 180, 182, 197 

State aid, 180, 182 
Vocational guidance, 57, 118, 150, 155-156, 157 
Vocational rehabilitation, 92, 180, 182 

w 

W ar effort, cooperation of schools with, 135-14'J 
Withdrawals of pupils 
Elementary, 16 

Teachers colleges, freshmen, 168 
Workshops. 152 

Y 

Year, length of school, 8, 194 



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